How to volunteer at a music festival – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 26 febrero 2014 11:56 am

How does it work?

There may be moments when you’re dancing – in the mud, to an obscure post-grunge rock band with a man who looks distinctly like the Labour politician Tom Watson – when you begin to believe that festivals come together by magic. But you’d be mistaken. In fact, the great summer parties are a feat of hard work and meticulous planning, with hundreds (sometimes thousands) of people coming together to set them up and ensure they run smoothly. However, turning a profit can be tough and many festivals – both arts and music – depend on volunteers to ensure they go ahead. As a result lots of organisers offer fans free tickets, benefits or discounts in exchange for helping out. It’s a great way to get into the often pricey events on the cheap and the perfect opportunity to plan out a summer of partying or travelling in both the UK and abroad.

Do I need experience?

In most cases no experience is necessary but training will sometimes be provided.

What will I do?

Most festivals get their volunteers to help out with tasks such as giving out wristbands, car parking, monitoring gates, litter picking or just keeping an eye on things. If you already have experience in things like first aid or stewarding you could end up taking on a role with more responsibility, such as managing a team of stewards. Depending on the role you take on you will be expected to work a series of shifts over the course of the festival. Oxfam, which manages the stewards for all of the UK’s biggest festivals, usually requires volunteers to do three eight-hour shifts and you receive a food token for each, as well as plenty of free tea and biscuits.

Will I miss my favourite band?

Well, you will almost certainly miss some of the fun, although you should be able to swap shifts with your fellow stewards if your hours end up clashing with your dream performer. If you agree to do early and late shifts – such as helping set up prior to the festival and/or helping with the clean-up operation afterwards – you could find yourself free to enjoy the entire festival without working. And many people find festival volunteering a fun experience in itself; you get to make new friends and help bleary-eyed ravers find their missing glowsticks.

How much does it cost?

It’s free. Though in most cases you will be expected to pay a deposit to make sure you turn up to your shifts rather than disappearing in a flurry of cocktails and fancy dress after five minutes. Of course, while you save money on the event itself (and many organisations offer volunteers food vouchers) you should still budget for your food and drink.

Where can I do it?

Lots of places! Countless music and arts festivals around the world rely on volunteers so it’s worth checking websites or contacting organisers directly if there’s a particular festival you want to get involved with. See examples below.

Advice for a first-timer


Festival goers sharing a poncho in the rain during the second day of the Glastonbury Festival.
Glastonbury Festival … ‘I would do it with a friend as you can usually get paired up with them. And bring lots of snacks and a waterproof.’ Photograph: Anthony Devlin/PA

«I would do it with a friend as you can usually get paired up with them,» says Natalie Ward, who volunteered to steward at Glastonbury festival in 2009. «And bring lots of snacks and a waterproof as you may end up standing in the rain for hours. But it’s really fun; you get to meet lots of new people and you usually get to stay in your own campsite with showers and more space. And with tickets costing £180 now it’s great to have a free ticket; it takes a lot of the pressure off to have fun and you can just enjoy yourself.»

Where do I sign up?

Oxfam stewards
If you want to get yourself to any of the big-hitting British festivals (think Glastonbury, Bestival, Womad, Reading and Leeds), as well as a bunch of great smaller ones, such as Shambala and Boomtown, then you need to apply through Oxfam. The money Oxfam generates by running the service goes back into its charity work and it raises £1m each summer through festival work. Applications to steward open in spring but you should register your interest now in order to get a reminder. You will need to provide details of a referee and pay a deposit in order to apply. For 2013 the deposit was up to £205, depending on the festivals you chose, but you only need to pay one deposit even if you plan to volunteer at several festivals.
For information and to register your interest visit oxfam.org.uk/stewarding or contact the Oxfam festival team on 0300 200 1266 or email stewards@oxfam.org.uk

Work Exchange Team
In the States, the Work Exchange Team does a similar job to Oxfam, organising festival volunteering opportunities for music fans across a large number of American festivals, including the Californian music and arts festival Coachella and magical dance rave-up Electric Forest in Michigan. Again, you earn your ticket through shifts and the roles you take on will vary from festival to festival.
For more information and to sign up visit workexchangeteam.com

Festivals abroad


SXSW 2012 Music Festival Day 5
Mumford and Sons perform at the SXSW festival. The festival allows volunteers to earn wristbands giving access to various parts of the event. Photograph: Andy Sheppard/Redferns via Getty Images

SXSW festival
The week long «music, film and interactive» festival and conference in Austin, Texas, has become the darling of the hip, tech-savvy, entrepreneurial start-up world. It’s a huge event that runs each year thanks to 3,000 volunteers. The festival welcomes out-of-town volunteers, making it a great way for a newcomer to dive into one of America’s great modern cultural events. Out-of-town volunteers need to work a minimum of 30 hours throughout the festival as part of the conference crew or complete a minimum number of shifts with the production teams, with roles involving everything from technical support to registering visitors. Depending on the hours you work, you will earn wristbands giving you access to various parts of the festival. Limited hotel discounts are also available for volunteers.
For information and to register visit volunteer.sxsw.com

Outlook festival
If you want to combine amazing music with a beach holiday, electronic bass-fest Outlook – this year featuring Lauryn Hill and Busta Rhymes – is one of several in Croatia that takes volunteers. Roles include everything from box office to decor, and applications open in the spring.
Visit outlookfestival.com/get-involved or contact volunteers@outlookfestival.com for more details

Electric Picnic
A leftfield festival in Ireland, which combines top musical acts (last year the line up boasted Fatboy Slim and Björk) with art, performance and comedy. Volunteers need to pay a deposit equal to the value of a weekend ticket, shifts last six-to-eight hours and volunteers need to clock up 24 hours over the course of the festival. Registration for this year’s event is not open yet but visit electricpicnic.ie/volunteers12 for updates or contact volunteers@electricpicnic.ie

Sundance
It is one of the world’s most-respected independent film festivals and every year more than 1,800 volunteers help make it happen. Sundance, which takes place in Utah each January, requires volunteers to help run everything from shuttle stops to theatre entrances. Volunteers from around the world are welcome to apply and will get the chance to see world premieres of new indie flicks in return for their hard work, as well as getting food vouchers and a golden ticket to the staff and volunteer opening night party. Applications open in August.
For more information visit sundance.org/festival/volunteer or contact volunteers@sundance.org

Melt!
This rapidly expanding rock and electronic music festival in Germany relies on volunteers to help its 20,000-capacity event run smoothly. Volunteers must be able to speak German but the work providies an insight into the backstage workings of a large event and the organisers give out certificates for anyone using the experience as a step into the music industry.
For information visit meltfestival.de/en/meco/volunteers

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/feb/25/how-to-volunteer-music-film-arts-festival

Here Is a Map of Every State’s Favorite Band – TIME

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 26 febrero 2014 6:46 am

The Echo Nest provides a music intelligence platform to hugely popular services like Rdio, Spotify and MTV, so they have a ton of data on what people across America like to listen to. By digging into this well of information they were able to discern the favorite bands of each state and created a map that displays that data. For more info check out the blog of Paul Lamere, director of developer platform at The Echo Nest, who broke down the data further.

distinctive_artist_map1

Source Article from http://newsfeed.time.com/2014/02/25/here-is-a-map-of-every-states-favorite-band/

Angus & The Mearns – The Courier

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 26 febrero 2014 6:46 am

Montrose Music Festival has pulled off a major coup by landing three-chord rock legends Status Quo as its headline act.


The legendary UK rock band, who recently released their 100th single, will perform on Friday May 23 at Montrose East Links.

Quo frontman Francis Rossi said: “Playing live, outdoors is what we love to do. We’re really looking forward to being part of the Montrose Music Festival, which attracts bands from across the UK, and entertaining our Scottish fans. It’s set to be a special concert.”

The signing means a major step up in scale for the fetival.

An arena will be erected on the East Links to accommodate the thousands of Quo fans who are sure to flood into Angus for the show.

Montrose Music Festival, or MoFest as it has become known, has been running for seven years over which time it has attracted acts such as Toploader, Eddi Reader, Deacon Blue and The Proclaimers.

Festival chairman David Paton said: “The festival has grown year on year, since it was established in 2008, and 2014 is set to be bigger and better than ever before, as we welcome Status Quo to Montrose.

“Status Quo are legendary and always put on a great show and we’re delighted to confirm them as our headline act. It will certainly be a night to remember and tickets are expected to sell fast.”

Early Bird tickets, priced £37, will be available to buy at the Links Hotel in Montrose this Friday and Saturday from 10.30am–12.30pm, or online from 10am on Friday from www.ticketline.co.uk.

The rest of the weekend’s entertainment is free of charge with a range of bands, of all styles and genres, playing at a range of venues in the town.

Source Article from http://www.thecourier.co.uk/news/local/angus-the-mearns/status-quo-to-headline-montrose-music-festival-1.239546

Remote recording tech helps artists make sweet music – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 25 febrero 2014 3:33 pm







Alan Parsons in his studioAlan Parsons, who engineered Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon, thinks remote recording software is «the way of the future»

The latest digital audio recording technology has helped an unsigned London-based band hook up with one of the world’s most famous producers in California – even though they were 5,500 miles apart.



Technology of Business





And it is helping recording artists and session musicians around the world collaborate remotely, saving time and money.

Electric Litany weren’t expecting any response when they sent their first album to one of their musical heroes, Alan Parsons, the engineer behind some of the most celebrated albums of the 20th Century, including the Beatles’ Abbey Road and Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon.

But the musician who fronts the Alan Parsons Project Skyped them to say he liked their ethereal, melancholic sound and wanted to help them.

«I said to myself, they could be the next Radiohead,» he told the BBC.

«That was really fantastic,» says Richard Simic, the band’s drummer and co-founder. «The only problem was that Alan was in Santa Barbara and going over to his studio to record our second album would have cost us about $100,000 [£60,000]. That was money we just didn’t have.»


Electric Litany posed shotElectric Litany found Alan Parsons’ remote advice «invaluable»

They approached a few record labels for funding without success and even tried raising the money on crowdfunding site Kickstarter, but only secured pledges worth $15,000.


Start Quote

Remote recording has opened up a whole new world of cheaper collaboration that could not have existed before”


End Quote
Sam Inglis
Sound On Sound

Then technology came to the rescue.


‘Live feedback’

«Alan suggested we record the album in the UK and he would help us using some kind of real-time remote recording software,» says Simic.

While the band was setting up their equipment at Foel Studio in mid-Wales – a recording venue for bands as diverse as the Stranglers, Scritti Politti and Klaxons – Parsons was monitoring proceedings from Santa Barbara via tablet computer video link, advising on microphone positions, instrument choices and so on.

Using Source-Connect digital audio software, he was able to listen in to the band’s multichannel recording session in high fidelity and suggest how they could improve the sound and the arrangements for their newly-released album, Enduring Days You Will Overcome.

«It was like he was in the studio with us,» says Simic. «Getting live feedback was invaluable.»


The band in the studioSinger Alexandros Miaris shows Alan Parsons the drum set-up via webcam

Rebekah Wilson, 38, a composer and programming expert who founded Source Elements, the company behind the collaboration software, told the BBC: «What is unique about our software is that we restore and replace any missing digital packets of data automatically, so there is no disruption to the timeline. This gives the sense of near real-time, live recording.»

This week, Source Elements is rolling out a simple Chrome browser-based version of its software, enabling musicians and voice-over artists to record and share high-quality audio very simply. Monthly subscription costs will eventually be about $10, the company says.


Music in the clouds

Other remote recording providers are moving the whole process on to the cloud. For example, Ohm Studio stores your musical projects on its servers, allowing musicians from around the world to access the same project whenever they want and even simultaneously.


Ohm Studio software screengrabOhm Studio’s cloud-based software allows musicians to collaborate in real time

The system manages the workflow to prevent conflicts – one person trying to delete a track another person is still recording, for example – and changes are uploaded to the server and synchronised in real-time, so that each musician sees the latest version of the project.

The project originator can then outsource the final mix and production to an independent producer – all online, all remotely.


Start Quote

Far too much money is spent getting talent from one place to another”


End Quote
Alan Parsons
Music producer

Alternatives include Digital Musician, a social network that also offers an online sequencer and multi-track recorder production facility.


Creative collaboration

While the idea of remote recording has been around for decades, it was traditionally done over dedicated ISDN – Integrated Services Digital Network – lines, with tracks being recorded individually and built up layer by layer. This was expensive and therefore restricted to professional audio recording studios.

And for many years musicians emailed each other – sometimes very large – music files recorded using digital audio workstation (DAW) software, such as Apple’s Logic Pro, Steinberg’s Cubase, Cakewalk Sonar, or Image-Line FL Studio.

But faster broadband internet and mobile network speeds, plus improved audio compression codecs, have made online collaborations faster, easier and cheaper, and brought professional-quality remote recording facilities within reach of small businesses and «prosumers».


The Alan Parsons Project on stageThe Alan Parsons Project playing live – something software cannot yet replace

Sam Inglis, features editor for specialist audio recording magazine Sound On Sound, says: «In the 70s, people used to fly 24-track tapes across the Atlantic, which was pretty expensive. Remote recording has opened up a whole new world of cheaper collaboration that could not have existed before.»

Parsons, who acts as a brand ambassador for Source-Elements, agrees, saying: «I think this is the way of the future, especially as it can only get better. Far too much money is spent getting talent from one place to another.»


Light speed

But digital data cannot speed across the globe faster than the speed of light, so there will always be a slight delay, or latency, in the process, explains Wilson. This makes simultaneous recording of a transatlantic duet, say, still technically impossible.

«It takes about 100 milliseconds for internet data to get from the UK to New York and back. Once you add encoding and software latency, the round-trip time rises to 200 milliseconds on a good connection,» she says.

«That’s just way too high for musicians to be able to play in sync together remotely.»

So while technology is certainly removing distance as a barrier to creative collaboration «there’s still no substitute for playing together in the same room,» Inglis concludes.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-26256502

A cold night of amazing music at the 7107 International Music Festival – GMA News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | lunes 24 febrero 2014 7:23 pm

A cold night with the Red Hot Chili Peppers

The cold night did not bother the guests who spent their Sunday at the Logistics Park in Angeles City, Pampanga, to witness three big international musical acts as 7107 International Music Festival came to a close.

The festival was held in an enormous field. Upon entering, the guests were welcomed by local acts performing on the second stage, while nearby were food stalls where you could buy expensive beer (P80) and water (P100).

While there were clearly fewer people than the producers anticipated to fill the park’s hundred-plus hectares of land, the crowd that was there partied the night away in great festival fashion.

The majority of the attendees—both men and women—went for the safest formula: sleeveless tops and above-the-knee shorts. It was amusing to see men showing some skin at the event, despite the freezing weather. As for the ladies, bra tops and dangkal shorts were definitely 7107’s uniform look. Others even wore 7107 looks with aviators and round sunglasses at night.

Health and injuries

With an event as big as the 7107, injuries were inevitable. During Empire of the Sun’s set, a girl dressed in a white sleeveless top passed out. She later covered her face with her hair as security put her in a wheelchair and assisted her out.

According to a Medical City representative, sprain, fracture, and dehydration were the most frequently reported conditions at the event. Moreover, more of them occurred on the first day than on the second.

7017 and the pyrotechnics

The crowd seemed tired after Kendrick Lamar’s set, yet most of them were eager to see the spectacle of Empire of the Sun, while anxiously waiting for the festival’s pride and joy, the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Lamar’s one-hour set was cool—dressed in a black and white ensemble, the Grammy-nominated rapper performed his hit songs alongside his DJ on the stage. He also sent a message to the crowd, saying «I will be back» as the crowd went even wilder and shouted for more.

«Super solid! Hip-hop definitely has a place here in the country,» Iconn Cayabyab, a guest in the general admissions area, said to GMA News Online. «He played his famous songs from his Grammy-nominated album ‘good kid, m.A.A.d city’ and some from his old album, ‘Section 80’.»

«Everyone was pumped up when he played his famous songs. And when he challenged the crowd to shout out loud, everyone was game,» he added.

Empire of the Sun’s performance was a different ball game. The Australian duo showed the crowd what it felt like to watch a concert in full theatrics, with four backup dancers all dressed in white spacesuits.

The band also rocked the stage in their over-the-top costumes. Luke Steele went with his signature headdress that looked like the rays of the sun, while Nick Littlemore kept thanking Manila (even though the festival was set in Pampanga) for the warm welcome.

Their finale song was a smash. Performing their hit song and party-anthem «Alive,» the crowd were on their feet and singing along.

«Theyre the only artist who had stage props and effects! No dead moment kasi all their songs are upbeat,» concert-goer Nikki Santos said. «Even if people don’t know the lyrics, they’re still dancing!»

During the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ set, the main stage area was filled by a much larger crowd, with the VIP guests waving LED lights in the air and the rest singing to the band’s opening number.

The crowd went wild when the band performed «Dani California,» «Under The Bridge,» and «Californication.» Almost everyone was on their feet singing their lungs out, while some lay down on the grass, unmindful of the empty beer cans, used tissues, and water bottles and just looking up at the stars while enjoying the awesome music.

7107 concluded with beautiful fireworks the same time the RHCP closed their show with «Give It Away.» Upon exiting the field, the attendees seemed happy about the line-up of performers who gave their best at the controversial, but still somewhat successful, 7107 International Music Festival. It was surprisingly a night to remember. — BM, GMA News

Source Article from http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/349925/lifestyle/peopleandevents/a-cold-night-of-amazing-music-at-the-7107-international-music-festival

Bristol New Music Festival, review – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | lunes 24 febrero 2014 7:23 pm

Other things were thought-provoking as well as amusing, like the old footage
of Marcel Duchamp explaining one of his works, while the pianist imitated
the rise and fall of his voice.

Slightly more conventional was the concert from the Bristol Ensemble, a
locally-based chamber orchestra. It included Matthew Shlomowitz’s Avant
Muzak, an entertainingly po-faced deconstruction of muzak’s banalities,
mingled with odd scraps of sounds and speech gathered from the airwaves.
Alongside it were two pieces by Tansy Davies, one inspired by visions of sea
and seafaring, the other in her more familiar mode of high-energy,
dark-toned urban edginess.

The performances of these pieces were not quite fiercely focused enough to
make them really fly, while the gentler pieces – especially Michael
Ellison’s Turkish-flavoured Duo – fared better.

Good as these were, they were put in the shade by the spectacular and utterly
joyous Sunday-afternoon concert from Ensemble MusikFabrik. In the concert’s
second half they performed a clutch of pieces by Frank
Zappa
, in a way which reminded us that the gap between Zappa the
virtuoso guitarist and Zappa the “classical” composer was not so great.
Frank Wingold’s wailing guitar solo in RDNZL would have won Zappa’s
approval, and the crazy high jinks of Don’t You Ever Wash That Thing?, with
its mishmash of wild keyboard solos, kazoos, lachrymose sliding strings and
clashing giant cymbals, was a riot.

But Zappa is familiar, whereas the piece that filled the concert’s first half
was a mystery to most of us. This was the UK premiere of And On the Seventh
Day Petals Fell in Petaluma, by that strange American visionary Harry
Partch. Arrayed in front of us, across the entire width and depth of Colston
Hall, were gleaming replicas of the various instruments Harry Partch
invented.

He created them to bring back into music
the pure musical intervals which Western music has lost. They had wonderful
names, such as Spoils of War, Castor and Pollux, Diamond Marimba, Surrogate
Kithara, and they looked odd and familiar at once. There were giant zithers,
clusters of transparent globular drums, huge transparent bowls hung in rows,
harmoniums, outsize harps.

The devotion these players have shown in bringing Partch’s curious vision to
life is really beyond praise. They’ve each had to discover the playing
technique for several instruments, and then master a score that involves a
constantly changing pattern of duets, trios, quartets and (at the end) a
climactic number for all seven players.

They performed the piece with relaxed grace, as if to the manner born,
relishing the music’s extraordinary mixture of sounds and moods. Hints of
familiar things like Hawaiian guitar, church organs, and Balinese gamelan
were mingled with the strains of something thrillingly strange and
otherworldly.

Hear Ensemble MusikFabrik’s concert on Hear & Now on BBC Radio 3
on March 22

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/classicalconcertreviews/10657878/Bristol-New-Music-Festival-review.html

Maria Von Trapp, Last Of The Sound of Music Siblings, Dead at 99 – TIME

Posted by Google News | Industry News | lunes 24 febrero 2014 7:23 pm
Agathe von Trapp (center left) is joined by her sister Maria

New York Daily News Archive / NY Daily News via Getty Images

Maria von Trapp (center right) with her sister Agathe in 1998.

Maria von Trapp, the last surviving member of the Trapp Family Singers, the itinerant singing group whose escape from Nazi-occupied Austria inspired the The Sound of Music, died at the age of 99 in her Vermont home last Tuesday.

Von Trapp was the last surviving member of the seven Trapp Family Singers, made famous in The Sound of Music, the Associated Press reports. The musical children were born to Austrian Naval Capt. Georg von Trapp and his first wife, Agathe Whitehead von Trapp, in the Austrian Alps after the family fled fighting from World War I. The Von Trapps left Nazi-occupied Austria in 1938 and performed concert tours throughout Europe. They eventually settled in the United States in 1940.

She was famously portrayed as Louisa in the 1959 Broadway musical and 1965 film The Sound of Music, which won the Oscar for best picture.

“She was a lovely woman who was one of the few truly good people,” her brother Johannes von Trapp said. “There wasn’t a mean or miserable bone in her body. I think everyone who knew her would agree with that.”

Source Article from http://entertainment.time.com/2014/02/23/maria-von-trapp-last-member-of-sound-of-music-family-dies/

Classical music at the Sochi 2014 Closing Ceremony – Classic FM

Posted by Google News | Industry News | lunes 24 febrero 2014 2:20 pm

Opening to a soundtrack of Mussorgsky‘s Pictures at an Exhibition, as a young girl named Lubov (translated as ‘Love’) recapped some of the most exciting moments of the games. As three children, Lubov, Valentina and Yuri flew over a sea of hundreds of children dressed as waves, music from It’s a Wonderful Life filled the stadium, composed by Dimitri Tiomkin. His theme from Giant was also included later in the ceremony.

The National Anthem of the Russian Federation was performed by 1,000 children from the Children’s choir of Russia, conducted by Valery Gergiev, accompanied by the Panrussian Orchestra, conducted by Yuri Bashmet. Bashmet returned to the stage just minutes later to perform a viola solo in a polka by Schnittke. Singer Hibla Gerzmava who performed on a gondola suspended from the ceiling.

Rachmaninov also made an appearance, thanks to pianist Denis Matsuev who performed his Piano Concerto No. 2 as flames lit up the stadium. A further 60 pianos arrived on stage, played by men in white ‘composer’ wigs and tails.

Russia’s incredible ballet talents were put to good use with two stages representing the national theatres, the Bolshoi and the Mariinsky, with dancers performing to music from Scheherazade by Rimsky Korsakov. Khachaturian‘s Waltz played as the stadium was filled by key figures in Russian literature, including Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky and Chekov.

Other non-musical highlights included an amusing throwback to the Opening Ceremony, where only four of the five Olympic rings displayed correctly; this moment was recreated by hundreds of dancers on the floor of the stadium.

Source Article from http://www.classicfm.com/music-news/latest-news/classical-music-sochi-2014-closing-ceremony/

Maria von Trapp, last member of Sound of Music family, dies – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | domingo 23 febrero 2014 8:04 am







Maria von TrappMaria von Trapp was the second oldest daughter of Capt von Trapp


The last surviving member of the Trapp Family Singers, the group whose story inspired The Sound of Music, has died at the age of 99, her family say.

Maria von Trapp died at her home in Vermont on Tuesday, her brother, Johannes von Trapp, told the Associated Press.

He said she was a «lovely woman who was one of the few truly good people».

Von Trapp and her family fled Nazi-occupied Austria in 1938 and ended up performing around the US.

Their story eventually inspired the 1959 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, The Sound of Music, and subsequent 1965 hit film.

It tells the tale of a young woman who leaves an Austrian convent to become a governess to the seven children of a naval officer widower, Georg von Trapp.


‘Remarkable’

Maria von Trapp was the second-oldest daughter of Capt von Trapp – with his first wife – and was portrayed as Louisa in the musical.

Her family moved to the US state of Vermont in 1942 after visiting during a singing tour, and later opened a lodge in the town of Stowe, which they still operate.


A 1966 file photo shows members of the Trapp family as they gave a public concert at the family lodge in Stowe, Vermont.Maria von Trapp, third from left, performed with her family around the US

Writing in a blog post on the lodge’s website, von Trapp described how it was her ill health as a child that led her father to employ a governess to teach her and her siblings.

«She came to us as my teacher and after three years became our second mother,» she said.

Marianne Dorfer, a family friend who runs the von Trapp Villa Hotel in Salzburg told the Austrian Times that von Trapp had suffered from a weak heart since childhood.

Ms Dorfer said it was because of Maria’s ill heath that her father decided to hire a governess. «That of course then led to one of the most remarkable musical partnerships of the last century,» she added

The Sound of Music was based loosely on a 1949 book by the governess, who became Capt von Trapp’s second wife and died in 1987.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-26311694

American Idol Stars Sue Sony Music for $10m – Sky News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | sábado 22 febrero 2014 11:47 am

American Idol contestants including Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood are suing record label Sony Music Entertainment for $10m (£6m) in royalties.

The lawsuit has been filed by 19 Recordings, the music company founded by British entrepreneur and creator of the Idol franchise Simon Fuller.

Carrie Underwood
Carrie Underwood

It claims that Sony cheated the recording artists, which also include Clay Aiken, Chris Daughtry and Jordin Sparks, out of the royalties.

In the lawsuit, which was filed on Thursday, it says that 19 Recordings discovered the issue from two separate audits of Sony’s records.

Attorney Richard Busch, of the Nashville law firm King & Ballow, said the legal action was necessary to protect the rights of 19’s artists.

Fuller created Pop Idol in Britain in 2001, but sold it to the Fox network where it has become the most popular television show on US network television.

He is manager for some of the world’s biggest stars, including the Beckhams, and is reportedly worth £375m.

A Sony spokeswoman said she had no comment on the lawsuit.

:: Watch Sky News live on television, on Sky channel 501, Virgin Media channel 602, Freeview channel 82 and Freesat channel 202.

Source Article from http://news.sky.com/story/1215613/american-idol-stars-sue-sony-music-for-10m

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