Rihanna and Shakira’s new music video Can’t Remember To Forget You revealed – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Friday 31 January 2014 7:28 pm

By
Colette Fahy

03:50 GMT, 31 January 2014

|

18:49 GMT, 31 January 2014

They’re two of pop’s sexiest superstars so a Shakira/Rihanna collaboration was always going to be steamy.

The Barbadian beauty has joined the Colombian bombshell on her latest single Can’t Remember To Forget You and fans eagerly awaiting a saucy video were not disappointed. 

Featuring both stars in a series of skimpy outfits and later in a naked embrace, it’s sure to tot up huge numbers of views.

Scroll down for video…

Smouldering: Rihanna and Shakira ooze sex appeal in the new video for the latter's Can't Remember To Forget You

Smouldering: Rihanna and Shakira ooze sex appeal in the new video for the latter’s Can’t Remember To Forget You

Steamy: The duo get up close and personal in the new video, which features them both in a variety of sexy outfits

Steamy: The duo get up close and personal in the new video, which features them both in a variety of sexy outfits

Hold on tight: Rihanna enjoys a faux sapphic moment with Shakira

Hold on tight: Rihanna enjoys a faux sapphic moment with Shakira

The video opens with views of a tropical getaway before cutting to blonde Shakira, 36, on a bed in just a see-through white top.

With her hair in loose curls and wearing pink lipstick, she writhes around on the bed with her white underwear visible beneath her sweater.

It then cuts to her in a sexy black bathing suit, heels and chunky gold jewellery before we moved on to a pool where Shakira appears nearly naked.

Letting loose: Mother of one Shakira displays her bombshell side in her latest video

Letting loose: Mother of one Shakira displays her bombshell side in her latest video

Her next looks shows Shakira gyrating against a wall dressed in a risqué red Julien Macdonald dress, which is almost completely see-through.

And all this is before Rihanna even makes her first appearance.

The 25-year-old singer bursts onto the screens dressed in a black leotard covered in feathers.

What man? While the song is supposed to be about a man they both can't stay away from, there is no sign of him in the video

What man? While the song is supposed to be about a man they both can’t stay away from, there is no sign of him in the video

Bad girls: The duo lounge around smoking cigars in the sexy featurette

Bad girls: The duo lounge around smoking cigars in the sexy featurette

She turns to the camera to show off
her dark red lipstick and hair in loose curls around her face before it
cuts to the duo lying by a pool puffing on cigars.

As
the duo sing about their mutual addiction to a man who is no good for
them, they indulge in a dance off, with a wall separating them, showing
off their coordinating choreography which gets progressively
raunchier.  

Things heat up
as they return to the cabana by the pool and caress each other with
Rihanna placing her hand on Shakira’s pert posterior.

Raunchy: Rihanna and Shakira, dressed in similar black bathing suits, raunch up the video for Shakira's new single

Raunchy: Rihanna and Shakira, dressed in similar black bathing suits, raunch up the video for Shakira’s new single

Up close and personal: Rihanna and Shakira get up close and personal in the smouldering clip

Up close and personal: Rihanna and Shakira get up close and personal in the smouldering clip

It’s not all about hanging out with a scantily clad Rihanna though as Shakira shows off her musical prowess, playing guitar and then the drums while wearing just a bra and lace trousers.

Both women eventually ditch their clothes altogether to share a naked embrace, while another scene features Rihanna and Shakira standing close together with their arms entwined and the Diamonds star a breath away from kissing her companion’s cheek.

The Joseph Khan-directed video follows the single’s initial release earlier this month.

Having a laugh: It wasn't all sexy and smouldering as the women shared a laugh on set

Having a laugh: It wasn’t all sexy and smouldering as the women shared a laugh on set

Dance off: Rihanna and Shakira dance in unison on opposite sides of a wall in the video

Dance off: Rihanna and Shakira dance in unison on opposite sides of a wall in the video

Dance off: Rihanna and Shakira dance in unison on opposite sides of a wall in the video

Raunchy: Rihanna is known for her raunchy dance moves and doesn't disappoint in her collaboration with Shakira

Raunchy: Rihanna is known for her raunchy dance moves and doesn’t disappoint in her collaboration with Shakira

Release: The Joseph Khan-directed video follows the single's initial release earlier this month

Release: The Joseph Khan-directed video follows the single's initial release earlier this month

Release: The Joseph Khan-directed video follows the single’s initial release earlier this month

Shakira previously explained the
reasons for choosing Rihanna: ‘This song Can’t Remember To Forget You
combines both the reggae and the rock spirit. 

‘That’s why I thought that Rihanna was perfect and thought that she was the other half for this.’

Away
from the cameras, Shakira is a devoted mother to one-year-old son Milo
with her partner, 26-year-old Spanish soccer player Gerard Pique.

Back with a bang: Shakira has returned with a bang, with this single off her 10th album

Back with a bang: Shakira has returned with a bang, with this single off her 10th album

Getting attention: While the single is at 28 on the Billboard 100 chart, it sure to rocket after this video hits

Getting attention: While the single is at 28 on the Billboard 100 chart, it sure to rocket after this video hits

Cheeky: Shakira's pert derriere is put on show in the raunchy video, which was released on Vevo on Thursday

Cheeky: Shakira’s pert derriere is put on show in the raunchy video, which was released on Vevo on Thursday

‘When it comes to living, it’s all about the present,’ Shakira recently told People. ‘I’m finally able to really savor all of those little moments that, in the early days of my career, I was too busy thinking about the next thing to just stop, take it all in, and enjoy.’

Rihanna is said to be seeing her on-and-off again beau Drake despite him recently being linked to Zoe Kravitz.

The couple was spotted Sunday at the same Grammys after-party at the Greystone Mansion above LA’s Sunset Boulevard.  

Cheeky: Rihanna puts her derriere firmly on show as she writhes around in the video

Cheeky: Rihanna puts her derriere firmly on show as she writhes around in the video

  

Keep it simple in a black bandeau swimsuit

The long-awaited collaboration between two of pop music’s hottest babes – Rihanna and Shakira – has finally landed. But here are Femail Fashion Finder we’re not bothered about the music (well OK, we are a bit), but the clothes!

The artwork for the single doesn’t disappoint. Both girls look ultra glam with wavy side-swept hair and lashings of chunky gold jewellery.

She may not be on the beach, but Rihanna is in fact wearing a swimsuit by New York based designer Norma Kamali. Norma Kamali has been on the fashion scene since the 1960s, and designed the iconic red swimsuit which Farrah Fawcet wore in Charlie’s Angels.

Like the LBD (little black dress) a black bandeau swimsuit is a fashion classic, and every woman should have one in her wardrobe. For a show-stopping poolside look you can glam it up with chunky gold jewellery like Rihanna, or just wear it as is for a low-key day on the beach.

So what are you waiting for? You can get your hands on Rihanna’s exact Norma Kamali swimsuit by clicking the image on the right.

Alternatively shop the look for less in our gallery of black bandeau swimsuits – from ASOS’s super-sexy mesh insert offering to Resort’s bargain buy from Very.co.uk – in the gallery below.


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Revealing: Shakira's dress showed more than it covered but her modesty was saved by a nude bodysuit

Revealing: Shakira’s dress showed more than it covered but her modesty was saved by a nude bodysuit

Barely there! Shakira almost bared all in a plunging bodysuit with her hair covering her breasts

Barely there! Shakira almost bared all in a plunging bodysuit with her hair covering her breasts

Toned abs: Shakira showed off her toned abs as she writhed around in lace trousers and a bra

Toned abs: Shakira showed off her toned abs as she writhed around in lace trousers and a bra

Flawless: Shakira showed off her stunning figure as she lounged against a wall in the video

Flawless: Shakira showed off her stunning figure as she lounged against a wall in the video

The comments below have not been moderated.

XxM_MxX,

London, United Kingdom,

5 minutes ago

Hasn’t Shakira already done the holding on to a wall sticking your backside out whilst dancing provocatively in her video with Beyonce?? How original.

XxM_MxX,

London, United Kingdom,

7 minutes ago

Gotta laugh at how so many people go on about Shakira being so much classier than the likes of Rihanna, Beyonce, Gaga etc etc and now she does this LOL

Socrates,

London, United Kingdom,

26 minutes ago

I thought Shakira had more class than that

felixthecat,

Toad Hollow,

29 minutes ago

Rihanna should do something about her receding hairline.

Kitty Brads,

clacton on sea, United Kingdom,

32 minutes ago

shakira ur gawgus don’t let trash bring u down , stay natural and don’t go down that road

bearister,

oakland,

35 minutes ago

They should have brought Miley in too and then they could call the song “HO HO HO”

Lisa,

Aberdeen,

43 minutes ago

I hate this song!

Shazz T,

Seattle, United States,

51 minutes ago

Miley will be so jealous now.

CJ,

Shropshire, United Kingdom,

58 minutes ago

Both. At the same time. Thanks you, please.

Granny58,

PA, United States,

1 hour ago

Patsy Cline, Barbara Streisand, Linda Ronstadt – yes, all the greats writhe around with a G-string up their butts.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Who is this week’s top commenter?
Find out now

Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2549185/Rihanna-Shakiras-new-music-video-Cant-Remember-To-Forget-You-revealed.html

Midnight Memories has landed: One Direction unveil music video for brand new … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Friday 31 January 2014 7:28 pm

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By
Hanna Flint

16:47 GMT, 31 January 2014

|

18:34 GMT, 31 January 2014

All those late nights filming in London have paid off for One Direction fans, as the band has finally released its official music video for Midnight Memories.

The single is also the title of their third studio album, which was the biggest selling pop record of 2013.

Directioners will certainly find the video more than appealing, as the boys take the viewers with them on a night out.

Scroll down for video

They're back: One Direction release music video for new single Midnight Memories

They’re back: One Direction release music video for new single Midnight Memories

Midnight Memories sees the band at
their most exuberant and energetic. Co-written by Louis Tomlinson and
Liam Payne, the song reflects the band’s growing maturity.

In a series of colourful scenes, the band can be seen enjoying a house party and popping into a kebab shop, where they are joined by a host of fans.

They also enjoy a late-night ride on five red mobility scooters and dance with a group of elderly revellers.

Take away time: One Direction visit a kebab shop after a house party

Take away time: One Direction visit a kebab shop after a house party

Award-winning: It was announced by the boys' manager Simon Cowell that the lads were last year's biggest selling artist in the world

Award-winning: It was announced by the boys’ manager Simon Cowell that the lads were last year’s biggest selling artist in the world

Lads' night out: The boys tell the story of an evening on the tiles in the song

Lads’ night out: The boys tell the story of an evening on the tiles in the song

Back in an apron: The former baker, Harry, serves up some fast food

Back in an apron: The former baker, Harry, serves up some fast food

Keeping it real: One Direction hit the kebab shop in a behind-the-scenes still from their new Midnight Memories single

Keeping it real: One Direction hit the kebab shop in a behind-the-scenes still from their new Midnight Memories single

Feeling hungry? Liam Payne tucks into some pitta bread when in the restaurant

Feeling hungry? Liam Payne tucks into some pitta bread when in the restaurant

The
boys later climb aboard a police boat where they are seen sporting some
pretty nifty life-jackets before singing their hearts out while
harnessed on top of Tower Bridge.

The album Midnight Memories achieved the biggest pre-order in
iTunes history, and saw One Direction become the first band ever to have
their first three albums debut at No.1 in the US Billboard chart.

Meanwhile it went on to hit No.1 in a further 30 countries and became the best-selling album of 2013 in the UK, with the highest week one sales for three years.

Awkward: Louis sits next to a couple sharing a smooch

Awkward: Louis sits next to a couple sharing a smooch

Sure he's got more than few midnight memories... Harry gets a close up in the video

Sure he’s got more than few midnight memories… Harry gets a close up in the video

  

Stay versatile in a statement check shirt like Harry’s

It would seem that One Direction heartthrob Harry Styles has new favourite designer. After being spotted out and about in their iconic hooded duffel coat, he’s now sporting his signature plaid shirt from Saint Laurent’s AW13 collection again!

Here we see one of those rare timeless pieces that looks great, is super wearable and will last throughout the seasons; the classic checked shirt. Made famous in the nineties, this wardrobe staple has been worn by everyone from Kurt Kobain to Johnny Depp, so if you haven’t invested in one just yet, now is the time.

Ladies, if you’re stuck for a style for your very own boy band boyfriend, allow us to recommend a rugged flannel shirt. Guaranteed to become a staple piece, it will look and feel great. And gentlemen – you can’t deny he’s a dapper chap, so be hot on Harry’s heels and invest big in this trend.

Unsurprisingly, the Saint Laurent version is no longer available. So we’ve rounded up our favourite high street alternatives. Native Youth’s country plaid shirt (below) is spot on. Buy a few sizes up for an oversized off-duty look and team with classic black jeans and Chelsea boots if you’re keen to head in Harry’s direction.


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Simon Cowell said this week: ‘One Direction were the biggest selling
artists in 2013. I know how much they put into this record from start to
finish. Very proud.’

It’s a great accolade for the band, who shot to fame just four short years ago during the X Factor 2010.

The
band has been named the IFPI Global Recording Artists of 2013,
receiving the newly-created award honouring the most popular recording
artist across music downloads, streaming and physical format sales.

He's got the moves: Harry Styles shows off his dancing feet with an energetic leg kick

He’s got the moves: Harry Styles shows off his dancing feet with an energetic leg kick

Wheely good time: 1D get shown how to party by some of their more mature fans

Wheely good time: 1D get shown how to party by some of their more mature fans

Swoon-fest: Louis kisses the hand of one particularly older lady

Swoon-fest: Louis kisses the hand of one particularly older lady

The band are nominated for Best British Group and Best British Single at the 2014 Brit Awards.

2014 will see One Direction head off
on an incredible worldwide stadium tour, taking in the UK and Europe,
South America and the USA and Canada. 

On Monday, the boys Tweeted their fans to let them know about one of their tour dates.

They said: ‘You got it! 1D will be performing at London’s @wembleystadium on the 7th June! RT if you’ll be there! 1DHQ x’

Water performance: The band embark upon a police boat as their midnight jaunt continues

Water performance: The band embark upon a police boat as their midnight jaunt continues

Thumbs up: Niall Horan poses from a section of Tower Bridge to which he was harnessed

Thumbs up: Niall Horan poses from a section of Tower Bridge to which he was harnessed

Great view: The band jump on a police boat to take them down the Thames

[caption

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

zip123,

london,

1 hour ago

awful song and video

Blah Blah Blahh,

Sheffield,

1 hour ago

Loved the video it’s cheesy and fun

pwini,

Scotland, United Kingdom,

1 hour ago

LOVE IT!!!!!!!!!! Great song! No need for horrible comments about 1D on here :-)

ChrisBrown,

London, United Kingdom,

1 hour ago

Definitely the best band EVER!

Sophie C,

Lincoln,

2 hours ago

So nice to see a clean music video for once. Unlike Enrique’s recent one! Love these lads and so glad they’re still so humble and respectful despite their success.

Truth,

Glasgow, United Kingdom,

2 hours ago

Their appeal is more so to do with their good looks and personalities, rather than the music their songwriters wrote for them

roar456,

London, United Kingdom,

2 hours ago

I think they’re actually pretty cute

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Who is this week’s top commenter?
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Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2549625/Midnight-Memories-landed-One-Direction-unveil-music-video-brand-new-single.html

Pete Seeger: the road goes on for ever – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Thursday 30 January 2014 1:16 pm

You didn’t have to listen to Pete Seeger‘s music to feel his effect on the popular music of the last 70 years. It was his influence that set the moral compass of many great singers and songwriters, ensuring that even in the times when the music industry threatened to be washed away by the tide of its own most bloated, celebrity-worshipping, money-grubbing excess, the voice of a social conscience could still be heard.

Along with Woody Guthrie and Lead Belly, he brought the music of the dirt farms, the sweat shops and the lonesome highways into America’s – and later the world’s – living room. By refusing to allow traditional forms of musical expression to die, by “sowing the music of the people”, as he put it, he ensured its availability for infusion into later developments, serving to keep a sense of moral purpose alive even when that seemingly fragile element appeared to have been asphyxiated.

He was not a crusader on behalf of some academic notion of authenticity; he knew that music had to evolve, but he preferred it to retain a core of accessibility and potential relevance to a mass audience. Yet although his own style of performance – lively but dignified, informal but literal, paying no heed to the devices of showbiz stagecraft – may have been rendered obsolete by the discoveries of those who owed him a great deal, nevertheless everyone knew the lanky, unstylish figure and what he stood for, and that was more than enough.

When Bruce Springsteen and Ry Cooder released albums during the run-up to the 2012 US presidential election, using their songs to make strong and unequivocal statements on behalf of those weakened and dispossessed by the activities of the super-rich, they were following the example of Bob Dylan, whose early protest anthems, such as Blowin’ in the Wind and The Times They Are a Changin’, emerged from the scene that Seeger had done much to nurture.

The unknown Dylan had benefited from Seeger’s patronage, and all acknowledged his crucial role. When Springsteen recognised the need to drag himself out of a becalmed period at the start of the new millennium, it was to Seeger’s music that he turned for inspiration. The Seeger Sessions, with their joyful singalong versions of We Shall Overcome and Jacob’s Ladder, would be the catalyst for his artistic regeneration.

It was the perfect example of Seeger’s belief in the folk process, the invisible but enduring mechanism by which source material survives being handed on and transformed at the hands of successive eras. Speaking to Alec Wilkinson of the New Yorker, Springsteen remarked that Seeger “had a real sense of the musician as historical entity – of being a link in the thread of people who sing in others’ voices and carry the tradition forward … and a sense that songs were tools, and, without sounding too pretentious, righteous implements when connected to historical consciousness”.


Almanac Singers
The Almanac Singers in the early 1940, including Pete Seeger (middle) and Woody Gurthrie (first left). Photograph: Michael Ochs Archives

Where did the story begin? The day in 1936, perhaps, when the 17-year-old Seeger heard Bascom Lamar Lunsford, the “Minstrel of the Appalachians”, play the banjo at a festival of folk music in North Carolina and took up the instrument with such aptitude and devotion that his own subsequent book, How to Play the 5-String Banjo, became and remains a standard text for students of the instrument. The son of a composer-violinist mother and a father who was an eminent musicologist, Seeger embarked on a lifelong mission to demonstrate that seemingly archaic forms could be absorbed and recycled by younger performers. They might never have picked a boll of cotton or worked in a turpentine camp or come any closer to a southern prison farm than the dean’s office at an Ivy League college (Harvard, in his own case), yet they could achieve a degree of transformative empathy with those who had direct experience of such things.

Or maybe it was when, in 1940, he was introduced to Woody Guthrie by the great musicologist Alan Lomax, a friend of his father and for whom he was working as an assistant at the Library of Congress, putting his enthusiasm to good use by sorting through and untangling various forms of American vernacular music. Guthrie and Seeger would come to represent different poles of the same world: one a self-mythologising drifter with an outsider’s wild charisma, the other a steadfast, reassuring figure amid turbulent times.

A year later, Seeger joined the Almanac Singers, whose repertoire expressed their identification with the struggle of labour unions; within a further 12 months he had become a card-carrying member of the American Communist party. Soon he would be helping to found the People’s Songs organisation, with the aim of spreading the gospel of songs dealing with the lives of real people in the real America, the miners and mill workers and sharecroppers on southern plantations, a world away from the sophisticated classes celebrated in the songs of Broadway and Tin Pan Alley.

He accomplished that with the Weavers, the group he formed in 1950, and who would establish a template for the folk revival of that decade and its transmutation in the early 1960s. Despite maintaining the focus on songs of social relevance, they often wore formal dress in concert and their recordings were lavishly orchestrated by the Broadway arranger Gordon Jenkins. Their hits included Lead Belly’s Goodnight, Irene, the Israel folk song Tzena, Tzena Tzena and Kisses Sweeter Than Wine: hardly the anthems of a coming revolution, but in 1952, at the height of the anti-communist witch hunt, their known sympathies got them blacklisted by radio and TV stations and concert promoters. Seeger’s refusal to divulge his political beliefs in front of the House Un-American Activities committee that year exposed him to the kind of ordeal unimaginable to any popular singer today, its last echo probably coming in the vendetta waged against John Lennon, an opponent of the Vietnam war and other US-sponsored conflicts, by J Edgar Hoover’s FBI.


Pete Seeger at the House Un-American Activites committee
Pete Seeger at the House Un-American Activites committee in 1952. Photograph: Bettmann/Corbis

At a time when the word of the gathering folk revival was spread by magazines, Seeger wrote a column for the influential Sing Out! and co-founded Broadside, which published Dylan’s songs. With his own compositions, including If I Had a Hammer and Where Have All the Flowers Gone, he and his co-authors gave younger folkies – the Kingston Trio, Trini Lopez, Peter, Paul and Mary and their legions of imitators around the world, at first clean-cut but gradually more picturesquely dishevelled – the cornerstones of a basic repertoire, soon to be augmented by the Dylan songbook. An idea of his standing among his contemporaries at that time could be gauged from Johnny Cash’s words when introducing Dylan to the audience at the 1964 Newport Folk Festival: “We think he’s the best songwriter of the age since Pete Seeger.”

In the eyes of some members of later generations, Seeger assumed the role of a politely tolerated uncle who would seldom be asked about his heroic deeds in past wars. He can be seen in that role in Murray Lerner’s film of Dylan at Newport, an event which Seeger co-founded and on whose board he served. In 1963 Seeger is standing discreetly behind Dylan and alongside Joan Baez, the Freedom Singers and Peter, Paul and Mary during the festival’s finale, singing Blowin’ in the Wind. A year later he is sitting to one side of Dylan, listening intently and tapping his foot to Mr Tambourine Man, his thoughts only to be imagined as the singer’s new visions unfold – “Then take me disappearing through the smoke rings of my mind/ Down the foggy ruins of time” – with no reference to iron-ore miners or civil-rights marchers. In 1965, Seeger is not seen but we know he is behind the scenes, arguing with the sound crew as Dylan’s new electric band blasts out Maggie’s Farm and Like a Rolling Stone. In the first and most enduring version of the story, Seeger attempted to take a fire-axe to the electric cabling in order to cut the amplification. Thereby, the tale implies, he would restore the music to its prelapsarian state of acoustic purity.

As a foundation stone of that particular hall of the many-mansioned Dylan legend, the incident ranks second only to the enraged fan’s cry of “Judas!” at Manchester’s Free Trade Hall the following year. But Seeger’s own version, told in No Direction Home, Martin Scorsese’s Dylan documentary, was slightly different. “I was the MC that night,” he said. “He was singing Maggie’s Farm and you couldn’t understand a word because the microphone was distorting his voice. I ran to the mixing desk and said: ‘Fix the sound, it’s terrible!’ The guy said: ‘No, this is what the young people want.’ And I did say that if I had an axe I’d cut the cable. But I wanted to hear the words. I didn’t mind him going electric.”


Seeger at an Occupy Wall Street protest
Seeger, aged 92, marching with demonstrators in support of the Occupy Wall Street protests in New York in 2011. Photograph: John Minchillo/AP

Powerfully affected by the widespread publicity given to the incident, Seeger resigned from the festival board, retreated from music for a while and turned his attention to the environment. Once again he was setting a trend followed by younger performers, such as Jackson Browne, Graham Nash, Bonnie Raitt and their fellow members of Muse – Musicians United for Safe Energy – featured in the No Nukes concert at Madison Square Garden in 1979.

As Lauren Laverne, the BBC6 Music DJ, succinctly put it, it was Seeger’s destiny to be ”loved and hated by precisely the right people”. He was on the side of working people, refugees from fascist regimes, nuclear disarmament and the earth’s threatened natural resources, and against segregationists, Stalinists and the military-industrial complex. Nor, despite advancing age, did he cease from mental fight. He and Springsteen sang Guthrie’s This Land is Your Land together at Barack Obama’s inauguration in 2009, and four years later, aged 92, he recorded Dylan’s Forever Young with the Rivertown Choir, a group of deprived kids he had been mentoring for the previous five years. And when thousands of Norwegians gathered in Oslo in 2012 to mourn the victims of the mass murder on Utoya island, they sang My Rainbow Race which he had written in 1972, when his country was engaged in criminally murderous activity in south-east Asia: “Some want to take the easy way/ Poison, bombs – they think we need ‘em/ Don’t they know you can’t kill all the unbelievers/ There’s no short cut to freedom”.

Pete Seeger took the long road, a road that never ends, and which he lit so that others might find their own way along a righteous path.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jan/28/pete-seeger-road-goes-on-for-ever-folk-traditions

Lorde fed up with ‘lecherous gaze’ of music industry – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Thursday 30 January 2014 1:16 pm

Lorde, whose real name is Ella Yelich-O’Connor, shot to international
prominence last year with Royals, a song about feeling alienated from the
luxury lifestyle promoted by popular culture.

The artist, who hails from Auckland’s affluent North Shore, has been
front-page news in New Zealand this week after her eye-catching performance
at the Los Angeles awards show.

She said she was becoming used to being a public commodity, adding “the
fact that I’m getting used to it frightens me”.

“There is a difference between attn from fans, which I love, and the
constant, often lecherous gaze that I’m subjected to in this industry,”
she tweeted.

“I know that success comes with a price tag. it just sucks when you see
that in your tiny home country where you previously felt safe.”


Lorde – Royals on MUZU.TV.

Earlier, Lorde had praised her homeland’s public and media for their support
in a full-page advertisement in the New Zealand Herald.

“I just wanted to say thank you for the time you’ve given me these past
14 months, finding out about me online, or in between these pages, or in
your headphones,” she said.

GRAMMYS
2014 IN PICTURES

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/music-news/10603852/Lorde-fed-up-with-lecherous-gaze-of-music-industry.html

[Hands-On] Beats Music May Look Better Than Other Music Streaming Apps, But … – Android Police

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 29 January 2014 10:05 pm

Do we need another streaming music service? There’s Pandora for people who always want to listen to something new, Spotify for people who want access to a large number of music as soon as it comes out, and All Access for Android users who want to combine streaming new music with the albums they’ve already backed up to Google Music. Then there’s Rhapsody and Rdio for, I guess, the same people who like Spotify. Or is it Pandora users they’re going after?

With so many options, it’s easy to scoff at the thought of yet another contender throwing their hat in the ring. But Beats Music isn’t a surprise entry. If anything, it’s the successor to the MOG service that Beats acquired back in 2012, which is scheduled to shut its doors in just a matter of months. MOG started off as a music-centric social network, and elements of that have made it into Beats Music. You need a username to use the service, and you don’t just add songs from your favorite artists, you “follow” them.

But when it’s all said and done, Beats Music is another music streaming option in a sea of established brands. It definitely looks and feels different from those that have come before, but at the end of the day, it’s all about the music. And in that area, the service currently leaves a bit to be desired. Don’t be fooled by its pretty looks.


What Does Beats Music Get Right?

The Beats Music interface is spot on. Right from the beginning, it holds your hand through creating an account (though it did crash when I tried to sign-in using Twitter). After creating a username and selecting a photo, the app sprays you with bubbles filled with genres and artists, letting you enlarge the ones you like and pop the ones you don’t. If you get distracted in the process, swiping bubbles around longer than you need to, don’t worry, you’re in a safe place here. To be honest, I enjoyed this part of the app more than anything that followed.

Beats3 Beats4 Beats5

Overall, the interface is consistently solid. The home screen tries to nudge you towards new music, and the sidebar on the left lets you access your playlists and your saved library of albums. Finding music is easy, navigating artists doesn’t waste a bunch of screen real estate (unlike Google Music and its cards interface), and the app ultimately looks stylish in the process. Between discovering new music, building up a library, and downloading favorite albums for offline use, there’s plenty to do here (though there isn’t a widget, if you’re big on those).

Beats36 Beats22 Beats21

Beats16 Beats18 Beats19

Beats23 Beats24 Beats27

As for the social network stuff, it’s currently very limited. There’s a sidebar on the right side of the screen that requires you to follow a number of artists before it becomes useful for anything. It could be nice, but I forgot it was there more often than not.

There aren’t many settings to deal with, but Beats Music does provide a useful page that allows you to handle when the app should download music, what quality the tracks should be in, and how much space is being taken up. There’s even a big red button labeled “Delete All Stored Music” that, for a streaming app, is the equivalent of firing ze missiles.

Beats29 Beats30 Beats31


What Does It Get Wrong?

Beats1 Beats2

This.

One of Beats Music’s unique features is the ability to launch a streaming playlist by choosing preferences in “The Sentence.” The app lets you pick variables based on where you are, what you’re feeling, who you’re with, and what genre you’re interested in. The format is intuitive, and the options are hilarious. It’s just a shame that the end result isn’t exactly what we in the biz would call a hit. As someone who established a big preference for hip-hop and R&B during the setup process (not to mention popping pop), I wouldn’t think the app would ever think I’m in the mood for Avril Lavigne. There are plenty more artists from the 2000s that I could wake up at my computer with while surrounded by zombies, and for the record, none of the songs below exactly fit the bill.

Beats10 Beats11 Beats12

Before moving on, I really want to emphasize just how sad The Sentence made me. This part of Beats Music is innovative and attractive, but the end result was consistently disappointing. It’s as though the app is saying, “Oh, you want to listen to that? How cute. Here’s what I want to play.” I wouldn’t consider “Promiscuous” by Nelly Furtado and Timbaland something I ever want to listen to with family members (younger, older – it’s awkward either way), and the lyrics of “Deep Inside” by Mary J. Blige hardly gives me with the impression that I’m winning. Oh, the song also came out in 1999, but I’ll give that a pass. It only missed the 2000s by a couple of months.

Beats6 Beats7

The app was also consistently buggy, failing to refresh whenever I tried to change any of the variables in my original sentence. So, most unfortunately, discovering weird combinations was the most enjoyment I found in the entire feature.

Beats9 Beats13 Beats8

The Sentence isn’t the only way Beats Music goes about recommending music. There’s a “Just For You” tab that nudges you towards artists it thinks you would enjoy. There’s also a “Highlights” tab that points out music trends that Beats “experts” considers worth checking out. I didn’t find either page all that compelling. Both tended to highlight pop artists. You know, the ones I don’t need any help discovering.

Beats14 Beats15 Beats32

Beats33 Beats34

That really sums up much of the Beats Music experience. It’s great for pop, but even with access to over 20 million songs, it can be difficult to come across tracks that are decidedly less mainstream. I thought I was doing the app a favor by indicating a preference for Rap & Hip-Hop, as opposed to genres like Heavy Metal or Screamo, where even the major bands often evade the public radar. But the app only gave me very mainstream, very poppy music. I never felt that Google Music All Access did a particularly great job of knowing what I’m into, but it did a much better job than Beats Music. If I only wanted to listen to megahits, I’d turn on the radio.

I wish my complaints ended there, but no. At the end of the day, this app was a buggy hot mess. Opening the app without a data connection established consistently left me stranded in offline mode, with no way to disable it once online. No matter how often I tapped on the toggle that appeared in the sidebar, nothing happened, so I ultimately had to restart my device every time this happened (and sometimes even that didn’t work). Some other AP writers also suffered from serious battery drain issues, though, fortunately, I at least managed to avoid that buggy aspect.

Beats35 Beats28

These are still early days for the service, so while the instability is annoying, it’s likely to go away with time. Though, if I’m being frank, I can’t say the technical difficulties were all bad. At least they distracted me from the annoying songs the app insisted on pumping through my Bluetooth speakers.


Should You Use It?

There are a few reasons to consider using Beats Music over the competition, such as free streaming and family plans starting at just $14.99, that I couldn’t test out since I’m not an AT&T customer. If you are, then these may just be the most compelling reasons to give Beats Music a go. Otherwise, at $9.99 a month, don’t bother. It’s a looker, but you really shouldn’t make any commitments just yet. It has some issues it needs to work through first.

Source Article from http://www.androidpolice.com/2014/01/28/hands-on-beats-music-may-look-better-than-other-music-streaming-apps-but-like-your-friends-warned-its-just-too-shallow/

Prince drops copyright lawsuit against bloggers accused of sharing concert … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 29 January 2014 10:05 pm

By
Daily Mail Reporter

07:25 GMT, 29 January 2014

|

18:50 GMT, 29 January 2014

Prince has dropped the federal copyright infrignement lawsuit he filed less than two weeks ago seeking $22 million from 22 bloggers who allegedly posted his songs online illegally.

The 55-year-old music legend filed the lawsuit on January 16 in a US federal district court in San Francisco seeking $1 million from each blogger for allegedly distributing concert footage.

The alleged bootleggers had been accused in the lawsuit of using Facebook and Google’s Blooger to link to live concert recordings without permission from Prince.

Scroll down for video…

Lawsuit dropped: Prince, shown at the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles in 2013, has dropped his $22 million copyright infringement lawsuit against 22 bloggers

Lawsuit dropped: Prince, shown at the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles in 2013, has dropped his $22 million copyright infringement lawsuit against 22 bloggers

The lawsuit was first reported on Monday by TorrentFreak, a website that covers file sharing and copyright issues.

Prince’s lawyers filed documents in the federal court to dismiss the lawsuit, according to a report on Tuesday by TMZ.

The motion to dismiss the lawsuit was filed without prejudice, meaning the singer could refile the lawsuit if he wishes.

Concert footage: Prince, shown in May 2013 in Las Vegas, sued the bloggers for sharing concert footage

Concert footage: Prince, shown in May 2013 in Las Vegas, sued the bloggers for sharing concert footage

Only two of the 22 defendants were named in the lawsuit and the rest were referenced by their online handles such as PurpleHouse2, PurpleKissTwo and WorldOfBootleg.

The lawsuit alleged that bootleggers offered recordings of Prince performances, including concert footage from 1983 in Chicago, 2002 in Oakland, California and 2011 in North Carolina.

Prince performed in Connecticut in December with his all-female band 3rd Eye Girl.

Music legend: Prince, shown onstage at the Billboard Music Awards in 2013 in Las Vegas, will perform next month in London

Music legend: Prince, shown onstage at the Billboard Music Awards in 2013 in Las Vegas, will perform next month in London

The group on Tuesday released a 28-second teaser of their new song PRETZELBODYLOGIC from the upcoming album PLECTRUMELECTRUM.

Prince previously announced that he will return to London next month to play in ‘iconic venues’ throughout the capital city.

The singer’s first stop on the Hit And Run tour will be the living room of 24-year-old British singer/songwriter Lianne La Havas’ London flat.

The London tour will start on February 3 and will be his first live performance in the UK since his appearance at the Hop Farm Festival in Kent in 2011.

Long career: Prince in a scene from the 1984 movie Purple Rain

Long career: Prince in a scene from the 1984 movie Purple Rain

The comments below have not been moderated.

Imagine148,

NYC, United States Minor Outlying Islands,

1 hour ago

What? I guess he’s running out of money and wants to get money somehow now? Hmmm….

Sushi_me,

New York City, United States,

2 hours ago

PR stunt..

pinkytoots,

beverly hills, United States,

2 hours ago

seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeexxxxxxxxxxxxxyyyyyyyyyy ooh yeah he’s amaaaaaaaaaaazzzzzzzzzzzzzzeeeeeeeee balls yum yum

SoCalGal,

Westchester,

2 hours ago

Met him years ago in the 80′s, he is a perfect gentleman, a real class act, brilliant talent. Hope he continues to make music and concerts. Miss the Purple Prince.

Not me,

Las Vegas Nevada, United States,

3 hours ago

Prince can play the guitar very well, when he wants too.

DeckerWa,

Hooverville, United States,

3 hours ago

I’m sure 22 of his fans appreciated the brief heart attack.

Almine,

Gila Bend,

4 hours ago

An awesomely talented, but rather silly man,

ct1,

somewhere, United Kingdom,

5 hours ago

Is there an official video of his concert? If there isn’t, I can’t understand all the fuss. Can someone please explain how it works?
.

lilly-lu,

London, United Kingdom,

6 hours ago

Good grief….I thought he’d retired 20yrs ago. You’d think he’d be grateful for the publicity had no idea he was even still playing let alone coming over here. What an odd little man he has turned into.

Bchbtch,

East Coast,

7 hours ago

I was one of his biggest fans back in the 80′s; he is insanely talented. But he seems to have turned into an angry old man. He was so much more likeable when he was young and easy going. His music was better back then, too. :(

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

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Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2547850/Prince-drops-copyright-lawsuit-against-bloggers-accused-sharing-concert-footage-online.html

Making music videos ‘helps young cancer patients cope’ – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 29 January 2014 10:05 pm







CDsYoungsters made their own music video to show family and friends


Music therapy can help teenagers and young people cope better when faced with treatment for cancer, a study in Cancer journal suggests.

American researchers followed the experiences of a group of patients aged 11-24 as they produced a music video over three weeks.

They found the patients gained resilience and improved relationships with family and friends.

All the patients were undergoing high-risk stem-cell transplant treatments.

To produce their music videos, the young patients were asked to write song lyrics, record sounds and collect video images to create their story.

They were guided by a qualified music therapist who helped the patients identify what was important to them and how to communicate their ideas.

When completed, the videos were shared with family and friends through “premieres”.


Positive effect

After the sessions, the researchers found that the group that made music videos reported feeling more resilient and better able to cope with their treatment than another group not offered music therapy.



Start Quote

Adolescents and young people who are resilient have the ability to rise above their illness”


End Quote
Dr Joan Haase
Indiana University

Also, 100 days after treatment, the same group said they felt communication within their families was better and they were more connected with friends.

These are among several protective factors identified by researchers that they say help teenagers and young adults to cope in the face of cancer treatments.

Lead study author Dr Joan Haase, of Indiana University School of Nursing, said: “These protective factors influence the ways adolescents and young adults cope, gain hope and find meaning in the midst of their cancer journey.

“Adolescents and young people who are resilient have the ability to rise above their illness, gain a sense of mastery and confidence in how they have dealt with their cancer, and demonstrate a desire to reach out and help others.”

When researchers interviewed the patients’ parents, they found that the videos also gave them useful insights into their children’s cancer experiences.


‘Feel connected’

Sheri Robb, a music therapist who worked on the study, explained why music was particularly good at encouraging young people to engage.

She said: “When everything else is so uncertain, songs that are familiar to them are meaningful and make them feel connected.”

Cancer Research UK says music therapy can help people with cancer reduce their anxiety and improve their quality of life. It can also help to reduce some cancer symptoms and side-effects of treatment – but it cannot cure, treat or prevent any type of disease, including cancer.

Previous studies looking at the effects of music therapy on children with cancer found that it could help reduce fear and distress while improving family relationships.

A spokesperson for Teenage Cancer Trust said getting children with cancer to co-operate and communicate was most important.

“Every day in UK, around seven young people aged between 13 and 24 are diagnosed with cancer. We know that being treated alongside others their own age makes a huge difference to their whole experience, especially if it’s in an environment that allows young people with cancer to support each other.”

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25878958

Hidden hierarchy in string quartets revealed – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 29 January 2014 4:59 pm







String quartetStudying tiny changes in timing can reveal if a string quartet has a leader or not


Scientists have come up with a way to reveal the pecking order within a string quartet.

A team from the Royal Academy of Music and the University of Birmingham found that analysing how individual musicians vary their timing to follow the rest of the group can indicate a hierarchy.

They say it shows some quartets have a clear leader to ensure perfect harmony.

However, in other “democratic” quartets the musicians all follow each other, playing an equal role.

Prof Alan Wing, from the University of Birmingham, UK, said of the study, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface: “In one quartet, it was as if there was an autocracy. In the other, it was more like a democracy.”

Making changes

The subtle interactions within a string quartet can bring a performance to life, but the team says it is this interplay that reveals the hidden hierarchy.

To investigate, the researchers asked two well-established groups of chamber musicians to play a composition by Joseph Haydn.



Start Quote

She wasn’t correcting to the timing of the other players – the other players were correcting much more to her”


End Quote
Prof Alan Wing
University of Birmingham

Prof Wing said: “We took them into a recording room and we fitted their instruments up with little microphones under the strings very close to the bridge, which would pick up the sound from each of the players individually.”

The team analysed each musician’s timing as they played, and noted any tiny changes to the tempo.

They then looked at how these variations, which were in the order of one hundredth of a second, affected the rest of the group.

In one of the quartets, they found that three of the musicians were constantly having to speed up or slow down to stay in sync. However, the fourth player did not budge, letting the others adjust to her.

“The first violin was quite clearly providing a leadership,” explained Prof Wing.

“She wasn’t correcting to the timing of the other players – the other players were correcting much more to her.”

However, in the other quartet, all of the members altered their timing equally, suggesting a more democratic arrangement.

Prof Wing said: “There was no distinction between the first violin and the other players – they were all making equal corrections to each other.”

He added that the players were surprised to find that these kinds of hierarchies existed within their quartets. However, the musicians suspected that different pieces of music might alter the organisation within the group.

The scientists now want to find out if audiences notice a difference, and which performances they prefer.

They also want to discover whether similar hierarchies exist within other types of music.

Adrian Bradbury, a co-author from the Royal Academy of Music in London, said: ‘Live interaction between musicians on stage is often the most electrifying element of a performance, but remains one of the least well understood.

“I hope fellow musicians will agree that this method of ‘X-raying’ a performance to expose a group’s hierarchy will prove useful to us and fascinating to our audiences.”

Follow Rebecca on Twitter

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25934323

Making music videos ‘helps young cancer patients cope’ – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 29 January 2014 11:53 am







CDsYoungsters made their own music video to show family and friends


Music therapy can help teenagers and young people cope better when faced with treatment for cancer, a study in Cancer journal suggests.

American researchers followed the experiences of a group of patients aged 11-24 as they produced a music video over three weeks.

They found the patients gained resilience and improved relationships with family and friends.

All the patients were undergoing high-risk stem-cell transplant treatments.

To produce their music videos, the young patients were asked to write song lyrics, record sounds and collect video images to create their story.

They were guided by a qualified music therapist who helped the patients identify what was important to them and how to communicate their ideas.

When completed, the videos were shared with family and friends through “premieres”.


Positive effect

After the sessions, the researchers found that the group that made music videos reported feeling more resilient and better able to cope with their treatment than another group not offered music therapy.



Start Quote

Adolescents and young people who are resilient have the ability to rise above their illness”


End Quote
Dr Joan Haase
Indiana University

Also, 100 days after treatment, the same group said they felt communication within their families was better and they were more connected with friends.

These are among several protective factors identified by researchers that they say help teenagers and young adults to cope in the face of cancer treatments.

Lead study author Dr Joan Haase, of Indiana University School of Nursing, said: “These protective factors influence the ways adolescents and young adults cope, gain hope and find meaning in the midst of their cancer journey.

“Adolescents and young people who are resilient have the ability to rise above their illness, gain a sense of mastery and confidence in how they have dealt with their cancer, and demonstrate a desire to reach out and help others.”

When researchers interviewed the patients’ parents, they found that the videos also gave them useful insights into their children’s cancer experiences.


‘Feel connected’

Sheri Robb, a music therapist who worked on the study, explained why music was particularly good at encouraging young people to engage.

She said: “When everything else is so uncertain, songs that are familiar to them are meaningful and make them feel connected.”

Cancer Research UK says music therapy can help people with cancer reduce their anxiety and improve their quality of life. It can also help to reduce some cancer symptoms and side-effects of treatment – but it cannot cure, treat or prevent any type of disease, including cancer.

Previous studies looking at the effects of music therapy on children with cancer found that it could help reduce fear and distress while improving family relationships.

A spokesperson for Teenage Cancer Trust said getting children with cancer to co-operate and communicate was most important.

“Every day in UK, around seven young people aged between 13 and 24 are diagnosed with cancer. We know that being treated alongside others their own age makes a huge difference to their whole experience, especially if it’s in an environment that allows young people with cancer to support each other.”

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25878958

Making music videos ‘helps young cancer patients cope’ – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 29 January 2014 6:49 am







CDsYoungsters made their own music video to show family and friends


Music therapy can help teenagers and young people cope better when faced with treatment for cancer, a study in Cancer journal suggests.

American researchers followed the experiences of a group of patients aged 11-24 as they produced a music video over three weeks.

They found the patients gained resilience and improved relationships with family and friends.

All the patients were undergoing high-risk stem-cell transplant treatments.

To produce their music videos, the young patients were asked to write song lyrics, record sounds and collect video images to create their story.

They were guided by a qualified music therapist who helped the patients identify what was important to them and how to communicate their ideas.

When completed, the videos were shared with family and friends through “premieres”.


Positive effect

After the sessions, the researchers found that the group that made music videos reported feeling more resilient and better able to cope with their treatment than another group not offered music therapy.



Start Quote

Adolescents and young people who are resilient have the ability to rise above their illness”


End Quote
Dr Joan Haase
Indiana University

Also, 100 days after treatment, the same group said they felt communication within their families was better and they were more connected with friends.

These are among several protective factors identified by researchers that they say help teenagers and young adults to cope in the face of cancer treatments.

Lead study author Dr Joan Haase, of Indiana University School of Nursing, said: “These protective factors influence the ways adolescents and young adults cope, gain hope and find meaning in the midst of their cancer journey.

“Adolescents and young people who are resilient have the ability to rise above their illness, gain a sense of mastery and confidence in how they have dealt with their cancer, and demonstrate a desire to reach out and help others.”

When researchers interviewed the patients’ parents, they found that the videos also gave them useful insights into their children’s cancer experiences.


‘Feel connected’

Sheri Robb, a music therapist who worked on the study, explained why music was particularly good at encouraging young people to engage.

She said: “When everything else is so uncertain, songs that are familiar to them are meaningful and make them feel connected.”

Cancer Research UK says music therapy can help people with cancer reduce their anxiety and improve their quality of life. It can also help to reduce some cancer symptoms and side-effects of treatment – but it cannot cure, treat or prevent any type of disease, including cancer.

Previous studies looking at the effects of music therapy on children with cancer found that it could help reduce fear and distress while improving family relationships.

A spokesperson for Teenage Cancer Trust said getting children with cancer to co-operate and communicate was most important.

“Every day in UK, around seven young people aged between 13 and 24 are diagnosed with cancer. We know that being treated alongside others their own age makes a huge difference to their whole experience, especially if it’s in an environment that allows young people with cancer to support each other.”

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25878958

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