Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani in music video – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | viernes 29 noviembre 2013 6:21 am























Iran president in 'yes we can' video

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Watch an excerpt from the Iranian video








Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani has been featured in an online music video, entitled Nowsafar (New Journey).

It shows Mr Rouhani delivering a speech at his endorsement ceremony in Tehran on 3 August set to music, with Iranians singing or speaking his words.

Shot in black and white, it bears a close resemblance to the 2008 Yes We Can video, which featured one of Barack Obama’s presidential campaign speeches.

It comes 100 days since Mr Rouhani appointed his cabinet.

The lyrics of the song are based on Mr Rouhani’s first speech as president following his endorsement by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.



















will.i.am and Barack Obama

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Black-Eyed Peas rapper will.i.am led an all-star cast in the 2008 video








It begins: “Let us give all Iranians who love their country the opportunity to serve it. Let us allow elites to serve the nation. Let us allow the hearts to be cleansed from hatred.

“Let us have love, peace, and friendship instead of anger and antagonism. Let us allow Islam with its peaceful face, Iran with its rational face, the revolution with its humane face, and the establishment, with its affecting face, continue to create epics.”

The video features Iranian media personalities and men, women and children, with some of the cast using sign language.

The video was produced by Hoseyn Dehbashi who was also responsible for Mr Rouhani’s election campaign videos, according to a translation of the text posted on the video-sharing website Aparat.com.

In 2008, Black-Eyed Peas rapper will.i.am led an all-star cast in a music video inspired by a speech Barack Obama gave after the New Hampshire primary, before he was elected as US president.

That video garnered millions of hits on YouTube.


Twitter

A link to the video was tweeted from Mr Rouhani’s unofficial Twitter accounts: @Rouhani_ir in Persian and @HassanRouhani in English.

Mr Rouhani, whose campaign slogan was “moderation and wisdom”, has had a presence on Twitter since running for election.

But there has been some confusion over who is actually operating Mr Rouhani’s Twitter account.

The president’s Twitter handle has not been authenticated by Twitter, which puts a blue tick on profiles it confirms are genuine.

His office has told reporters that the account is controlled by those close to the president, and that he does not personally author the tweets.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-25117118

Open letter to Spike Lee pleads for copyright dispute intervention – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 8:16 pm

A freelance designer who says his work was stolen by an advertising agency working on the Hollywood remake of cult thriller Oldboy has written an open letter to director Spike Lee asking him to intervene.

Juan Luis Garcia says posters based on his designs are being used to promote the film, which is released this weekend in the US, despite the fact that he has not been paid for his work or agreed to their use. He says the unnamed agency involved made an “insultingly low offer” when it decided to use his designs, and continued to use them when he declined their offer.

“I make the same amount of money in a single day as a photo assistant as what they offered, and I had worked on these almost exclusively for two months,” writes Garcia in the letter. “We never signed any contracts or work-for-hire agreements and I certainly never agreed to donating or selling any copyright of my work without a licensing fee. I never even got paid the peanuts they owed me [for the original design pitches].”

Garcia says he was threatened with legal action when he complained about the agency’s actions. He made the decision to bring the matter to Lee’s attention when the film-maker began posting the designs, which feature star Josh Brolin, on his social media pages.

“I couldn’t believe that you had been using and claiming copyright on three of those very same posters I designed,” he writes. “I just couldn’t believe it. I perceive you as an advocate of the arts and artists and have a sinking feeling that you are as much of a victim in this as I am.”

Garcia added: “I know you’ll understand my story of an artist trying to make a dignified living. It’s difficult and sometimes seems impossible because everyone wants you to work for free or for ‘exposure’.”

Interviewed by the Hollywood Reporter, the designer said his letter was a final attempt to resolve the issue prior to legal action. “I don’t want to sue anyone, it’s not in my nature, but if that’s what it comes down to, so be it,” he said. “I’m thrilled he liked the posters and hope they continue using them, but I need to be remunerated.”

The new version of Oldboy, loosely adapted from South Korean director Park Chan-wook‘s blistering revenge tale, has so far met with lukewarm reviews and is predicted to perform weakly at the box office. It centres on the release of a kidnapped man held prisoner in solitary confinement for 20 years.

Wrote the Guardian’s Tom Shone: “The timing of this film seems both unfortunate and salutary. In this banner year for black film-makers, taking on subjects as great as slavery and the civil rights movement, here comes Spike Lee, without whose example none of their films would exist in quite the form they do, and what has he got for us? Some karate moves, fancy camerawork, and a wink-wink cameo for a cephalopod.”

Lee has not yet made any public comment on Luis Garcia’s letter.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/nov/28/spike-lee-open-letter-oldboy-designs

Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani in music video – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 8:16 pm























Iran president in 'yes we can' video

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.










Watch an excerpt from the Iranian video








Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani has been featured in an online music video, entitled Nowsafar (New Journey).

It shows Mr Rouhani delivering a speech at his endorsement ceremony in Tehran on 3 August set to music, with Iranians singing or speaking his words.

Shot in black and white, it bears a close resemblance to the 2008 Yes We Can video, which featured one of Barack Obama’s presidential campaign speeches.

It comes 100 days since Mr Rouhani appointed his cabinet.

The lyrics of the song are based on Mr Rouhani’s first speech as president following his endorsement by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.



















will.i.am and Barack Obama

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.










Black-Eyed Peas rapper will.i.am led an all-star cast in the 2008 video








It begins: “Let us give all Iranians who love their country the opportunity to serve it. Let us allow elites to serve the nation. Let us allow the hearts to be cleansed from hatred.

“Let us have love, peace, and friendship instead of anger and antagonism. Let us allow Islam with its peaceful face, Iran with its rational face, the revolution with its humane face, and the establishment, with its affecting face, continue to create epics.”

The video features Iranian media personalities and men, women and children, with some of the cast using sign language.

The video was produced by Hoseyn Dehbashi who was also responsible for Mr Rouhani’s election campaign videos, according to a translation of the text posted on the video-sharing website Aparat.com.

In 2008, Black-Eyed Peas rapper will.i.am led an all-star cast in a music video inspired by a speech Barack Obama gave after the New Hampshire primary, before he was elected as US president.

That video garnered millions of hits on YouTube.


Twitter

A link to the video was tweeted from Mr Rouhani’s unofficial Twitter accounts: @Rouhani_ir in Persian and @HassanRouhani in English.

Mr Rouhani, whose campaign slogan was “moderation and wisdom”, has had a presence on Twitter since running for election.

But there has been some confusion over who is actually operating Mr Rouhani’s Twitter account.

The president’s Twitter handle has not been authenticated by Twitter, which puts a blue tick on profiles it confirms are genuine.

His office has told reporters that the account is controlled by those close to the president, and that he does not personally author the tweets.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-25117118

Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani in music video – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 3:14 pm























Iran president in 'yes we can' video

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.










Watch an excerpt from the Iranian video








Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani has been featured in an online music video, entitled Nowsafar (New Journey).

It shows Mr Rouhani delivering a speech at his endorsement ceremony in Tehran on 3 August set to music, with Iranians singing or speaking his words.

Shot in black and white, it bears a close resemblance to the 2008 Yes We Can video, which featured one of Barack Obama’s presidential campaign speeches.

It comes 100 days since Mr Rouhani appointed his cabinet.

The lyrics of the song are based on Mr Rouhani’s first speech as president following his endorsement by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.



















will.i.am and Barack Obama

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.










Black-Eyed Peas rapper will.i.am led an all-star cast in the 2008 video








It begins: “Let us give all Iranians who love their country the opportunity to serve it. Let us allow elites to serve the nation. Let us allow the hearts to be cleansed from hatred.

“Let us have love, peace, and friendship instead of anger and antagonism. Let us allow Islam with its peaceful face, Iran with its rational face, the revolution with its humane face, and the establishment, with its affecting face, continue to create epics.”

The video features Iranian media personalities and men, women and children, with some of the cast using sign language.

The video was produced by Hoseyn Dehbashi who was also responsible for Mr Rouhani’s election campaign videos, according to a translation of the text posted on the video-sharing website Aparat.com.

In 2008, Black-Eyed Peas rapper will.i.am led an all-star cast in a music video inspired by a speech Barack Obama gave after the New Hampshire primary, before he was elected as US president.

That video garnered millions of hits on YouTube.


Twitter

A link to the video was tweeted from Mr Rouhani’s unofficial Twitter accounts: @Rouhani_ir in Persian and @HassanRouhani in English.

Mr Rouhani, whose campaign slogan was “moderation and wisdom”, has had a presence on Twitter since running for election.

But there has been some confusion over who is actually operating Mr Rouhani’s Twitter account.

The president’s Twitter handle has not been authenticated by Twitter, which puts a blue tick on profiles it confirms are genuine.

His office has told reporters that the account is controlled by those close to the president, and that he does not personally author the tweets.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-25117118

The Halle orchestra get creative to make music pay – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 3:14 pm







Halle corporate choirHalle choir leaders have been training six companies for the competition


The Halle orchestra is taking a leaf out of celebrity choirmaster Gareth Malone’s book and holding its first corporate choir competition. The Halle has trained six office choirs in an attempt to use its musical expertise to make up for funding cuts.

In technology companies, finance firms and transport offices across the north-west of England, unusual sounds have been coming from meeting rooms during lunch breaks in recent months.

The sound of singing is unusual, that is, compared with the normal office din of rattling keyboards and conversations about contracts.

The six office choirs, who have all been coached by the Halle, will hope to be on song when they do battle at The Halle’s corporate choir contest in Manchester on Friday.

The prize is an opportunity to perform with the full orchestra and it is all part of an attempt by the Halle to find new ways of using its artistic excellence in making money.

The office choirs have essentially been teambuilding endeavours, with secretaries and senior executives coming together in (almost) perfect harmony.


Halle OrchestraThe Halle is one of the UK’s oldest symphony orchestras

If the companies involved decide they have benefited from the experience, the hope is that they may pay the Halle to continue running their choirs, or even become more deeply involved in sponsoring the orchestra.

Between 2010 and 2015, the Halle will lose between £400,000 and £500,000 from its local council and Arts Council England grants. It hopes to make up at least half of that shortfall through money-spinning schemes like the corporate choirs.

“Of course, at the moment when public finances are strained, we need to do everything we can to increase our income from earned sources,” Halle chief executive John Summers says.

“We’re trying to find lots of new ways to create income in order to support the art that we do.”

Five of the six office choirs are relatively new, but the Halle has been training singers in the headquarters of technology firm Siemens for the past two years.

At their final rehearsal before the contest, 20 colleagues were being put through their paces by Halle choir leader Stuart Overington.


Start Quote

Arts organisations are having to be more creative about who they talk to and how they talk to them in terms of getting money”


End Quote
Philip Spedding
Arts & Business

Caron Eastwood, a personal assistant who has worked for the company for 18 years, says she likes the choir sessions because she feels part of a group.

“It lifts you up for the day,” she says. “The division I work in is quite small but it makes me feel as if I’m contributing to part of the company.”

The company’s financial director Robin Phillips is also in the choir. He says it brings together some colleagues who would never normally meet.

“It’s been noticeable how you can motivate a team of people who are out of their comfort zone and through really tactical motivation and encouragement get them to a given goal,” he says.

“It’s been staggering how what we do with the choir can also relate to what we do at the office.”

Using the arts in training and teambuilding is not new. But as grants are cut, more cultural organisations are thinking about new ways to use their artistic assets.

As well as the Halle, the London Symphony Orchestra runs choirs for City of London sponsors and the Royal Northern Sinfonia offers to visit offices to set up ukulele bands and tin whistle orchestras.

Meanwhile, theatres from the National Theatre to The Lowry in Salford offer actors and directors to train executives in the art of communication and leadership.


Manchester Camerata musicians are taking part in music therapy sessions in care homesManchester Camerata musicians are taking part in music therapy sessions in care homes

“Arts organisations are having to be more creative about who they talk to and how they talk to them in terms of getting money,” says Philip Spedding, chief executive of Arts & Business.

“But for a number of them it’s about more than just that – it’s about showing that the arts can make a difference in communities, and those communities can be where employees come together.”

One company even got its employees to stage an opera as a teambuilding exercise, he says. But this form of fund-raising will not be open to all arts organisations.

“There are natural challenges for arts organisations in rural communities or in parts of the country where the business community has been particularly hard hit. Likewise there are artforms where this is more challenging.”

Another orchestra using its artistic experience to raise revenue is the Manchester Camerata, which has signed a deal with private care home operator Care UK to provide musicians for music therapy sessions from next spring.

That follows a similar project in which players from the chamber orchestra have taken part in therapy sessions for dementia sufferers in and around Manchester.

Manchester Camerata chief executive Bob Riley says the sessions were set up because music can have health benefits for care home residents. He also realised the skills could have a commercial value.

“As a business, we are looking at different ways to increase and vary our sources of income,” Mr Riley says. “We all know the environment we’re in – there’s not a tremendous amount of money in the public purse.

“And we know there are other ways we can be relevant in today’s society. Health is one of them, [and] within schools, communities, all sorts of places, so we’re trying to work with all sorts of partners who have a new perspective.”

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-25121347

Now That’s What I Call Music! Happy 30th birthday – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 3:14 pm

The phenomenon was launched by some upstart named Richard Branson, owner of
hairy hippie-run label Virgin. How that first album got its name is a rather
sweet story. Branson frequently visited a bric-a-brac shop near Virgin HQ on
Portobello Road, just because he fancied a girl who worked there. Eventually
he had to buy something and stumbled across a 1920s poster advertising
Danish bacon. It depicted a chicken singing as it lays an egg, while an
enraptured pig declares: “Now that’s what I call music.” Branson bought it,
hung it on the office wall and the rest is pop history.

The pig became the mascot of the Now albums and Branson went on to marry the
girl in the antiques shop, Joan Templeman. Meanwhile, the Now series settled
into a rhythm of three releases per year and grew from its humble roots to
sell 100m albums – five times more than the Beatles and outstripping most of
the artists who’ve ever appeared on it.

The latest in the series, Now 86, was released last week – right on time to
capitalise on the Christmas market. The tracklisting is dominated by pop
princesses – Cyrus, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Ellie Goulding, Jessie J – with
the Arctic Monkeys sticking out like a sore thumb. There’s also One
Direction, Lily Allen’s John Lewis ad song and that novelty “What Does The
Fox Say?” monstrosity. In short, a textbook Now musical grab-bag.

Comment: The
10 worst pop songs

The story of Now is also the story of how we consume music. The albums were
originally double vinyl or cassette. CD was introduced in 1987 and soon
became the dominant format – partly due to its capacity, meaning they could
increase the tracks from 30-odd to 40-plus. Vinyl was phased out in 1996,
cassette a decade later. Minidisc was briefly available between 1999 and
2001. The first to be released as a digital download was Now 62 in 2005.

Surprisingly for something so shamelessly mainstream, Now albums have become
prized by collectors and completists. The last vinyl release, Now 35, is
worth at least £50. CDs from the 80s can fetch up to £500. Despite its
chart-obsessed cheesiness, the franchise has found a zealous cult following,
with Facebook groups, fan forums and YouTube channels dedicated to grainy
VHS tapings of old TV ads.

Perhaps it inspires such devotion because it is pop’s equivalent of Hansard or
Wisden – a nostalgia-inducing document of the past. Stuffed with songs which
induce a Proustian rush, whisking us back to our youth and making us come
over all misty-eyed. They’re the soundtrack to our lives and your favourite
is always your first.

So what next for this newly 30something phenomenon? Well, Spotify, iTunes and
digital downloads were supposed to signal the death of the compilation.
However, sales recently shot up for the first time in a decade and last
year, 20.6m were shifted in the UK.

Faced with so much online choice, perhaps punters are rediscovering the
simple, convenient pleasures of a compilation. Indeed, downloads are
powering the renaissance. Compilations are the fastest-growing sector of the
digital album market and a quarter of compilations sold are now downloads.
Naturally, Now continues to dominate, taking all four top places last year.
There’s life in the old pig yet.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to put my back out breakdancing to the Rock
Steady Crew.

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/rockandpopmusic/10478974/Now-Thats-What-I-Call-Music-Happy-30th-birthday.html

Jukebox jury: music’s five weirdest legal disputes – The Guardian (blog)

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 3:14 pm

Beastie Boys have gone to war over girls. Or rather, they’ve gone to war over Girls, their 1987 song, which is at the centre of a legal dispute after toymaker GoldieBlox recorded a parody of the track to advertise their construction kit toys.

Now I know what most of you are thinking, and no doubt it runs something like: “Copyright infringement is a tricky issue that sh- … wow, that Princess Machine advert looks pretty cool! It’s made out of teacups and dolls and at one point it opens a garage door using a trombone and an ironing board!”

And you’d be right – in fact, it was inspired by Rube Goldberg, with the premise being that girls’ toys are too pink and boring, and don’t unleash a child’s creativity quite like toys for boys. This ties in with the song, of course. The Beastie Boys‘ original was arguably influenced little by the gains of the feminist movement: “Girls – to do the dishes! Girls – to clean up my room! Girls – to do the laundry!” GoldieBlox’s song subverts this message, with lyrics such as: “Girls! You think you know what we want? Girls! Pink and pretty just like the 50s? … it’s time to change! We deserve to see a range! Cos all our toys look the same! We deserve to use our brains!”

In fact, GoldieBlox insist that their song constitutes “fair use” because it’s a parody of the “highly sexist song”. Which also makes you think. Specifically, it makes you think: “Recording parodies introduce an interesting legal dynamic in which … oh wow, GoldieBlox games are pretty cool … you can make miniature dogs spin around on a roundabout and … oh, I’m doing it again, aren’t I?”

Of course, such thoughts are kind of the point. There is, after all, a lot of decent publicity to be gained from a legal dispute. Such as being included in a Guardian music blog about music’s five weirdest legal disputes. Speaking of which …

Bill Wyman sued for being Bill Wyman

Possibly fed up with people thinking he was spending his time writing 160-word capsule reviews of Lost Natives records, in 2002 the former Rolling Stone embarked on an audacious mission to sue someone for having the same name as him. Especially audacious as the Bay Area writer was born Bill Wyman, whereas the Rolling Stone adopted it as a stage name. To make matters more confusing, Bill Wyman (the writer) recently reviewed Keith Richards’ autobiography from the perspective of Mick Jagger. Too much!

Vanilla Ice’s legal case not helped by his own singing

At first the Iceman declareth that he didn’t sample Queen and David Bowie‘s Under Pressure. Then he said it was a joke. This interview, where he sings two identical basslines in order to prove how different they are, can be considered one of the first examples of trolling. Unsurprisingly, he was made to credit Freddie Mercury and Bowie for their work, although the case never made it to court.

George Michael sued by policeman who arrested him

As if arresting George Michael in a toilet wasn’t enough, police officer Marcelo Rodriguez went on to sue him for slander after Michael satirised the incident in a video and made comments alleging that the police officer had used entrapment. The courts eventually ruled that, because Rodriguez was a public official, he was not entitled to recover damages for emotional distress.

The legal case that prompted a novelty record

The Recording Industry Association of America accusing a file-transfer site of piracy didn’t have obvious potential for being the most LOLs legal case on Earth. But it did lead to a surprisingly catchy song in which will.i.am, Kanye, Macy Gray and others joined forces to sing lines like: “When I got to send files across the globe … I use Megaupload.” (The video itself prompted Universal to request a takedown … some people just can’t get enough legal thrills.) Even after the Bound 2 video, this is the silliest thing in which Kanye’s ever been involved.

The guy who didn’t earn much money from Money

Barrett Strong’s classic Money (That’s What I Want) might have generated bathtubs full of the stuff since it was recorded in 1959, but it didn’t do too much for Strong’s bank balance. A quirk of US copyright law means that the United States Copyright Office doesn’t notify authors of changes in registrations. Strong had his credit removed by Motown Records three years after the song was released – and removed a second time shortly after the copyright was renewed in 1987. Until recently, the only way a songwriter would have been able to check the records was, apparently, to personally visit the archives in Washington. Berry Gordy now says it’s too late to contest, which makes this a case of what happens when you don’t embark on a ridiculous legal dispute.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2013/nov/26/music-five-weirdest-legal-disputes-beastie-boys

Now That’s What I Call Music! Happy 30th birthday – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 10:07 am

The phenomenon was launched by some upstart named Richard Branson, owner of
hairy hippie-run label Virgin. How that first album got its name is a rather
sweet story. Branson frequently visited a bric-a-brac shop near Virgin HQ on
Portobello Road, just because he fancied a girl who worked there. Eventually
he had to buy something and stumbled across a 1920s poster advertising
Danish bacon. It depicted a chicken singing as it lays an egg, while an
enraptured pig declares: “Now that’s what I call music.” Branson bought it,
hung it on the office wall and the rest is pop history.

The pig became the mascot of the Now albums and Branson went on to marry the
girl in the antiques shop, Joan Templeman. Meanwhile, the Now series settled
into a rhythm of three releases per year and grew from its humble roots to
sell 100m albums – five times more than the Beatles and outstripping most of
the artists who’ve ever appeared on it.

The latest in the series, Now 86, was released last week – right on time to
capitalise on the Christmas market. The tracklisting is dominated by pop
princesses – Cyrus, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Ellie Goulding, Jessie J – with
the Arctic Monkeys sticking out like a sore thumb. There’s also One
Direction, Lily Allen’s John Lewis ad song and that novelty “What Does The
Fox Say?” monstrosity. In short, a textbook Now musical grab-bag.

Comment: The
10 worst pop songs

The story of Now is also the story of how we consume music. The albums were
originally double vinyl or cassette. CD was introduced in 1987 and soon
became the dominant format – partly due to its capacity, meaning they could
increase the tracks from 30-odd to 40-plus. Vinyl was phased out in 1996,
cassette a decade later. Minidisc was briefly available between 1999 and
2001. The first to be released as a digital download was Now 62 in 2005.

Surprisingly for something so shamelessly mainstream, Now albums have become
prized by collectors and completists. The last vinyl release, Now 35, is
worth at least £50. CDs from the 80s can fetch up to £500. Despite its
chart-obsessed cheesiness, the franchise has found a zealous cult following,
with Facebook groups, fan forums and YouTube channels dedicated to grainy
VHS tapings of old TV ads.

Perhaps it inspires such devotion because it is pop’s equivalent of Hansard or
Wisden – a nostalgia-inducing document of the past. Stuffed with songs which
induce a Proustian rush, whisking us back to our youth and making us come
over all misty-eyed. They’re the soundtrack to our lives and your favourite
is always your first.

So what next for this newly 30something phenomenon? Well, Spotify, iTunes and
digital downloads were supposed to signal the death of the compilation.
However, sales recently shot up for the first time in a decade and last
year, 20.6m were shifted in the UK.

Faced with so much online choice, perhaps punters are rediscovering the
simple, convenient pleasures of a compilation. Indeed, downloads are
powering the renaissance. Compilations are the fastest-growing sector of the
digital album market and a quarter of compilations sold are now downloads.
Naturally, Now continues to dominate, taking all four top places last year.
There’s life in the old pig yet.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to put my back out breakdancing to the Rock
Steady Crew.

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/rockandpopmusic/10478974/Now-Thats-What-I-Call-Music-Happy-30th-birthday.html

Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani in music video – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 10:07 am























Iran president in 'yes we can' video

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.










Watch an excerpt from the Iranian video








Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani has been featured in an online music video, entitled Nowsafar (New Journey).

It shows Mr Rouhani delivering a speech at his endorsement ceremony in Tehran on 3 August set to music, with Iranians singing or speaking his words.

Shot in black and white, it bears a close resemblance to the 2008 Yes We Can video, which featured one of Barack Obama’s presidential campaign speeches.

It comes 100 days since Mr Rouhani appointed his cabinet.

The lyrics of the song are based on Mr Rouhani’s first speech as president following his endorsement by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.



















will.i.am and Barack Obama

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.










Black-Eyed Peas rapper will.i.am led an all-star cast in the 2008 video








It begins: “Let us give all Iranians who love their country the opportunity to serve it. Let us allow elites to serve the nation. Let us allow the hearts to be cleansed from hatred.

“Let us have love, peace, and friendship instead of anger and antagonism. Let us allow Islam with its peaceful face, Iran with its rational face, the revolution with its humane face, and the establishment, with its affecting face, continue to create epics.”

The video features Iranian media personalities and men, women and children, with some of the cast using sign language.

The video was produced by Hoseyn Dehbashi who was also responsible for Mr Rouhani’s election campaign videos, according to a translation of the text posted on the video-sharing website Aparat.com.

In 2008, Black-Eyed Peas rapper will.i.am led an all-star cast in a music video inspired by a speech Barack Obama gave after the New Hampshire primary, before he was elected as US president.

That video garnered millions of hits on YouTube.


Twitter

A link to the video was tweeted from Mr Rouhani’s unofficial Twitter accounts: @Rouhani_ir in Persian and @HassanRouhani in English.

Mr Rouhani, whose campaign slogan was “moderation and wisdom”, has had a presence on Twitter since running for election.

But there has been some confusion over who is actually operating Mr Rouhani’s Twitter account.

The president’s Twitter handle has not been authenticated by Twitter, which puts a blue tick on profiles it confirms are genuine.

His office has told reporters that the account is controlled by those close to the president, and that he does not personally author the tweets.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-25117118

Jukebox jury: music’s five weirdest legal disputes – The Guardian (blog)

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 28 noviembre 2013 10:07 am

Beastie Boys have gone to war over girls. Or rather, they’ve gone to war over Girls, their 1987 song, which is at the centre of a legal dispute after toymaker GoldieBlox recorded a parody of the track to advertise their construction kit toys.

Now I know what most of you are thinking, and no doubt it runs something like: “Copyright infringement is a tricky issue that sh- … wow, that Princess Machine advert looks pretty cool! It’s made out of teacups and dolls and at one point it opens a garage door using a trombone and an ironing board!”

And you’d be right – in fact, it was inspired by Rube Goldberg, with the premise being that girls’ toys are too pink and boring, and don’t unleash a child’s creativity quite like toys for boys. This ties in with the song, of course. The Beastie Boys‘ original was arguably influenced little by the gains of the feminist movement: “Girls – to do the dishes! Girls – to clean up my room! Girls – to do the laundry!” GoldieBlox’s song subverts this message, with lyrics such as: “Girls! You think you know what we want? Girls! Pink and pretty just like the 50s? … it’s time to change! We deserve to see a range! Cos all our toys look the same! We deserve to use our brains!”

In fact, GoldieBlox insist that their song constitutes “fair use” because it’s a parody of the “highly sexist song”. Which also makes you think. Specifically, it makes you think: “Recording parodies introduce an interesting legal dynamic in which … oh wow, GoldieBlox games are pretty cool … you can make miniature dogs spin around on a roundabout and … oh, I’m doing it again, aren’t I?”

Of course, such thoughts are kind of the point. There is, after all, a lot of decent publicity to be gained from a legal dispute. Such as being included in a Guardian music blog about music’s five weirdest legal disputes. Speaking of which …

Bill Wyman sued for being Bill Wyman

Possibly fed up with people thinking he was spending his time writing 160-word capsule reviews of Lost Natives records, in 2002 the former Rolling Stone embarked on an audacious mission to sue someone for having the same name as him. Especially audacious as the Bay Area writer was born Bill Wyman, whereas the Rolling Stone adopted it as a stage name. To make matters more confusing, Bill Wyman (the writer) recently reviewed Keith Richards’ autobiography from the perspective of Mick Jagger. Too much!

Vanilla Ice’s legal case not helped by his own singing

At first the Iceman declareth that he didn’t sample Queen and David Bowie‘s Under Pressure. Then he said it was a joke. This interview, where he sings two identical basslines in order to prove how different they are, can be considered one of the first examples of trolling. Unsurprisingly, he was made to credit Freddie Mercury and Bowie for their work, although the case never made it to court.

George Michael sued by policeman who arrested him

As if arresting George Michael in a toilet wasn’t enough, police officer Marcelo Rodriguez went on to sue him for slander after Michael satirised the incident in a video and made comments alleging that the police officer had used entrapment. The courts eventually ruled that, because Rodriguez was a public official, he was not entitled to recover damages for emotional distress.

The legal case that prompted a novelty record

The Recording Industry Association of America accusing a file-transfer site of piracy didn’t have obvious potential for being the most LOLs legal case on Earth. But it did lead to a surprisingly catchy song in which will.i.am, Kanye, Macy Gray and others joined forces to sing lines like: “When I got to send files across the globe … I use Megaupload.” (The video itself prompted Universal to request a takedown … some people just can’t get enough legal thrills.) Even after the Bound 2 video, this is the silliest thing in which Kanye’s ever been involved.

The guy who didn’t earn much money from Money

Barrett Strong’s classic Money (That’s What I Want) might have generated bathtubs full of the stuff since it was recorded in 1959, but it didn’t do too much for Strong’s bank balance. A quirk of US copyright law means that the United States Copyright Office doesn’t notify authors of changes in registrations. Strong had his credit removed by Motown Records three years after the song was released – and removed a second time shortly after the copyright was renewed in 1987. Until recently, the only way a songwriter would have been able to check the records was, apparently, to personally visit the archives in Washington. Berry Gordy now says it’s too late to contest, which makes this a case of what happens when you don’t embark on a ridiculous legal dispute.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2013/nov/26/music-five-weirdest-legal-disputes-beastie-boys

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