The haunting music that takes you back 1800 years: Expert records ‘100 … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 29 octubre 2013 3:06 am
  • Musical rhythms were preserved in the patterns of words of ancient texts
  • Instruments used are known from paintings and archaeological remains
  • Ancient documents found on stone reveal how the pitch should have risen
  • Dr D’Angour claims the ‘magical’ recordings are 100% accurate

By
Ellie Zolfagharifard

16:19 GMT, 28 October 2013


|

16:22 GMT, 28 October 2013

The beautiful texts of ancient Greece have captivated our imaginations for thousands of years.  

From the tragedies of Sophocles to the epics of Homer, modern literature throughout the world continues to be inspired by these classics.

But the haunting music these poems were originally sung to have long since been lost, with researchers instead focusing on the meaning of the words.

Scroll down to listen to the music…

The music of ancient Greece, which hasn't been heard for more than 2,000 years, is being reconstructed by Armand D'Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University

The music of ancient Greece, which hasn’t been heard for more than 2,000 years, is being reconstructed by Armand D’Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University

Now an expert from Oxford University has reconstructed the music, and rediscovered some of the instruments that played them – and he claims the recordings are 100 per cent accurate.

‘There is no question that we can reconstruct what this fascinating music sounded like,’ Dr Armand D’Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University, told MailOnline.

‘We have been left with clear instructions, thousands of years old, about how to create instruments used to play the music with mathematical precision.’

A fresco painting from Pompeii, Italy.

One of the great Greek lyrists and few known female poets of the ancient world, Sappho was born some time between 630 and 612 BC. Her love poetry would have been composed to music, such as the tune heard above

The result, according to Dr D’Angour, is ‘something quite magical’ which may sound odd to our ears, but was hugely popular with audiences at the time.

To reconstruct the music, Dr D’Angour and his team put together existing clues about the tunes, rhythms and the instruments of the time.

The rhythms, for instance, are preserved in the patterns of long and short syllables in the words of the texts themselves.

The instruments used – such as lyre and reed-pipes –  are known from, paintings and archaeological remains.

An illustration from The Odyssey

The instruments used – such as lyre and reed-pipes – are known from, paintings and archaeological remains, such as this illustration from The Odyssey by Homer

A replica of a Biblical harp in a museum in Haifa
Seiklos

The lyre (left) is a string instrument known for its use in Greek classical antiquity and later. The right image shows the Seikilos epitaph, the oldest surviving example of a complete musical composition. The song is in the ancient Greek musical notation, was found engraved on a tombstone, near Aidin, Turkey

A SONG FROM 200 AD

Some of the surviving melodies are immediately attractive to a modern ear, said Dr D’Angrour.

One complete piece, inscribed on a marble column and dating from around 200 AD, is a haunting short song of four lines composed by Seikilos.

The words of the song may be translated as:

While you’re alive, shine:

Never let your mood decline.

We’ve a brief span of life to spend:

Time necessitates an end.

Meanwhile, ancient documents found on stone in Greece and papyrus in Egypt, reveal exactly how the pitch should have risen throughout the composition.

Inscribed with a vocal notation devised around 450 BC, the documents show alphabetic letters and signs placed above the vowels of the Greek words that reveal the mathematical ratios of musical intervals.

Dr D’Angour said that similar music to that played in ancient Greece can today found in the folk music traditions of Sardinia and Turkey, providing an insight into the sounds and techniques used.

For instance, in ancient Greece, a musical note would go up in pitch on certain syllables and fall on others, rather than being stressed.

Detail from the Ambrosian Iliad

‘One of the things Greeks were fascinating by at all times was the notion of imitation,’ said Dr D’Angour. Pictured is artwork from the Ambrosian Iliad, a 5th century illuminated manuscript of the Iliad of Homer, depicting a battle scene. This poem may would have been set to music to enhance the emotions it evoked

The music of this period also used delicate intervals such as quarter-tones, and the melody was often different to the vocal pitches used in the poems.

‘We’re talking about a period of around 1000 years so there was lots of different styles and sounds that many of which would have been lost,’ said Dr D’Angour.

‘In so far as we’re aware of different sounds the earliest music, say from 5th C BC, are more alien to us that the later music from 200 AD, which sounds a bit like early church melodies.’

Dr D’Angour has only just begun his collaborative two-year project, at the end of which he hopes to uncover exactly what music meant to ancient Greeks.

‘One of the things Greeks were fascinating by at all times was the notion of imitation,’ said Dr D’Angour.

‘The idea that they could find auditory phenomena that could imitate emotion meant that the music had to feel like it had some kind of enhanced meaning.

‘Some of it absolutely haunting but one of the things I feel most of all is that it’s amazing to hear music that hasn’t been heard for 2,000 years.’

The comments below have not been moderated.

Capt Dan,

jupiter,

27 minutes ago

“he claims the recordings are 100 per cent accurate.” Umm, not too many people left to dispute this are there? 100% is a bit too strong for my taste. There are mistakes made in transcribing music that’s just a few decades old. Interesting work though.

Moochie,

Canton,

44 minutes ago

Beats Rap

MigV2131313,

NYNY, United States,

1 hour ago

Maybe you had to be there to fully appreciate it but it sounds just as good as the Incredible String Band and that was only 40 years or so ago.

Stewski,

Hexthorpe, United Kingdom,

2 hours ago

It sounded nothing like it.

bhqz,

Tennessee USA,

2 hours ago

Well, it’s not KISS…

Woody Adopter,

London, United Kingdom,

3 hours ago

Opah!!! lol

Dame Em,

Tickle on the Tum,

6 hours ago

The ancient Greeks worshipped poets and music hence the tales of Orpheus and Sappho. I don’t believe for a moment this is an accurate representation of their musical culture , the proff has probably only succeeded in piecing together an ancient Greek version of chop sticks.

Mandark,

Derby,

6 hours ago

Fake!! lol

DVM,

Neenah,

6 hours ago

How does he know it’s 100% accurate? Does he have a time machine?

firestorm,

London, United Kingdom,

39 minutes ago

How do you know Mozart is accurate? Because of a notation system – he’s decoded the ancient Greek notation system. Read the article next time dummy.

Puddleduck,

This side of the pond,

7 hours ago

Chill – Liked the Ancient stuff ——- Can’t compete with Bob Marley though :)

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Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2478381/The-haunting-music-takes-1-800-years-Expert-records-100-accurate-version-song-heard-ancient-Greece.html

Lou Reed created music that will live on for as long as songs are sung – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | lunes 28 octubre 2013 1:53 am

Lou Reed (bottom left) with The Velvet Underground and Nico (front,
centre)

As a young man growing up in relatively affluent circumstances in New York in
the Fifties and Sixties, he had a very difficult relationship with his
family and suffered incarceration in mental institutions and
electroconvulsive therapy supposedly to cure him of bisexual tendencies.

He poured all his energies into rock and roll, concocting a literary street
style that was distinctively contemporary. With the Velvet Underground in
1966, Reed struck out against the prevailing mood of flower power by
creating urban tableaux mired in the dark appeal of hard drugs,
sadomasochism, prostitution and gender-bending, matching the complexity of
his lyrics with a bold, dark sonic palette.

The Velvets only released four albums before breaking up in 1971, radio
ignored them and not many people bought them, but with their Warhol endorsed
chic, poisonous attitude, atonal vocals, shuddering rhythms and thrashy
distorting guitars, they became godfathers of art rock, punk, indie and
Goth.

Cited as inspiration by David Bowie, Roxy Music and The Sex Pistols, the
Velvet template can be detected in every band who have favoured noise,
attitude, experimentalism (and perhaps the vampiric appeal of wearing
sunglasses at night) over ordinary commercial criteria.

It is probably fair to say that no other band ever achieved so little success
in their time and yet exerted such a vast influence on those who followed.

Reed’s solo career was enormously varied and wildly erratic, from the glam
rock meets music hall triumph of 1972’s ‘Transformer’ (produced by David
Bowie) to the freeform heavy metal operatics of Lulu
(made with Metallica
in 2011). He divided critics but declared himself unmoved.

“Who cares?” he snapped, when I mentioned the confused critical response
during an encounter in Paris in 2011. “I could give two s—-. I never wrote
for them then, I don’t write for them now, I have no interest in what they
have to say about anything. I write for me.”

Reed was a notoriously difficult interview subject with a reputation for being
insulting, evasive, and sometimes just monosyllabic. But the last time I met
him, I got a surprising sense of the vulnerability underpinning Reed’s
surliness, as this now rather frail, bespectacled old man reached out to ask
me to champion his unloved latest album.

“I was trying to escape the simplistic form, and find a different kind of
melodic form, but still rock … All this stuff is about emotion, I mean, why
else do it?” Gripping my arm, tightly, and staring into my eyes, he started
to recite Macbeth’s famous monologue in a low drawling voice.

“Out, out brief candle, life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, that
struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more.”

He wanted me to understand that what he was aspiring to was the very highest
form of timeless art, that he wanted to be Shakespeare rather than Elvis.

“Hey, if I could get there, climb that particular ladder. It would be a
bitch,” he told me. “You have to pass through blood to get there, wherever
it is.”

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/10407808/Lou-Reed-created-music-that-will-live-on-for-as-long-as-songs-are-sung.html

Girls allowed? The women on top in the music industry – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | domingo 27 octubre 2013 5:49 am

It’s been a giddy few months for women in pop. If you haven’t been living in a cave, you may have heard about Miley Cyrus swinging naked on a wrecking ball, and Sinéad O’Connor’s subsequent open letter to the former child star. “The music business doesn’t give a shit about you,” O’Connor wrote. “They will prostitute you for all you are worth.”

Another former child star reacted to the Miley/Sinéad saga later – Charlotte Church, in an hour-long Peel lecture for 6 Music. The male-dominated music business had “a juvenile perspective on gender”, she railed, before slamming how acceptable this state had become. She added: “the culture of demeaning women in pop music is so ingrained as to have become routine, from the way we are dealt with by management and labels, to the way we are presented to the public.”

But behind the scenes on Planet Pop, women also work. They’re in the minority, as Church acknowledged, but they also direct videos, produce records and develop artists’ careers. Director Diane Martel may have defended her video for Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines – topless girls were in a “power position”, she said, if they stared at a camera while strutting near fully clothed men – but many other female voices haven’t been heard, until now.

As a journalist who has encountered some sexism in her own career (being directed to put more shoes and less debate in my feminist pop culture site, the Lipster, by our funders – that was fun), my conversations with these women were as fascinating as they were complex. Many praised Church’s lecture, but also acknowledged how huge and knotty her subject was; several emailed me later to clarify their positions. Any decent discussion of these issues is always difficult, I find, because women always know the criticisms and awkward questions that inevitably crop up. Hasn’t sex sold records for ever? Aren’t you prudish if you say women shouldn’t express themselves sexually? Are women being exploited by others or happily exploiting themselves? There aren’t easy answers, either.

I do know one thing, however. A year ago, I wrote a piece for the Quietus about my experience of the Rihanna marketing machine, noting that her career success was being measured not only by her sales, but by Twitter followers and video views. Similarly, this July, Miley Cyrus was delighted to get 306,000 tweets a minute during her notorious “twerking” performance with Robin Thicke at the VMAs – and didn’t seem to mind that many of them were negative. YouTube views count towards chart placings in America, and influence UK radio playlists these days, so mainstream pop’s economy is driven by one thing: hits and clicks.

The irony of this feature adding to that whirlwind is not lost on me. Neither is the fact that by focusing on the perils of lowest-common-denominator sexism, we’re ignoring the commercially successful pop women who avoid them (Emeli Sandé and Taylor Swift have outsold Rihanna this year, for example). There are other glimmers of hope in the conversations that follow too. Only by bringing different women into the mix who have had valid experiences can we broaden this debate, and lessen that juvenile perspective after all.

MAIREAD NASH


Mairead Nash, women in pop
Mairead Nash: ‘It infuriated me that if women hung out with musicians, they were groupies.’ Photograph: Katherine Rose for the Observer

Manager of Florence and the Machine since day one, after discovering Florence Welch singing in a toilet in a nightclub, and founder of Luvluvluv Records. Formerly half of female DJ duo Queens of Noize, who had an MTV show and made a single in which the girls deliberately dressed like boys in the video.

My company is pretty much all women. I didn’t do that on purpose, but we do feel more powerful as a troupe. Maybe I did do it subconsciously, because the industry’s so male-dominated.

I got involved with music young. It infuriated me that men were allowed to hang out with musicians, but if women did, they were groupies. I used to say if you worked at a dentists, you’d hang out with other people from there, wouldn’t you?

The backlash against us turned nasty, though, and I ended up leaving the country. I had to rethink what I wanted to do in the industry, how I wanted to be a part of it.

I’ve worked with Florence from the beginning and, like us, she will not compromise. On big TV shows, if someone says to her: “You’ve got to dress sexy for this”, she’ll go: “Right, then, give me the black bin bag.” I thought her Brits dress [a long peach gown with sheer panels] was amazing, though, and a great compromise. It also irritates me if you do anything as a woman, you’ve got to say why. If Florence collaborates with a writer, she’s got to justify it. If a man does, he doesn’t.

I think the traditional music industry collapsing – in terms of how the digital world has changed it – has been a good thing for women, though. If you can make something work and come up with a good idea, you can own it. It’s almost like punk again… you can make up your own rules. Plus, there are more women coming through now who don’t conform, like Lorde, who’s fantastic. Despite everything, I can only see it getting better.

DAWN SHADFORTH


Dawn Shadforth, women in music
Dawn Shadforth: ‘I’d feel very uncomfortable with girls wearing thongs dancing around a man.’ Photograph: Katherine Rose for the Observer

Award-winning music video director who has directed videos for Kylie, Oasis and Florence and the Machine. In 2000/2001, she directed and edited Kylie’s Spinning Around and Can’t Get You Out of My Head videos, which were widely considered to have reignited her career worldwide.

When I went to art school, there was an expectation that if you were a woman you had to make work about your gender, while men were free to express themselves how they pleased. I felt that was unfair. I have always carried around a little feminist art tutor on my shoulder, though. Now I am older, I listen to that voice more.

Probably the two sexiest videos I have made were for Kylie. When I edited the video for Can’t Get You Out of My Head, there were more risqué shots where the suit was more revealing, so I cut them out. Also, I very clearly remember Kylie and I sitting in my grotty little flat in Brixton, deciding whether to put the close-up shot of her bum into Spinning Around.  Kylie looked at me and said: “What do you think about that shot, Dawn?” I probably said I liked it, and it stayed in without me considering its wider sociopolitical implications. I never said: “Let’s film her arse now” though – when she swung into frame, there was just this beautiful floating bum. Plus, the real sexiness of Kylie’s performance comes because she just is sexy.

More recently, however, I’ve been booked on jobs where they want things to be sexy. I was recently shown a picture of girls wearing thong swimsuits by a manager as a styling suggestion, but I didn’t style it like that because I’d feel very uncomfortable with girls wearing thongs dancing around a man. The dancers all thanked me for dressing them in big knickers too.

I was also making a video recently for a very talented, ballsy girl, who at 20 wrote a global No 1 hit for another band. She wanted to dress in a way that was punky and fierce, but there was a push from the label boss for her to wear a low-cut top, show her breasts, and be less “scary”. That male executive tried to use my influence as a woman to influence her – it’s the first time anyone has said anything like that to me. I told them where to go.

What bothers me now more than anything is that big artists are very straight in terms of their sexuality., perhaps with the exception of Lady Gaga. Men have to be cool and hardass, which is repressive too; they couldn’t dry hump a guitar like Prince today, or get naked like D’Angelo did in 2006. The glamorisation of female victims is also everywhere, in videos such as Rihanna’s Pour It Up, but also ones by Drake and the Weeknd. It’s like we have gone back to film noir times, where voracious sexual women are punished and die, rather than have fun like Madonna did.   

The pressure today is to make your video rise to the top among all this stuff. As a result, the music industry is more risk-averse, going for shock tactics, the lowest common denominator. Very simply, it’s market forces in operation.

ADRIENNE AIKEN


Adrienne Aiken, women in pop
Adrienne Aiken: ‘When I meet new people in the music industry, they assume I’m a singer.’ Photograph: Katherine Rose for the Observer

Only female director of the Music Producers Guild, where less than 4% of listed producers are women. Producer and engineer for more than 30 years, making records and music for TV.

Whenever I meet new people in the music industry, they assume I’m a singer or artist-manager. It gets annoying, but then again, that’s just statistics. There aren’t many female producers, but women have qualities that are very suitable for the job. As child-bearers, we’re supposed to have compassion – not that I’m saying men don’t – but “feminine” qualities of empathy and sensitivity are very useful around artists.

I’ve only experienced direct prejudice once, working on a co-production with a guy who didn’t show for most of the sessions. The guy commissioning the job knew I was doing all the work, but at a meeting later on that everyone attended, he wouldn’t even look at me and only talked to my male partner – saying he was happy for the other guy to carry on doing his work! So I said fine and walked out, shaking with anger. I also find if there’s a problem at any level in the music industry, and there’s a woman behind it, then it’s mentioned. It’s not mentioned so much the other way.

When I’m producing female artists, I don’t tell them not to cross lines. If they are a sexual person trying to get that out in their music, I draw that out. I don’t agree with the overtness of some artists today, but that makes me sound old – every generation has its Elvis, after all!

What is wrong to me is that younger artists, appealing to an even younger audience, are being overt sexually before they know what it all means… but equally, how could you stop kids watching this stuff? You’d have to go all big brother with retina or fingerprint scans! The only way to moderate what is fed to new generations is to moderate what is delivered, and that responsibility needs to come from the labels.

AMY MORGAN


Amy Morgan, women in pop
Amy Morgan: ‘The problems I’ve faced have always been at the mainstream pop end of the industry.’

Talent scout for Island Records at university, then worked in A&R/publishing for Island, Zomba, V2 and Cooperative Music in her early 20s. Now a creative director at Beggars Music since 2009, working with Cat Power, Warpaint and US rapper Kitty.

When I’ve faced problems in the industry because I’m a woman, it’s always been at the mainstream pop end. I dipped my toe in there, and it was awful, a real boys’ club. Being a 21-year-old girl in a company signing 21-year-old girls who never have any clothes on… I sat in rooms thinking, if they’re talking that way about them, what must they be thinking about me?

Young A&R guys are also taken more seriously than women because there’s this weird tradition where knowledge of music has always been considered quite male.

The real problem is that there aren’t enough women high up in the industry, because it’s a very unfriendly place to be an older woman. It’s quite hard to have children, for instance, because of the nature of the job, and the industry is also obsessed by younger women.

But the music industry is also only a mirror to bigger social problems. All it’s doing is producing cultural products that people want to buy, whether that’s the Chris Brown and Rihanna thing, which horrified me, or the Robin Thicke video, which will have been brainstormed and worked out from a formula – they’ll have got the influences from how people are, how people are dancing on dancefloors. And all Miley Cyrus is doing, even if it was her decision, is being reflective of a wider sense where to be successful as a young woman she has to take all her clothes off and lick a hammer.

I feel as frustrated about this as everybody else, and that’s why I’ve chosen to have my career in the independent sector. Without women in more positions of power everywhere, beyond this industry, it’s not going to change.

LISA PAULON


Lisa Paulon, women in pop
Lisa Paulon: ‘The old boys’ clubs are being torn apart.’ Photograph: Katherine Rose for the Observer

PR/marketing director who began her career working for indie labels Wax Trax, Caroline and Sub Pop. Joined Polydor/Universal in 1997, helping launch Queens of the Stone Age, Ian Brown and the Cardigans. Director of own marketing company Traffic since 2001, and director of Camden Crawl festival since 2005.

My original ambition was to be a major record company director, but it took me a long time to realise that that was never going to happen. Why? Because you have to modify your behaviour – essentially, you had to behave as one of the lads to progress.

Working in PR and marketing with the Cardigans taught me a few lessons, though. Nina [Persson, the singer] is a bright woman, and she was going for a sexy biker chick look at the end of the 90s. We did a shoot for Loaded, and she did go topless, but they said it was going to be shot artily, in black and white, really cool. It ended up looking disgusting, so we actually stopped those photos coming out. That’s a rare positive example of an artist not being sold down the road, but you have to have the strength to do that.

There are so many artists that major labels know they can’t sell just through their music, so they try and create a stronger hook. Heavy rock and metal artists are made more angry and shocking, for example, but there isn’t a female equivalent of Alice Cooper or Marilyn Manson, where the imagery is aggressive rather than sexualised.

With Camden Crawl, our booking committee is very mixed, male-to-female, and my experience working on it has been so positive. It’s also funny how people look differently – and positively! – at women when they’re working independently from a big company, as I have done since 2001. You’re not a cog any more. The music industry is becoming more mixed too. Five years ago, there were no female agents, but now about 50% of the people I’m dealing with are women. It gives me faith that the old boys’ clubs are being torn apart.

ALISON HOWE

Former John Peel producer, now series producer of Later… with Jools Holland. Also executive producer of Glastonbury coverage.

I don’t have any advertisers, sponsors or shareholders to deal with at Later, so I’m quite lucky. I haven’t had any issues because of my sex either, but that might be because I don’t work in the music industry – I work in broadcasting.

I don’t book artists because of their gender, but I do try and get a good mix. I would never refuse to book an artist because of the way she presents herself, though. I mean, I’d love Lady Gaga on Later, and whatever she wore would be entirely up to her.

As for the sexualisation of women today, I don’t think it’s a million miles away from what Madonna was doing. The difference now is that kids can watch these clips endlessly, which only 10 years ago just didn’t happen. But equally, they might watch an Adele performance, and that might make a mark. As long as they’ve a choice of things to take in and talk about, then that’s fine. If they start to feel they’ve got to be provocative to get on, that will be a sad day.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/26/women-running-music-industry-feature

Copyright Reclamation For Songwriters Should Extend To Publicity Rights … – Forbes

Posted by Google News | Industry News | domingo 27 octubre 2013 12:44 am
YMCAしている像たち Statues of YMCA

YMCAしている像たち Statues of YMCA (Photo credit: Yuya Sekiguchi)

An obscure provision of the United States copyright law allows a creator of music a right to recover control of that creation after 35 years even when that creator signed away his or her rights. These “termination rights” were pursued with success by the former “policeman”, Victor Willis, for his contribution in writing the hit song “YMCA”. He was the lead singer in the group Village People that gained international fame in the 1970’s disco era.  This law went into effect in 1978.

A creator of music thus has copyright protections, which are a form of intellectual property. Another form of intellectual property is publicity rights – i.e. rights to one’s own name, likeness, images, autographs, and other unique characteristics of persona. This year judges in two high profile federal cases have proclaimed that former NCAA student athletes have publicity rights, and that even existing student athletes can assert those rights as a matter of law against those who use their images without their consent. Both judges held that the First Amendment rights of expression cannot defeat those publicity rights as a matter of law (i.e. no variance in factual findings will alter that conclusion).

While clearly there are differences between copyright protections and publicity rights protections, including but not limited to the fact that copyright protections rest on several grounds, constitutional, judge-made case law, and statutes, while publicity rights are established from common law, the similarities outweigh the differences. In both circumstances the creators clearly have protectable IP rights. They also arguably signed away some or all of those rights. Neither appear to have signed away those rights forever, (although the NCAA claims waivers implicitly did so).

A law can add clarity not save time over litigation. The strength of publicity rights involving former and existing student athletes is likely headed to the US Supreme Court. Congress has often enacted legislation in response to Supreme Court decisions. It would not surprise me to see federal legislation that declares that once the student-athletes’ eligibility to perform in intercollegiate athletics expires; he or she can still recover a share of the revenue generated after a certain period of time. The legislation could, for example, state that 5 years after a football player’s eligibility expires, he can receive royalties from the use of his name on jerseys in a revenue sharing arrangement with the university.

If the university is no longer generating sales from his name, likeness, autographs or images, the player ought to be able to start his own business or partner with others to benefit from his skill.  EA Sports, a defendant that has settled with the student athletes has already stated it may pursue arrangements with players in the future, apart from the NCAA. And perhaps the law will require a revenue sharing arrangement with the university since it too invested resources and provided the opportunity for the player to develop those skills.

Either scenario is more fair-minded than simply never allowing a player to receive a penny from the near full-time activity of playing college football or basketball, even after his playing days are done when the universities generate millions annually from that skill. That is what the NCAA has maintained and that is why the NCAA has been sued by former and current student athletes. Other defendants have settled with the players, leaving the NCAA alone to fight its Titanic battle of inequities and exploitation. While the NCAA has vowed to take this issue to the US Supreme Court, it may find peace in stipulating to at least sharing future revenue when the student athlete no longer plays college sports.  There is more certainty and clarity from legislation as I describe than the costly, lengthy and uncertain reliance on judicial opinions at various levels of the court system. Let the legal wars cease and clarity begin.

 

Source Article from http://www.forbes.com/sites/rogergroves/2013/10/26/copyright-reclamation-for-ymca-songwriters-should-extend-to-publicity-rights-reclamation-for-former-college-athletes/

US music producer Quincy Jones sues Jackson estate – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | sábado 26 octubre 2013 9:32 am







Michael Jackson in the video for Thriller in 1983Quincy Jones worked on Michael Jackson’s hit 1982 album Thriller


US music producer Quincy Jones is suing the estate of the late Michael Jackson for millions of dollars.

He says the singer’s estate and Sony Music Entertainment improperly re-edited songs to deprive him of royalties and production fees.

Mr Jones says they also broke an agreement giving him the right to remix master recordings for albums released after Jackson’s death in 2009.

He produced some of Jackson’s top discs including Off the Wall and Thriller.



















Quincy Jones

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The BBC’s Peter Bowes says Quincy Jones was the best known of Jackson’s producers








The Jackson estate said that it was saddened by the lawsuit.

“To the best of its knowledge, Mr Jones has been appropriately compensated over approximately 35 years for his work with Michael,” a statement said.

Quincy Jones’s lawsuit is seeking at least $10m (£6m) from the singer’s estate and Sony.

Earlier this month the family of Michael Jackson lost a negligence case against concert promoters AEG Live over the death of the 50-year-old pop star.

A jury concluded the doctor looking after the singer ahead of his concert tour was not unfit for his job – and so AEG had not been negligent in hiring him.

Jackson died in 2009 after taking an overdose of a surgical anaesthetic.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-24681875

Meet Freddie, the first British baby born thanks to MUSIC being played in his … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | viernes 25 octubre 2013 11:27 pm
  • Freddie was conceived thanks to an IVF technique which involves playing music to eggs which are being fertilised artificially in a lab
  • Fertilisation rates are 5% higher in incubators where music is played
  • Embryos don’t develop the ability to
    hear for at least 14 weeks, so it is thought that the vibrations
    produced by the music are key
  • They ease the passage of nutrients into the egg and speed the removal of toxic waste

By
Fiona Macrae Science Correspondent

16:29 GMT, 24 October 2013


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23:19 GMT, 24 October 2013

Meet Freddie, the first British baby to be born thanks to music-assisted fertility treatment.

His proud parents had suffered the heartache of two miscarriages and a failed attempt at IVF before hearing about the innovative technique in which music is played to eggs in a dish.

Studies suggest that the tiny vibrations produced by music give fertilisation a helping hand.

Little Freddie is the first British baby to be born thanks to a musical fertility treatment

Little Freddie is the first British baby to be born thanks to a musical fertility treatment

Freddie is now one, and his parents, Isabelle and Stephen, say he seems to have a natural love of music.

The couple, from Liverpool, said: ‘From early on we noticed he was hugely drawn to music. He always loved being sung to and seemed more relaxed when music was being played.

‘We hope that when we tell Freddie about the musical element of his beginnings it will help him feel extra-special.’ 

Freddie’s mother became pregnant with him after travelling to Barcelona for treatment at the Institut Marques fertility clinic where researchers are studying whether playing music in IVF labs boosts the odds of fertilisation.

They injected sperm into almost 1,000 eggs and put them in dishes in incubators.

They then placed speakers in half the incubators and played music round the clock. The playlist included pop songs by Michael Jackson and Madonna, heavier tracks from Nirvana and Metallica and classical works by Bach, Mozart and Vivaldi.

As expected, not all of the eggs were fertilised.

But,
to their surprise, they found that fertilisation rates were around five
per cent higher in the incubators in which music had been played.

Studies suggest that the tiny vibrations produced by music give fertilisation a helping hand

Studies suggest that the tiny vibrations produced by music give fertilisation a helping hand

Pop, heavy metal and classical music appeared to work equally well.

Embryos don’t develop the ability to detect sound for at least 14 weeks, so it is thought that the vibrations produced by the music are key.

They are believed to ease the passage of nutrients into the egg and speed the removal of toxic waste, so increasing the odds of fertilisation taking place and the fledgling embryo surviving.

In natural conception, the fertilised egg is rocked as it rolls down the fallopian tube.  It is also subjected to gentle contractions in the womb.

It is too early to say if the musical
technique boosts the odds of giving birth but couples in 17 countries,
including the UK, have become parents thanks to it. 

Freddie’s loves nothing more than turning the knobs of a large radio that is put beside him when he plays on the floor.

It is thought the vibrations created by music ease the passage of nutrients into the egg and speed the removal of toxic waste, so increasing the odds of fertilisation taking place

It is thought the vibrations created by music ease the passage of nutrients into the egg and speed the removal of toxic waste, so increasing the odds of fertilisation taking place

His parents, who spent four years trying for a family before travelling to Spain, said: ‘We were utterly overjoyed when we discovered that we had been successful. After all our earlier disappointments, it was hard to actually believe that everything would be all right – but it was.

‘We were amazed to learn that our son had been the first born in the UK using the technique.

‘This was a very exciting discovery for us, as we are both huge music lovers.’

Spanish researcher Carolina Castello added that there is no harm in those trying to conceive naturally playing music.

She said: ‘Music is beneficial for everything.’

IVF playlist.jpg

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

Gary,

Durban,

16 hours ago

Thank goodness they did not play Rap to him he would have been born a criminal and stolen the doctors Rolex during delivery.

Fabasalways,

Los Angeles,

16 hours ago

Perfection personified. I can’t stop smiling when I look at the little baby’s picture :) xx

Vickie,

Chorley, United Kingdom,

16 hours ago

Awwwwww what an absolute cutie! Congratulations on finally becoming parents! Best feeling in the world :-)

Zee Chen,

Bay Area Ca, United States,

18 hours ago

Gosh that kid is cute!

redskelf,

Bexhill, United Kingdom,

19 hours ago

N ow THAT is a cute baby, unlike the other baby we have been saturated with.

Olivia,

Philadelphia, United States,

20 hours ago

Can this little munchkin be any cuter?

bikerbabe12,

dundee, United Kingdom,

22 hours ago

Hes so cute and must be metallica that gave him that smile,They sure do rock.

Charles,

London, United Kingdom,

22 hours ago

I couldn’t give two figs HOW he came to be….but oh my lord he’s a handsome little chap ! Swap for a bag of sugar ?

ME,

Wellington, United Kingdom,

22 hours ago

I don’t care about the music thing but that’s one real cutie pie……

Nimmy,

Disgruntled taxpayer – Broken Britain ,

23 hours ago

Absolutely beautiful

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Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2475131/Meet-Freddie-British-baby-born-thanks-MUSIC-played-IVF-lab.html

Photographer Don Hunstein’s behind-the-music shots – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | viernes 25 octubre 2013 11:27 pm

In today’s celebrity-obsessed world, most images of stars tend to be contrived, taken in controlled environments. The paparazzi would love the access Don Hunstein enjoyed for decades.

From 1955-86 he worked as Columbia Records’ in-house photographer, capturing countless moments of musicians in private and with their guard down.

Keeping Time is a trove of mostly unseen and intimate black and white images of jazz, rock, soul, and classical greats who recorded on the Columbia label.

Jon Pareles, the chief popular-music critic for the New York Times, contributed to the book. He spoke to the BBC about Hunstein’s keen eye for a shot and ability to put his famous subjects at ease.

Produced and edited by the BBC’s Bill McKenna

Picture This is a series of video features published every Thursday on the BBC News website which illustrate interviews with authors about their new books.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24642290

Photographer Don Hunstein’s behind-the-music shots – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | viernes 25 octubre 2013 6:26 pm

In today’s celebrity-obsessed world, most images of stars tend to be contrived, taken in controlled environments. The paparazzi would love the access Don Hunstein enjoyed for decades.

From 1955-86 he worked as Columbia Records’ in-house photographer, capturing countless moments of musicians in private and with their guard down.

Keeping Time is a trove of mostly unseen and intimate black and white images of jazz, rock, soul, and classical greats who recorded on the Columbia label.

Jon Pareles, the chief popular-music critic for the New York Times, contributed to the book. He spoke to the BBC about Hunstein’s keen eye for a shot and ability to put his famous subjects at ease.

Produced and edited by the BBC’s Bill McKenna

Picture This is a series of video features published every Thursday on the BBC News website which illustrate interviews with authors about their new books.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24642290

How did ancient Greek music sound? – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 23 octubre 2013 12:52 am







Greek amphitheatreGreek theatre used music with the drama. But what did it sound like?



















Temple of Poseidon

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.












The music of ancient Greece, unheard for thousands of years, is being brought back to life by Armand D’Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University. He describes what his research is discovering.

“Suppose that 2,500 years from now all that survived of the Beatles songs were a few of the lyrics, and all that remained of Mozart and Verdi’s operas were the words and not the music.

Imagine if we could then reconstruct the music, rediscover the instruments that played them, and hear the words once again in their proper setting, how exciting that would be.

This is about to happen with the classic texts of ancient Greece.

It is often forgotten that the writings at the root of Western literature – the epics of Homer, the love-poems of Sappho, the tragedies of Sophocles and Euripides – were all, originally, music.

Dating from around 750 to 400 BC, they were composed to be sung in whole or part to the accompaniment of the lyre, reed-pipes, and percussion instruments.


Finding the pitch

But isn’t the music lost beyond recovery? The answer is no. The rhythms – perhaps the most important aspect of music – are preserved in the words themselves, in the patterns of long and short syllables.


The Argo, re-constructed for TV documentaryTime travellers: Academics are reconstructing the lost sound of ancient Greece

The instruments are known from descriptions, paintings and archaeological remains, which allow us to establish the timbres and range of pitches they produced.

And now, new revelations about ancient Greek music have emerged from a few dozen ancient documents inscribed with a vocal notation devised around 450 BC, consisting of alphabetic letters and signs placed above the vowels of the Greek words.

The Greeks had worked out the mathematical ratios of musical intervals – an octave is 2:1, a fifth 3:2, a fourth 4:3, and so on.

The notation gives an accurate indication of relative pitch: letter A at the top of the scale, for instance, represents a musical note a fifth higher than N halfway down the alphabet. Absolute pitch can be worked out from the vocal ranges required to sing the surviving tunes.

While the documents, found on stone in Greece and papyrus in Egypt, have long been known to classicists – some were published as early as 1581 – in recent decades they have been augmented by new finds. Dating from around 300 BC to 300 AD, these fragments offer us a clearer view than ever before of the music of ancient Greece.

The research project that I have embarked on, funded by the British Academy, has the aim of bringing this music back to life.


Folk music

But it is important to realise that ancient rhythmical and melodic norms were different from our own.


Temple of PoseidonTemple of Poseidon: The music might have sounded unfamiliar to modern ears

We must set aside our Western preconceptions. A better parallel is non-Western folk traditions, such as those of India and the Middle East.

Instrumental practices that derive from ancient Greek traditions still survive in areas of Sardinia and Turkey, and give us an insight into the sounds and techniques that created the experience of music in ancient times.

So what did Greek music sound like?

Some of the surviving melodies are immediately attractive to a modern ear. One complete piece, inscribed on a marble column and dating from around 200 AD, is a haunting short song of four lines composed by Seikilos. The words of the song may be translated:

While you’re alive, shine:

never let your mood decline.

We’ve a brief span of life to spend:

Time necessitates an end.

The notation is unequivocal. It marks a regular rhythmic beat, and indicates a very important principle of ancient composition.

In ancient Greek the voice went up in pitch on certain syllables and fell on others (the accents of ancient Greek indicate pitch, not stress). The contours of the melody follow those pitches here, and fairly consistently in all the documents.


Tuning up

But one shouldn’t assume that the Greeks’ idea of tuning was identical to ours. Ptolemy in the 2nd century AD provides precise mathematical ratios for numerous different scale-tunings, including one that he says sounds “foreign and homespun”.


Joan Plowright and John Gielgud preparing for a radio version of a Sophocles play in 1959Timeless: Joan Plowright and John Gielgud preparing a 1959 radio version of a Sophocles play

Dr David Creese of the University of Newcastle has constructed an eight-string “canon” (a zither-like instrument) with movable bridges.

When he plays two versions of the Seikilos tune using Ptolemy’s tunings, the second immediately strikes us as exotic, more like Middle Eastern than Western music.

The earliest musical document that survives preserves a few bars of sung music from a play, Orestes by the fifth-century BC tragedian Euripides. It may even be music Euripides himself wrote.

Music of this period used subtle intervals such as quarter-tones. We also find that the melody doesn’t conform to the word pitches at all.

Euripides was a notoriously avant-garde composer, and this indicates one of the ways in which his music was heard to be wildly modern: it violated the long-held norms of Greek folk singing by neglecting word-pitch.


Start Quote


Gold mask of Agamemnon

We’ve a brief span of life to spend”


End Quote
The epitaph of Seikilos

However, we can recognise that Euripides adopted another principle. The words “I lament” and “I beseech” are set to a falling, mournful-sounding cadence; and when the singer says “my heart leaps wildly”, the melody leaps as well. This was ancient Greek soundtrack music.

And it was received with great excitement in the Greek world. The historian Plutarch tells a moving story about the thousands of Athenian soldiers held prisoner in roasting Syracusan quarries after a disastrous campaign in 413 BC. Those few who were able to sing Euripides’ latest songs were able to earn some food and drink.

What about the greatest of ancient poet-singers, Homer himself?

Homer tells us that bards of his period sang to a four-stringed lyre, called a “phorminx”. Those strings will probably have been tuned to the four notes that survived at the core of the later Greek scale systems.

Professor Martin West of Oxford has reconstructed the singing of Homer on that basis. The result is a fairly monotonous tune, which probably explains why the tradition of Homeric recitation without melody emerged from what was originally a sung composition.

“What song the Sirens sang,” is the first of the questions listed by the 17th Century English writer, Sir Thomas Browne, as “puzzling, though not beyond all conjecture”.

“The reconstruction of ancient Greek music is bringing us a step closer to answering the question.”

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-24611454

Twitter fail: Social network closes #Music app six months after launch – The Independent

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 22 octubre 2013 7:47 pm

Launched amid much hype, the Twitter #Music app, has been a rare flop for Twitter, falling to number 1,672 on the popularity list published by app analytics company, Onavo.

Twitter is rethinking its music strategy and is believed to be working on a new proposition which will link music directly to a user’s news feed.

The Twitter #Music app promised to change the way people find and share new songs online.

But many Twitter users remained unaware of its existence.

Twitter has since hired two executives with significant experience in music technology: Nathan Hubbard, the former president of Ticketmaster, who was named Twitter’s head of commerce in August.

Bob Moczydlowsky, from the music marketing service Topspin Media, became its head of music last month. Twitter is partnering with Apple on the computer giant’s recently launched iTunes Radio streaming service.

Source Article from http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/news/twitter-fail-social-network-closes-music-app-six-months-after-launch-8897053.html

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