James Blake wins Mercury music prize for album Overgrown – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Thursday 31 October 2013 5:26 am

He might not be the hard-drinking rockstar of old but classically-trained pianist James Blake proved that cerebral compositions on a keyboard are no barrier to success after he was crowned winner of the coveted Barclaycard Mercury prize.

Blake, a 25-year-old who missed out on the prize in 2011, toasted the biggest accolade of his career as he overcame the odds to beat David Bowie and Arctic Monkeys to the 21st album of the year award.

“The dreams you have when you’re punching through water and if you’re lucky [you] dream hitting them right on the nose. When what you thought wasn’t going to happen does, that’s very surreal,” he said, clutching his award backstage.

Blake’s win caps a meteoric two-year rise for the former Goldsmiths student, whose transcendent voice and ambient tracks have proved a critically acclaimed hit against a wall of traditional guitar music and electronica. He said he would celebrate by getting drunk but pledged of his £20,000 cheque: “I will not piss it up the wall.”

Despite Lauren Laverne mistakenly introducing him on stage as James Blunt during a televised ceremony at the Roundhouse in Camden, north London, Blake beat stars including David Bowie to win the £20,000 prize for Overgrown, his second album.

The musician, whose father was a member of the band Colosseum, produced his second album himself and it features contributions from Brian Eno and RZA from Wu-Tang Clan.

The judges described it as “Late night music for the digital age. An inventive, poignant and poetic record of great beauty.”

Asked how it felt to beat Bowie, Blake said: “I don’t think I beat him. It’s amazing to be in the running for this prize. A lot of people do their best work when they’re young and it’s always disappointing to me when they don’t continue in that vein and innovate. David Bowie is an example to people like me to keep on innovating.”

Blake also saw off competition from 19-year-old chart-topper Jake Bugg, raucous drum’n'bass electronic outfit Disclosure and previous winners Arctic Monkeys. Blake was a 20-1 outsider before the event, with the Birmingham-born singer-songwriter Laura Mvula the runaway favourite.

Speaking after the awards, NME’s Kevin Perry described Overgrown as “one of the least commercial records on this year’s relatively populist list”.

“James Blake’s announcement was met with genuine surprise here at the awards,” he said. “It’s an innovative and nuanced record, and although it hasn’t matched the likes of [Arctic Monkey's album] AM or [Foals'] Holy Fire for popularity in the NME office, it’s a worthy winner.”

JJ Dunning, editor of indie magazine the Fly, said the selection confirms suggestions the Mercury prize is not “into picking edgy music”. “He’s been unfairly derided as a bit mopey by some, but there is an extraordinary quality to James Blake’s music that makes it worthy of an accolade. Perhaps just not this accolade.”

Fans hoping Bowie would cap this year’s unexpected comeback with a surprise appearance at the Roundhouse were disappointed. Instead of his first on-stage performance in seven years, viewers were shown the video for his track Love Is Lost.

Music critic Simon Price said awarding the prize to Bowie would have been a “sentimental” vote ahead of next year’s 50th anniversary of Liza Jane, his first single.

“His album was sprung upon us as a surprise and it looked for a moment like it was Bowie’s year, but that moment has passed,” he said.

“Bowie has been keeping a very low profile so he’s going to want to break his silence on a bigger stage than a room full of luvvies in the middle of London.”

Mvula was one of five artists to make the annual list with their debut album, alongside Bugg and post-punk outfit Savages, who played their first gig last year. The other first-timers are drum’n'bass quartet Rudimental and electronic duo Disclosure.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/30/james-blake-mercury-music-prize

What is the scariest film music? – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 30 October 2013 7:22 pm

Perhaps the most disconcerting horror soundtrack is the hitherto innocuous
popular song you can never listen to again without flashing back to its use
in some grim context. I wonder how many memories of Singin’ in the Rain have
been scarred by the rape scene in A Clockwork Orange. The nursery rhyme Row,
Row, Row Your Boat provides a baby monitor scare in Insidious: Chapter 2,
though for viewers of a certain age it will already have been poisoned for
all time by the Scorpio
Killer
forcing a hi-jacked busful of children to sing it in Dirty
Harry.

Standards from the 1930s are a useful source of period-style spookiness. The
Shining has forever contaminated a clutch of big band tunes, especially Al
Bowlly’s Midnight
The Stars and You
. Art Jarrett’s Did
You Ever See a Dream Walking?
, introduced in the 1933 film Sitting
Pretty, plays a vital role in the plot of Frank LaLoggia’s underappreciated
children’s ghost story Lady
in White
(1988). Meanwhile, Harry Warren’s Jeepers Creepers (lyrics
by Johnny Mercer) is a particular favourite of my tapdancing teacher, and
I’ve never had the heart to tell him I can’t hop-shuffle-ballchange to it
without being reminded of what happens a) between Donald Sutherland and
obnoxious child star Jackie Earle Haley at the nightmarish climax of The
Day of the Locust
, or b) to Justin Long at the end of the all too
appropriately named Jeepers
Creepers
. Neither of which is anything to dance about.

Which film has the scariest music?

As for pop music, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards must have made a tidy sum in
royalties from the number of times Sympathy for the Devil has been co-opted
as a handy motif for vampires or demons, perhaps most notably at the end of
Interview with the Vampire. Gregory Hoblit’s Fallen also made good use of
Jerry Ragovoy’s Time
Is On My Side
, a song famously covered by the Rolling Stones, as a
signifier of demonic possession; Azazel just can’t seem to stop singing it,
no matter whose body he has taken over.

Paint It Black is another Stones soundtrack favourite, best used to creepy
effect as a song with special significance for the phantom in David Koepp’s Stir
of Echoes
, an excellent ghost story which suffered at the box-office
from being released in 1999, just after The Sixth Sense. Clearly the Stones,
who tried so hard to be demonic in the 1960s, are the genre’s popsters of
choice, though in terms of real life horror (and despite what happened at Altamont)
they will forever be trumped by the Beatles, whose Helter Skelter was taken
to heart by Charles Manson.

But the prize for Best Use of an Otherwise Innocuous Song in a Horror Movie
must surely go to Brian Yuzna’s 1989 Society, which harnesses the Eton
Boating Song to gloriously subversive effect in an example of “body
horror” so revolting I can’t bring myself to link to it here, though
it’s easy enough to track down if you’re curious, and have a strong stomach.
You have been warned.

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/film/10412570/The-horror-movies-with-the-spookiest-music.html

Mercury Music Prize Winner Announced Tonight – Sky News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 30 October 2013 2:22 pm

Laura Mvula is favourite to win tonight’s Mercury Prize ahead of acts including music veteran David Bowie and previous winners Arctic Monkeys.

Bookmakers have made Birmingham-born soul singer Mvula 4/6 to win followed by electronic duo Disclosure, rockers Foals and Bowie, who surprised fans by returning to music with his The Next Day album.

Alex Turner of the Arctic Monkeys
The Arctic Monkeys have previously won the prize

The 12-strong list for the event includes seven acts who have previously featured on the shortlist since the prize was launched in 1992.

Arctic Monkeys – who took the prize in 2006 – and singer-songwriter Laura Marling each make it on to the list for a third time, while Foals, James Blake and Villagers are among those who make their second appearance in the nominations list.

David Bowie's Where Are We Now? (ISO Records/Columbia Records)
David Bowie pictured in the video for Where Are We Now?

Bowie, who rarely plays live now, is the only one of the 12 shortlisted acts who will not perform at the event at the Roundhouse in north London.

The list, which includes five debuts by the likes of 19-year-old Jake Bugg and Disclosure, was drawn from 220 albums submitted to the judging panel.

Members of British band Rudimental pose for pictures during a photo call before the Isle of MTV Malta concert in Floriana, outside Valletta
Rudimental have had two successful singles

The other first-timers are Mvula, Savages and Rudimental. Inclusion on the shortlist usually ensures an instant boost in sales for nominated artists, who hope to emulate last year’s winners Alt-J who triumphed with debut album An Awesome Wave.

Other winners over the years have included Elbow, Klaxons and two-time winner PJ Harvey.

The £20,000 prize is open to British and Irish acts and aims to reward the best album of the year.

:: Arctic Monkeys – AM

The Sheffield quartet’s album is described by Mercury judges as “a bold new chapter in the Arctic Monkeys’ story – sonically gripping, lyrically involving and brilliantly performed”.

:: David Bowie – The Next Day

The pop veteran released his 24th studio album earlier this year, which judges say “celebrates his legendary songwriting ability with panache and a remarkable sense of urgency”.

:: Disclosure – Settle

Made up of musician brothers Howard and Guy Lawrence from Reigate in Surrey, the electronic duo have played numerous European festivals.

:: Foals – Holy Fire

Holy Fire is the third album by the Oxford quintet and marks their second inclusion on the Mercury shortlist following Total Life Forever in 2010.

:: Jake Bugg – Jake Bugg

The 19-year-old singer-songwriter from Nottingham released his debut in October 2012, which judges say is “fluent, restless, acutely observed songs of teenage life in contemporary Britain”.

:: James Blake – Overgrown

The Goldsmiths College music graduate was previously nominated for the Mercury for his self-titled debut album which he recorded at his home in New Cross, southeast London. His latest work is described as “late night music for the digital age”.

:: Jon Hopkins – Immunity

He has also been a Mercury contender in 2011 for his collaboration with prolific recording artist King Creosote for the album Diamond Mine. Hopkins is also known for his production work with Brian Eno and Coldplay.

:: Laura Marling – Once I Was An Eagle

The indie-folk singer recorded the album in Bath and Wiltshire with respected producer Ethan Johns, with whom she has previously worked, and it reached number three in the charts.

:: Laura Mvula – Sing To The Moon

Mvula, a graduate from the Birmingham Conservatoire, released her debut album in March 2013 and was among the performers at the BBC’s Urban Prom at the Royal Albert Hall in August.

:: Rudimental – Home

Rudimental have worked with guest vocalists such as John Newman and have already notched up two chart-topping singles with Feel The Love and Waiting All Night.

:: Savages – Silence Yourself

The all-female pop-punk act – with a name inspired by literary classic Lord Of The Flies – formed two years ago and made their debut supporting British Sea Power.

:: Villagers – Awayland

The act’s debut Becoming A Jackal was shortlisted in 2010 and the title track of that album was nominated for an Ivor Novello Award.

Source Article from http://news.sky.com/story/1161465/mercury-music-prize-winner-announced-tonight

Britney Spears’ music used by British navy to scare off Somali pirates – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Wednesday 30 October 2013 2:22 pm

In an excellent case of “here’s a sentence you won’t read every day”, Britney Spears has emerged as an unlikely figurehead in the fight against Somali pirates.

According to reports, Britney’s hits, including Oops! I Did It Again and Baby One More Time, are being employed by British naval officers in an attempt to scare off pirates along the east coast of Africa. Perhaps nothing else – not guns, not harpoons – is quite as intimidating as the sound of Ms Spears singing “Ooh baby baby!”

Merchant naval officer Rachel Owens explained the tactics to Metro: “Her songs were chosen by the security team because they thought the pirates would hate them most. These guys can’t stand western culture or music, making Britney’s hits perfect. As soon as the pirates get a blast of Britney, they move on as quickly as they can.”

Britney is currently preparing to release her eighth album, Britney Jean, in December. It follows the single Work Bitch, although producer Will.i.am claimed the sound of this track is not indicative of the rest of the record. No doubt the record’s eclectic sound has been designed to keep any potential pirates on their toes.

Britney Jean will be Spears’ first album since 2011′s Femme Fatale. When it’s released, perhaps the British military can stockpile copies down a bunker in Norfolk in preparation for the third world war.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/29/britney-spears-navy-scare-somali-pirates

The alternative Mercury prize 2013 shortlist – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Tuesday 29 October 2013 6:13 pm


These New Puritans Field of Reeds

It seems faintly astonishing that These New Puritans’ Field of Reeds hasn’t been nominated: it’s so obviously the kind of music the prize should be rewarding. It’s brave, original and beautiful. It exists in a space of its own, somewhere between experimental rock and modern classical music. It’s made by a band whose creativity seems impressively restless: it bears almost no resemblance to its predecessor, Hidden, which in turn sounded nothing like their debut album Beat Pyramid. The Mercury has a raison d’etre when it points up a fantastic album that people might otherwise have missed, and Field of Reeds fits that bill perfectly: it stalled at number 90 on the charts. It could have used the spotlight a Mercury nomination confers. Alexis Petridis


Pet Shop Boys Electric

There’s not enough pop in the Mercury, dammit, but here’s some that deserves to be. Two millinery-loving pop warhorses, after 32 years in the paddock, have made a record that feels fuelled by the spirit of 2013 – as the album of the year is meant to be. It’s absurdly British, which fits the criteria, too. Here’s Purcell meeting David Lodge at a rave (Love Is a Bourgeois Construct), dirty techno inspired by Michael Gambon’s description of theatre (Shouting in the Evening), a collaboration with Example which doesn’t sound fusty, but fresh (Thursday) plus tons of ambition, life, light and noise. They wuz robbed. Jude Rogers


The 1975 The 1975

This one sneaked out just before nominations closed, so perhaps the judging panel could be forgiven for not realising this debut would be a No 1. But they might have noticed that rare thing: an album that combined real emotional heft with a terrific pop sensibility. Maybe they were put off by the array of styles – the 1975′s Matt Healy says they tried to make an album that reflected the way people listen to music these days, flitting from anthemic guitar rock, to bouncy pop funk, to ambient interludes, via most points in-between – or maybe they just thought an album whose core constituency was teenagers was a little beneath them. Whatever the reason, they were wrong. The 1975 is an album with so many delights that, despite the instant sugar rush, it also works as a slow burn, yielding more pleasures than one could ever have expected. Michael Hann


Booth/Josefowicz/Wood/Watkins/Wigglesworth/BCMG/BBCSO/Knussen Knussen: Choral; Autumnal; Whitman Settings; Violin Concerto; Requiem: Song for Sue etc

Not only should this have been on the shortlist, it should have walked it, even and especially in the face of Bowie et al: it’s a release of eight pieces, all recorded for the first time, of Oliver Knussen’s music on the label NMC Recordings. Haven’t hear of Knussen, or his music? Make up for it right now, as this disc is the perfect place to start. And there’s as much magic in one bar of, say, Knussen’s Violin Concerto, or any of the songs from his nakedly expressive Requiem: Songs for Sue, or in the glittering piano writing of Ophelia’s Last Dance, as there is in the rest of the Mercury shortlist put together. In my (not-particularly-humble) opinion, at least! Tom Service


Ikonika Aerotropolis

Ikonika was part of that second wave of dubstep producers who took Kode 9′s anything-goes (as long as it involved sub bass) approach and ran with it. On Aerotropolis she took that idea to another level. Inspired by the idea of a city built around an airport (she grew up in Hounslow, near Heathrow), it leaves behind the constraints of any one genre, meandering through R&B-inflected garage (Beach Mode), instrumental grime (Backhand Winners) and Omar S-style stripped-back melodic techno (Eternal Mode). It’s an album that represents the UK underground’s current obsession with amalgamating styles, and its healthy melting-pot ideology. Lanre Bakare


Mutation Error 500

Conceived by Brit rock hero Ginger Wildheart and featuring a stellar cast of maverick hooligans – including Napalm Death’s Shane Embury, Mark E Smith and even Japanese noise terrorist Merzbow – Error 500 is brave, inventive and startling in a way that the actual nominees plainly aren’t. A bewildering collage of brutal noise, warped psychedelia and demented electronica, songs like Bracken and White Leg are not for the faint-hearted, but they offer an adrenaline rush and third-eye vision that deserves to be celebrated, cherished and played at life-threatening volume. Dom Lawson


Hacker Farm UHF

Few self-respecting music journalists would make the claim, but there’s good reason to argue that when the Mercury jurors gave the 2010 prize to the xx, Mumford & Sons were robbed; their Sigh No More better captured the zeitgeist with its absurd faux-rural aesthetic, its contemporary take on the retreat-to-a-rural-idyll schtick that groups like the Band once espoused – the musical equivalent of a Shoreditch homeware store that will sell you a tin of twine. Of course, the great British countryside was never as twee as that – a point made forcibly by the second album from mysterious electronic collective Hacker Farm. It’s an unsettling, very necessary work, the exact opposite of so much tasteful ambient music. Indeed, to say that this is a record that often sounds like a field recording of a slurry pump slowly leaking power is to garland it with the highest praise imaginable. Caspar Llewellyn Smith


My Bloody Valentine m b v

Kevin Shields is not a man known for holding back, and so it was with his reaction to My Bloody Valentine’s m b v not being included on the list of nominations. “To be as independent as we are is … virtually illegal,” he railed, before muttering about “sinister forces at work.” Whether or not the dark arts really were behind the inclusion of Jake Bugg over m b v – and it certainly makes you wonder, right? – you can’t help but sympathise with Shields’ anguish. The band’s first release since 1991′s classic Loveless trod a familiar path, but it was still one that only they have the map to follow. Indeed, m b v sounded like exactly the kind of record you thought the Mercury was invented for championing: challenging, baffling and at times – as on wonder 2, essentially a drum’n'bass rave taking place in the middle of a tornado – utterly jaw-dropping. Tim Jonze


Boards of Canada Tomorrow’s Harvest

The Scottish duo Boards of Canada have a bunker mentality. Whatever else may be happening in music, they doggedly pursue their own esoteric fascinations and Tomorrow’s Harvest is their most haunting album yet. Even without the clues sown throughout the album (Palace Posy is an anagram of apocalypse), it audibly suggests a hollowed-out landscape in the aftermath of some terrible event. Partly inspired by the soundtracks to arcane horror movies, it’s a meticulously constructed, cinematic work that moves from eerie paranoia to tentative optimism, painting vivid mental pictures as it goes. Estranged and obsessive, it may initially seem low-key but it gets into your bones. Dorian Lynskey


King Krule 6 Feet Beneath The Moon

King Krule’s debut is not perfect. It’s repetitive and a bit too long, in fact. However, Archy Marshall has the makings of an artist capable of greatness. The album – 14 stoned insights into the mind of a prodigal 19-year-old submerged in bleak inner-city paranoia – may feel disobediently unbrilliant at times. But his talents deserve shortlist recognition, at least. From the opening chords of the raw, romantic Out Getting Ribs, to his savage and sneering live renditions of Has This Hit?, King Krule has shown the spark of electric ingenuity. He is a maverick, a teenager – and dabbles in enough off-beat skits to fill that token jazz category. Harriet Gibsone


Maya Jane Coles Comfort

Maya Jane Coles made the often-tricky transition from acclaimed house DJ to album artist feel effortless. Comfort was a fully formed aesthetic statement that owed as much to the trip-hop Coles began her career making as to the London house scene that she’s helped bring back in vogue. It’s both slinky and murky: her arrangements are thick with bass and rich with melody, which means her gothy introspection feels luxuriant and immersive rather than mopey. In many ways, Comfort feels like a night-time counterpart to last year’s dreamy Playin’ Me by Cooly G, another debut album from a cutting-edge London producer overlooked by the Mercury panel: this year’s shortlist may feature more dance albums than ever, but it’s evident that those in charge simply don’t know where to look beyond those whose commercial success makes them unignorable (Rudimental, Disclosure), or those that offer polite, 6music-friendly takes on dancefloor innovations of eight years ago (Jon Hopkins). Alex Macpherson


Steve Mason Monkey Minds in the Devil’s Time

The former Beta Band frontman ticks all the boxes of a potential Mercury winner. He has enormous respect that hasn’t yet transferred to the mainstream, and his second solo album pulses with the zeitgeist of our times. It’s a hymnal drift through dub, funk and ethereal electronica, topped off by insightful musings on everything from the origins of his depression to the state of the world. Of course – as Fight Them Back underlines – the Scot is politically outspoken. It would be dismaying if this was the stumbling block to wider recognition. Dave Simpson

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/29/alternative-mercury-prize-shortlist-2013

Amazon’s Cloud Player music app now available for OS X – The Verge

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Tuesday 29 October 2013 6:13 pm

After first launching a desktop music player (complete with built-in MP3 store) on PC, Amazon is today bringing Cloud Player to OS X. Just as before, the company is touting the app as a one-stop shop for all of your music needs; Cloud Player combines any existing music stored on your Mac with your cloud library of Amazon purchases. Songs can be streamed from the web or downloaded for offline playback, and Amazon MP3 offers over 25 million songs for immediate purchase inside the app. In our brief initial hands-on with Cloud Player, everything worked just as expected, and did so rather quickly. Amazon says Cloud Player is “built for speed,” and that comes across when using it. We doubt Apple is all that concerned about Amazon’s increased presence on OS X, but Cloud Player is a great new addition for users already invested in the company’s ecosystem. And even if you’re not, it’s an easy way in; 69 cent songs and $5.00 albums are given prominent placement in the store, making those impulse purchases all too easy.

Source Article from http://www.theverge.com/2013/10/29/5042294/amazon-cloud-player-now-available-for-mac

Lou Reed’s New York City: Chelsea girls and parking lots – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Tuesday 29 October 2013 6:13 pm

When Brooklyn-born musician Lou Reed died on Long Island on Sunday, he left behind a city whose grit and grime inspired him to create music that influenced decades of successful musicians.

These days, the Lower East Side crack dealers are more subtle and most of the prostitutes have been cleared from Times Square – but the scent of cigarette smoke hasn’t yet cleared and it is still impossible to go an entire day without hearing a car horn.

In the 1995 film Blue In The Face, Reed talks about why he was never far from the city:

I think one of the reasons I live in New York is cause I know my way around New York. I don’t know my way around Paris. I don’t know my way around Denver. I don’t know my way around Maui. I don’t know my way around Toronto … it’s almost by default. I don’t know very many people in New York who don’t also say ‘I’m leaving.’ I’ve been thinking of leaving for 35 years now, I’m almost ready.

John Cale’s apartment: 56 Ludlow Street

When Lou Reed met John Cale, a fellow founding member of The Velvet Underground, Cale was living in this apartment on Ludlow Street in New York’s Lower East Side. Victor Bockris, who wrote a biography of Reed, described the space as a “bohemian slum dwelling”.

This dwelling is where Reed, Cale and Sterling Morrison rehearsed and recorded six songs in 1965, creating the foundation of their first album The Velvet Underground and Nico.

Cale returned to the spot in January and told the Wall Street Journal:

When we rehearsed, we weren’t too loud. We only had acoustic instruments and the most basic amps. We stole electricity from other apartments, so wires snaked all over the place. Besides, the people downstairs were always blasting music on the radio, so no one in the building heard us or complained.

The Factory: 231 East 47th Street

This was the site of Andy Warhol’s Factory from 1963 to 1968. Reed’s Walk on the Wild Side is about the time he spent hobnobbing with New York hipsters in The Factory:

Holly came from Miami, Florida
Hitch-hiked her way across the USA
Plucked her eyebrows on the way
Shaved her legs and then he was a she

She says, “Hey, babe
Take a walk on the wild side”
She said, “Hey, honey
Take a walk on the wild side”

That space is now a parking lot in the well-groomed Midtown district of Manhattan which is almost always vacant by 10pm, any night of the week.

A large group of people were gathered outside the area on Monday, enveloped in the meaty scent of what seems to be the neighborhood’s most popular food cart.

Andy Warhol's Factory
Andy Warhol’s first Factory location was razed in the late 1960s. Now, it is a parking lot. Photograph: Amanda Holpuch for the Guardian

Dom: 19-25 St Marks Place

The East Village bar and club Dom played host to the early stages of Andy Warhol’s mixed media show with The Velvet Underground and Nico – Exploding Plastic Inevitable. This cavalcade of rock music, avant-garde film and dancing started at this nightclub in April 1966 and eventually toured throughout the US.

A pedestrian walks by the former site of the rock club The Dom, where the Velvet Underground was the house band on October 28, 2013 in New York City.
A pedestrian walks by the former site of the rock club The Dom, where the Velvet Underground was the house band. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

125 and Lexington

This is where Reed waited to buy heroin from a man and I watched a disgruntled person overturn a garbage can.

I’m waiting for my man
Got 26 dollars in my hand
Up to Lexington 125
Feelin’ sick and dirty
Huh, I’m waiting for my man

The neighborhood gentrified considerably since I’m Waiting for the Man appeared on The Velvet Underground’s 1967 debut – but this corner maintains the trademark New York grit evinced in Reed’s music. On any given day, a person may have to step over a flattened rat carcass to cross 125th Street and get a $1 slice of pizza or hotdog across the street.

Chelsea Hotel: 222 W 23rd Street

This historic hotel inspired Reed and Sterling Morrison’s song Chelsea Girls, sung by Nico on her 1967 debut album.

Pepe she’s having fun
she thinks she’s some men’s son
Her perfect loves don’t last
her future died
in someone’s past

Here they come now
see them run now
Here they come now
Chelsea Girls

It’s serving as the city’s defacto memorial for Reed – with flowers and lit candles at the doorway, below the plaques honoring the hotel’s famous guests, including Leonard Cohen and Dylan Thomas.

Janis Joplin, Patti Smith and Iggy Pop have also spent time in the 250-unit hotel, which is now a registered New York City landmark. Some of their tales were published by Vanity Fair this month

Chelsea Hotel was purchased by a real estate developer in May 2011 and stopped taking reservations in August of that year. It’s been mired in lawsuits, management restructuring and renovations ever since.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/28/lou-reed-new-york-city-today

The haunting music that takes you back 1800 years: Expert records ’100 … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Tuesday 29 October 2013 6:13 pm
  • Musical rhythms were preserved in the patterns of words of ancient texts
  • Instruments used are known from paintings and archaeological remains
  • Ancient documents found on stone reveal how the pitch should have risen
  • Dr D’Angour claims the ‘magical’ recordings are 100% accurate

By
Ellie Zolfagharifard

16:19 GMT, 28 October 2013


|

16:22 GMT, 28 October 2013

The beautiful texts of ancient Greece have captivated our imaginations for thousands of years.  

From the tragedies of Sophocles to the epics of Homer, modern literature throughout the world continues to be inspired by these classics.

But the haunting music these poems were originally sung to have long since been lost, with researchers instead focusing on the meaning of the words.

Scroll down to listen to the music…

The music of ancient Greece, which hasn't been heard for more than 2,000 years, is being reconstructed by Armand D'Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University

The music of ancient Greece, which hasn’t been heard for more than 2,000 years, is being reconstructed by Armand D’Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University

Now an expert from Oxford University has reconstructed the music, and rediscovered some of the instruments that played them – and he claims the recordings are 100 per cent accurate.

‘There is no question that we can reconstruct what this fascinating music sounded like,’ Dr Armand D’Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University, told MailOnline.

‘We have been left with clear instructions, thousands of years old, about how to create instruments used to play the music with mathematical precision.’

A fresco painting from Pompeii, Italy.

One of the great Greek lyrists and few known female poets of the ancient world, Sappho was born some time between 630 and 612 BC. Her love poetry would have been composed to music, such as the tune heard above

The result, according to Dr D’Angour, is ‘something quite magical’ which may sound odd to our ears, but was hugely popular with audiences at the time.

To reconstruct the music, Dr D’Angour and his team put together existing clues about the tunes, rhythms and the instruments of the time.

The rhythms, for instance, are preserved in the patterns of long and short syllables in the words of the texts themselves.

The instruments used – such as lyre and reed-pipes -  are known from, paintings and archaeological remains.

An illustration from The Odyssey

The instruments used – such as lyre and reed-pipes – are known from, paintings and archaeological remains, such as this illustration from The Odyssey by Homer

A replica of a Biblical harp in a museum in Haifa
Seiklos

The lyre (left) is a string instrument known for its use in Greek classical antiquity and later. The right image shows the Seikilos epitaph, the oldest surviving example of a complete musical composition. The song is in the ancient Greek musical notation, was found engraved on a tombstone, near Aidin, Turkey

A SONG FROM 200 AD

Some of the surviving melodies are immediately attractive to a modern ear, said Dr D’Angrour.

One complete piece, inscribed on a marble column and dating from around 200 AD, is a haunting short song of four lines composed by Seikilos.

The words of the song may be translated as:

While you’re alive, shine:

Never let your mood decline.

We’ve a brief span of life to spend:

Time necessitates an end.

Meanwhile, ancient documents found on stone in Greece and papyrus in Egypt, reveal exactly how the pitch should have risen throughout the composition.

Inscribed with a vocal notation devised around 450 BC, the documents show alphabetic letters and signs placed above the vowels of the Greek words that reveal the mathematical ratios of musical intervals.

Dr D’Angour said that similar music to that played in ancient Greece can today found in the folk music traditions of Sardinia and Turkey, providing an insight into the sounds and techniques used.

For instance, in ancient Greece, a musical note would go up in pitch on certain syllables and fall on others, rather than being stressed.

Detail from the Ambrosian Iliad

‘One of the things Greeks were fascinating by at all times was the notion of imitation,’ said Dr D’Angour. Pictured is artwork from the Ambrosian Iliad, a 5th century illuminated manuscript of the Iliad of Homer, depicting a battle scene. This poem may would have been set to music to enhance the emotions it evoked

The music of this period also used delicate intervals such as quarter-tones, and the melody was often different to the vocal pitches used in the poems.

‘We’re talking about a period of around 1000 years so there was lots of different styles and sounds that many of which would have been lost,’ said Dr D’Angour.

‘In so far as we’re aware of different sounds the earliest music, say from 5th C BC, are more alien to us that the later music from 200 AD, which sounds a bit like early church melodies.’

Dr D’Angour has only just begun his collaborative two-year project, at the end of which he hopes to uncover exactly what music meant to ancient Greeks.

‘One of the things Greeks were fascinating by at all times was the notion of imitation,’ said Dr D’Angour.

‘The idea that they could find auditory phenomena that could imitate emotion meant that the music had to feel like it had some kind of enhanced meaning.

‘Some of it absolutely haunting but one of the things I feel most of all is that it’s amazing to hear music that hasn’t been heard for 2,000 years.’

The comments below have not been moderated.

Awemaker,

Boston,

1 hour ago

The tunings can’t be that precise, because when the two play together, they aren’t in tune with each other. So 100% accurate? No. I think it’s not possible to have the tuning exactly because these folks knew nothing of a well tempered scale, which is itself a compromise from natural tuning.

Awemaker,

Boston,

1 hour ago

The tunings can’t be that precise, because when the two play together, they aren’t in tune with each other. So 100% accurate? No. I think it’s not possible to have the tuning exactly because these folks knew nothing of a well tempered scale, which is itself a compromise from natural tuning.

JeanneCoDown,

Belfast,

2 hours ago

Sounds like one of the Star Trek theme tunes.

Rob,

London, United Kingdom,

4 hours ago

I would like to hear Miley Cyrus perform this tongue out and the full treatment.

Tae,

Ashland, United States,

5 hours ago

Beautiful! Maybe King David of the Bible sounded something like this?

Wizzle12 Birmingham,

Birmingham, United Kingdom,

6 hours ago

Nar, I still prefer Kurt Cobain.

Bob Roberts,

Tombstone, United States,

6 hours ago

Damnit Spock I’m a doctor not a musician! How the hell should i know!

Plebeian,

Plebsville, United Kingdom,

8 hours ago

Needs a tube screamer.

Oli,

Englishland,

9 hours ago

How do we know Mozart is accurate? How do we know Bach or Beethoven is accurate? Because we have the music sheets. Essentially, this is what Dr D’Angour has discovered so can play it the same way they did.

Spantrekker,

Mazarron Spain, Spain,

9 hours ago

In the Odyssey illustration the three characters on the right don’t exactly exude great enthusiasm for what they are hearing and one is even crying. In fact I think if I had to sit and was forced to listen to that I think I might be crying too!

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

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Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2478381/The-haunting-music-takes-1-800-years-Expert-records-100-accurate-version-song-heard-ancient-Greece.html

Spies (New band of the day No 1627) – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Tuesday 29 October 2013 6:13 pm

Hometown: Dublin.

The lineup: Michael Broderick, Neil Dexter, Conor Cusack, Hugh O’Dwyer, Jeffrey Courtney.

The background: Hard to believe about Lou Reed, isn’t it? Talk about pervasive influence. He instigated so many schools of thought, invented so many ways for rock musicians to express themselves, you can alight pretty much anywhere and find elements of his DNA. Take today’s new band, whom we decided to feature before Reed died. There are no signs of the European avant garde here, nor are these five Irish boys poets of New York street hassle, but still you hear their music and you think: probably, without old Lou, they would have sounded quite different, and they might not even have existed.

Reed painted rock black, and that’s the colour of the spectrum Spies use. They do dark, and they also do dynamics: the interplay between drummer, bassist and guitarist is theatrical in its intensity, and the singer works hard to maintain the illusion that they are in the eye of the storm. Their timing is excellent. Their music offers a sense that the world is a place where big, frightening things happen, both on a large scale and a personal, intimate level, and that they are here to provide the soundtrack. In that way, they are reminiscent of early U2 and Echo and the Bunnymen, bands that invariably made a drama out of a crisis.

Reading on mobile? Click here to listen

Spies first releases so far are the Liars Call Me King debut EP from late 2010, the 2011 single Barricade and last year’s single, Distant Shorelines. And now there’s the single November Sun. Their first EP featured Fill the Silence, which with its rolling drums, roiling guitars, tumultuous bass sounds and its military rhythmic attack is like music for battle but could also be a requiem for a dead affair (“I’m not sure you’re trying to be anything, to do anything, but fill the silence”). Falter shifts dramatically between the unadorned singing parts and the bits where the music powerfully charges back in. It is evidently in Irish rockers’ genes to be unironic and emotional: this has the clatter and thrum of U2′s Sunday Bloody Sunday. The singer’s voice swoops low and soars high, expressing urgency and thwarted passion.

All their EPs are available on Spotify, and all are worth checking out, because they remind you that even music this old-fashioned, or unfashionable, has value and can be thrilling. Mint and Lime is the song with the stun-gun guitars that goes quiet-loud, or rather elegiac-eruptive. The guitars on Distant Shorelines have some of the shimmer of My Bloody Valentine, while the lyrics possess a Morrissey-esque flamboyance (“Addicted to the cause/seduced by the tales of the romantic man I once was”).

The latest single, November Sun, finds the singer channelling Jim Morrison and Ian McCulloch (the dark side of the croon, basically), while the guitars are distinctly Edge-y. The references to “my majestic statuette” and “the solace that breaks through” might be too much for some, but others may welcome the pretentious buffoonery, the return of the pompous ass, just in time to take some of the windiness out of Bono’s sails.

The buzz: “Displays the same assured mastery of dynamics that the best rock bands have.”

The truth: Unfashionable but energising pomp-indie

Most likely to: Be praised for their majesty.

Least likely to: Manufacture majestic statuettes.

What to buy: The November Sun EP is released on 18 November.

File next to: National, Interpol, U2, Echo and the Bunnymen.

Links: spies.bandcamp.com.

Tuesday’s new band: Boxed In.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/28/spies-new-band

The haunting music that takes you back 1800 years: Expert records ’100 … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Tuesday 29 October 2013 8:06 am
  • Musical rhythms were preserved in the patterns of words of ancient texts
  • Instruments used are known from paintings and archaeological remains
  • Ancient documents found on stone reveal how the pitch should have risen
  • Dr D’Angour claims the ‘magical’ recordings are 100% accurate

By
Ellie Zolfagharifard

16:19 GMT, 28 October 2013


|

16:22 GMT, 28 October 2013

The beautiful texts of ancient Greece have captivated our imaginations for thousands of years.  

From the tragedies of Sophocles to the epics of Homer, modern literature throughout the world continues to be inspired by these classics.

But the haunting music these poems were originally sung to have long since been lost, with researchers instead focusing on the meaning of the words.

Scroll down to listen to the music…

The music of ancient Greece, which hasn't been heard for more than 2,000 years, is being reconstructed by Armand D'Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University

The music of ancient Greece, which hasn’t been heard for more than 2,000 years, is being reconstructed by Armand D’Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University

Now an expert from Oxford University has reconstructed the music, and rediscovered some of the instruments that played them – and he claims the recordings are 100 per cent accurate.

‘There is no question that we can reconstruct what this fascinating music sounded like,’ Dr Armand D’Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University, told MailOnline.

‘We have been left with clear instructions, thousands of years old, about how to create instruments used to play the music with mathematical precision.’

A fresco painting from Pompeii, Italy.

One of the great Greek lyrists and few known female poets of the ancient world, Sappho was born some time between 630 and 612 BC. Her love poetry would have been composed to music, such as the tune heard above

The result, according to Dr D’Angour, is ‘something quite magical’ which may sound odd to our ears, but was hugely popular with audiences at the time.

To reconstruct the music, Dr D’Angour and his team put together existing clues about the tunes, rhythms and the instruments of the time.

The rhythms, for instance, are preserved in the patterns of long and short syllables in the words of the texts themselves.

The instruments used – such as lyre and reed-pipes -  are known from, paintings and archaeological remains.

An illustration from The Odyssey

The instruments used – such as lyre and reed-pipes – are known from, paintings and archaeological remains, such as this illustration from The Odyssey by Homer

A replica of a Biblical harp in a museum in Haifa
Seiklos

The lyre (left) is a string instrument known for its use in Greek classical antiquity and later. The right image shows the Seikilos epitaph, the oldest surviving example of a complete musical composition. The song is in the ancient Greek musical notation, was found engraved on a tombstone, near Aidin, Turkey

A SONG FROM 200 AD

Some of the surviving melodies are immediately attractive to a modern ear, said Dr D’Angrour.

One complete piece, inscribed on a marble column and dating from around 200 AD, is a haunting short song of four lines composed by Seikilos.

The words of the song may be translated as:

While you’re alive, shine:

Never let your mood decline.

We’ve a brief span of life to spend:

Time necessitates an end.

Meanwhile, ancient documents found on stone in Greece and papyrus in Egypt, reveal exactly how the pitch should have risen throughout the composition.

Inscribed with a vocal notation devised around 450 BC, the documents show alphabetic letters and signs placed above the vowels of the Greek words that reveal the mathematical ratios of musical intervals.

Dr D’Angour said that similar music to that played in ancient Greece can today found in the folk music traditions of Sardinia and Turkey, providing an insight into the sounds and techniques used.

For instance, in ancient Greece, a musical note would go up in pitch on certain syllables and fall on others, rather than being stressed.

Detail from the Ambrosian Iliad

‘One of the things Greeks were fascinating by at all times was the notion of imitation,’ said Dr D’Angour. Pictured is artwork from the Ambrosian Iliad, a 5th century illuminated manuscript of the Iliad of Homer, depicting a battle scene. This poem may would have been set to music to enhance the emotions it evoked

The music of this period also used delicate intervals such as quarter-tones, and the melody was often different to the vocal pitches used in the poems.

‘We’re talking about a period of around 1000 years so there was lots of different styles and sounds that many of which would have been lost,’ said Dr D’Angour.

‘In so far as we’re aware of different sounds the earliest music, say from 5th C BC, are more alien to us that the later music from 200 AD, which sounds a bit like early church melodies.’

Dr D’Angour has only just begun his collaborative two-year project, at the end of which he hopes to uncover exactly what music meant to ancient Greeks.

‘One of the things Greeks were fascinating by at all times was the notion of imitation,’ said Dr D’Angour.

‘The idea that they could find auditory phenomena that could imitate emotion meant that the music had to feel like it had some kind of enhanced meaning.

‘Some of it absolutely haunting but one of the things I feel most of all is that it’s amazing to hear music that hasn’t been heard for 2,000 years.’

The comments below have not been moderated.

ManbythePort,

Cheshire, United Kingdom,

28 minutes ago

Nice, but they should of tuned that lyre before recording.

Edward,

Los Angeles,

3 hours ago

The Seikilos Epitaph has been beautifully reproduced many times by talented contemporary musicians. I recommend the heart stirring and heart breaking rendition by the San Antonio Vocal Arts Ensemble (SAVAE) posted on Youtube. These are infinitely truer in spirit than Dr D’Angour’s, who seems to be taking credit for resurrecting tunes which are alive and well. The Epitaph was written by a man for his departed wife and expresses his heart felt realization of the shortness of our delicate lives and the need to utilize every moment to its fullest, for we live within and are bound by natures laws, personified by the Titan Cronos or Time who ruthlessly demands his toll of us all.

Captain America,

San Antonio, United States,

4 hours ago

It sounds like a late-Beatles tune to me:)

Capt Dan,

jupiter,

5 hours ago

“he claims the recordings are 100 per cent accurate.” Umm, not too many people left to dispute this are there? 100% is a bit too strong for my taste. There are mistakes made in transcribing music that’s just a few decades old. Interesting work though.

Quintus,

Bedford,

1 hour ago

Could you actually read the article. They studied the form of the poetry, illustrations and recreated the instruments and I’d say they didn’t leave a lot to guess work. Should you know more than people who have studied this subject at great depth know more please enlighten us. Have you noticed, should you have bothered to listen to it, noticed how similar it is to medieval tunes composed to go with ballads or story telling? Or did you expect bad Karaoke style modern singing with no talent from people that cannot even read music?

Moochie,

Canton,

5 hours ago

Beats Rap

MigV2131313,

NYNY, United States,

7 hours ago

Maybe you had to be there to fully appreciate it but it sounds just as good as the Incredible String Band and that was only 40 years or so ago.

Stewski,

Hexthorpe, United Kingdom,

7 hours ago

It sounded nothing like it.

bhqz,

Tennessee USA,

7 hours ago

Well, it’s not KISS…

Woody Adopter,

London, United Kingdom,

8 hours ago

Opah!!! lol

Dame Em,

Tickle on the Tum,

11 hours ago

The ancient Greeks worshipped poets and music hence the tales of Orpheus and Sappho. I don’t believe for a moment this is an accurate representation of their musical culture , the proff has probably only succeeded in piecing together an ancient Greek version of chop sticks.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

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Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2478381/The-haunting-music-takes-1-800-years-Expert-records-100-accurate-version-song-heard-ancient-Greece.html

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