Incredible underwater headphones that transmit music to swimmers’ ears by … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 9:26 pm
  • The Neptune headphones and mp3 player mimic the way whales and dolphins communicate underwater
  • Sound is transmitted through the cheekbones to the cochlea part of the ear
  • The 4GB device holds 1,000 songs and costs £100

By
Jennifer Smith

17:31 GMT, 29 September 2013


|

16:11 GMT, 30 September 2013

A bizarre new technology allows swimmers to listen to music while underwater, by conducting sound through the bones in the human skull.

The Neptune headphones send sound waves to the inner ears through swimmer’s cheekbones, resulting in them being able to hear music in their heads.

The device mimics the way dolphins and whales communicate in the water by transmitting sound vibrations.

The device has been popular among recreational swimmers who can listen to up to 1,000 songs on the mp3 player which rests on their goggles

The device has been popular among recreational swimmers who can listen to up to 1,000 songs on the mp3 player which rests on their goggles

A waterproof mp3 player streams the
music which resonates through the bones and into the highly sensitive
cochlea part of the ear.

The headphones take inspiration from a 1970s product which transmitted music through the collarbone in the same way. 

Dave Seiler, from US
manufacturers Finis, said: ‘Back in the 70s there was a product called
the Bone Fone, a floppy tube that was worn round the neck and
transferred sound into users’ collarbones.

The Neptune underwater headphones and mp3 player transmit sound vibrations through swimmers' cheekbones and into their inner ear

The Neptune underwater headphones and mp3 player transmit sound vibrations through swimmers’ cheekbones and into their inner ear

The £100 device mimics the way dolphins and whales communicate underwater

The £100 device mimics the way dolphins and whales listen to each other underwater

‘The product wasn’t very successful and so the technology lay dormant until recently when we revived it.

‘We have come along way since those times and have now launched a truly unique product in the Neptune.

‘Bone conduction is perfect for using under water because there is no air for sound to travel though.

The Neptune takes inspiration from a 1970s product, the Bone Fone which transmitted sound through the collarbone

The Neptune takes inspiration from the Bone Fone which transmitted sound through the collarbone

‘The speakers of the Neptune sit on the cheek just in front of the ear.

‘These speakers then send vibrations through the cheek bones to the inner ear.

‘The result is an incredible audio experience that makes you feel like the music is playing inside your head.
‘It is the same way that whales and dolphins listen to one another.

‘Having the music just appear in your head is quite surreal but once swimmers get used to it they love it.

‘Neptune
has been a real hit with recreational swimmers, and it can store 1,000
songs so the user will run out of energy long before they run out of
music.’

The Neptune, which holds holds 1,000 songs, costs  £100 and can be bought at finisinc.com.

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

Jetty,

London, United Kingdom,

6 hours ago

Dunno. Swimming has a lot of risks involved so I’m not sure it’s a good idea to have a pool full of people that can’t hear a lot. There is a lifeguard for a reason usually.

Civrasien,

Vincennes_France,

6 hours ago

Not new technology. We had them in the Royal Navy when I was a diver in the 60′s & 70′s. They’re called bone transducers.

Roy IoW,

Ryde,

7 hours ago

The only new thing about these headphones is their ability to hear sounds/music under water. When I was in Signals in the RAF, we always wored our (old fashioned now) headphones in front of our ears and not on top of them. It stopped the lugholes from getting sweating and sore, and the sounds were just as clear from the skull in front of the ears. Plus it was easier to hear someone if they needed to speak to me.

Gary,

Midlands,

8 hours ago

Soundbites pop radio anybody?

Brit abroad,

Florida,

8 hours ago

WHY ? just more noise pollution.I go swimming to escape noise and relax why would I need extra noise ?Sad that people need to be plugged in all the time!!

Jess,

Sydney,

8 hours ago

This is hardly new technology, nor has it lied dormant since the 70s. Bone conducted audio has been consistently in use for decades. Bone Anchored Hearing Aids work this way. The Sydney Harbour Bridge climb has been using a bone conducted head set for over a decade. That said, bone conductors do make appropriate hearing devices for underwater use.

Paulio,

Halifax,

12 hours ago

I suppose they’ll be listening to that new wave music….

Bemused American,

Northwest, United States,

12 hours ago

Is there no place free from outside noises? Give me the peace and quiet of swimming a few laps.

slowman,

Glasgow,

12 hours ago

Are we so unable to manage our thoughts that we need music even while swimming? I’m still intrigued to know if they would be any use to a deaf person?

irwin,

Gravesend UK, United Kingdom,

13 hours ago

I will buy a pair so I can listen to my Wet wet wet album.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Who is this week’s top commenter?
Find out now

Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2437574/Incredible-underwater-headphones-transmit-music-swimmers-ears-vibrating-sound-cheekbones.html

Incredible underwater headphones that transmit music to swimmers’ ears by … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 4:21 pm
  • The Neptune headphones and mp3 player mimic the way whales and dolphins communicate underwater
  • Sound is transmitted through the cheekbones to the cochlea part of the ear
  • The 4GB device holds 1,000 songs and costs £100

By
Jennifer Smith

17:31 GMT, 29 September 2013


|

17:44 GMT, 29 September 2013

A bizarre new technology allows swimmers to listen to music while underwater, by conducting sound through the bones in the human skull.

The Neptune headphones send sound waves to the inner ears through swimmer’s cheekbones, resulting in them being able to hear music in their heads.

The device mimics the way dolphins and whales communicate in the water by transmitting sound vibrations.

The device has been popular among recreational swimmers who can listen to up to 1,000 songs on the mp3 player which rests on their goggles

The device has been popular among recreational swimmers who can listen to up to 1,000 songs on the mp3 player which rests on their goggles

A waterproof mp3 player streams the
music which resonates through the bones and into the highly sensitive
cochlea part of the ear.

The headphones take inspiration from a 1970s product which transmitted music through the collarbone in the same way. 

Dave Seiler, from US
manufacturers Finis, said: ‘Back in the 70s there was a product called
the Bone Fone, a floppy tube that was worn round the neck and
transferred sound into users’ collarbones.

The Neptune underwater headphones and mp3 player transmit sound vibrations through swimmers' cheekbones and into their inner ear

The Neptune underwater headphones and mp3 player transmit sound vibrations through swimmers’ cheekbones and into their inner ear

The £100 device mimics the way dolphins and whales communicate underwater

The £100 device mimics the way dolphins and whales listen to each other underwater

‘The product wasn’t very successful and so the technology lay dormant until recently when we revived it.

‘We have come along way since those times and have now launched a truly unique product in the Neptune.

‘Bone conduction is perfect for using under water because there is no air for sound to travel though.

The Neptune takes inspiration from a 1970s product, the Bone Fone which transmitted sound through the collarbone

The Neptune takes inspiration from the Bone Fone which transmitted sound through the collarbone

‘The speakers of the Neptune sit on the cheek just in front of the ear.

‘These speakers then send vibrations through the cheek bones to the inner ear.

‘The result is an incredible audio experience that makes you feel like the music is playing inside your head.
‘It is the same way that whales and dolphins listen to one another.

‘Having the music just appear in your head is quite surreal but once swimmers get used to it they love it.

‘Neptune
has been a real hit with recreational swimmers, and it can store 1,000
songs so the user will run out of energy long before they run out of
music.’

The Neptune, which holds holds 1,000 songs, costs  £100 and can be bought at finisinc.com.

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

Jetty,

London, United Kingdom,

1 hour ago

Dunno. Swimming has a lot of risks involved so I’m not sure it’s a good idea to have a pool full of people that can’t hear a lot. There is a lifeguard for a reason usually.

Civrasien,

Vincennes_France,

1 hour ago

Not new technology. We had them in the Royal Navy when I was a diver in the 60′s & 70′s. They’re called bone transducers.

Roy IoW,

Ryde,

2 hours ago

The only new thing about these headphones is their ability to hear sounds/music under water. When I was in Signals in the RAF, we always wored our (old fashioned now) headphones in front of our ears and not on top of them. It stopped the lugholes from getting sweating and sore, and the sounds were just as clear from the skull in front of the ears. Plus it was easier to hear someone if they needed to speak to me.

Gary,

Midlands,

3 hours ago

Soundbites pop radio anybody?

Brit abroad,

Florida,

3 hours ago

WHY ? just more noise pollution.I go swimming to escape noise and relax why would I need extra noise ?Sad that people need to be plugged in all the time!!

Jess,

Sydney,

3 hours ago

This is hardly new technology, nor has it lied dormant since the 70s. Bone conducted audio has been consistently in use for decades. Bone Anchored Hearing Aids work this way. The Sydney Harbour Bridge climb has been using a bone conducted head set for over a decade. That said, bone conductors do make appropriate hearing devices for underwater use.

Paulio,

Halifax,

7 hours ago

I suppose they’ll be listening to that new wave music….

Bemused American,

Northwest, United States,

7 hours ago

Is there no place free from outside noises? Give me the peace and quiet of swimming a few laps.

slowman,

Glasgow,

7 hours ago

Are we so unable to manage our thoughts that we need music even while swimming? I’m still intrigued to know if they would be any use to a deaf person?

irwin,

Gravesend UK, United Kingdom,

7 hours ago

I will buy a pair so I can listen to my Wet wet wet album.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Who is this week’s top commenter?
Find out now

Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2437574/Incredible-underwater-headphones-transmit-music-swimmers-ears-vibrating-sound-cheekbones.html

Learn How To Think And Play Music Like A Pro With Shapes Music For iPad – AppAdvice

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 11:21 am

Want to watch your favorite music videos and learn how to play their accompanying songs at the same time? Then you better start thinking in shapes and download the newly released Shapes Music app for iPad.

“When experienced musicians interact with music, they seldom think in terms of notes, scales or keys,” explains the eponymous development studio behind Shapes Music. “Instead, they’ve translated years of experience into natural shapes and patterns on their instruments.”

Shapes Music applies this principle in enabling you to think like a pro as it guides you in playing music. The app does this by using a unique semitransparent keyboard design that’s superimposed on music videos, allowing you to tap while you watch.

If you can’t see the video embedded above, please click here.

The app lets you search through thousands of songs by title or by artist and lets you build your own custom playlist. Shapes Music’s offered songs run the gamut of musical genre and are culled straight from YouTube. So, make sure that YouTube music content is not blocked in your country in order to get the most out of Shapes Music.

Shapes Music is available now in the App Store for $4.99. The app is compatible with iPad running iOS 5.0 or later.

As noted by Music Ally, there are plans to add other instuments and sounds to Shapes Music.


Source Article from http://appadvice.com/appnn/2013/09/learn-how-to-think-and-play-music-like-a-pro-with-shapes-music-for-ipad

Hiatus Kaiyote (No 1607) – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 11:21 am

Hometown: Melbourne, Australia.

The lineup: Nai Palm (vocals, guitar), Simon Mavin (keyboards), Paul Bender (bass, production), Perrin Moss (drums, production).

The background: Hiatus Kaiyote are a soul group – or “future-soul” group, as they call themselves – for people who listen to Flying Lotus and J Dilla, whose conception of soul is of a music that, at its most expansive and experimental, can incorporate elements of jazz, hip-hop, glitchy electronica, prog and rock. Put it this way: Prince tweeted about the Australian quartet recently,and Animal Collective love them, as does Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson of the Roots. “Once in a blue moon, something moves me so much I’m willing to alienate friends when an UNDENIABLE project comes along,” he gushed. “THIS is that project.” Erykah Badu, too, is in thrall to their off-kilter melodies and fuzzy performances that were born out of jam sessions that were particularly free of form. “OK,” she declared. “I’m done. In love.”

Reading on mobile? Click here to listen

Apparently, their star fans discovered the band via a sort of Chinese Whispers: ”Dave from Animal Collective heard it on the radio, he showed it to Angel from Dirty Projectors, Angel showed it to Questlove, Questlove showed it to James Poyser who works as main writer for [Erykah] Badu, he hipped her to it, since then, it’s been pretty crazy,” explained singer and guitarist Nai Palm, whose songs function as a way for her to “process grief” while also exploring her feelings about “the natural world and other cultures”. The band’s name, meanwhile, is a neologism, conflating “peyote” (a plant with psychoactive properties) and “coyote”, designed to evoke “a sort of Native American Indian shamanistic vibe”. Their album Tawk Tomahawk, which you can sample on Spotify, reflects their hippie, trippy sensibilities. It’s dreamadelic soul – they have a track titled The World It Softly Lulls – that fits very nicely alongside the new wave of black-psych American acts written about in the Guardian last year, all rippling effects and stuttering instrumentation. The songs, vehicles for the free expression of Naim’s troubled psyche, veer from drowsy, soporific funk to more angular numbers with quirky time signatures and others that could be phantasmagoric new age with a touch of cool jazz. A lot of it sounds improvised, but it all should work as a fillip for Monday-morning blues. And we haven’t even mentioned their forthcoming second album, due to feature a track about “a sexually ambiguous dolphin called Tonay who is on his way across the ocean to meet his estranged Dad and confront him about the Christmas that tore them apart”. Just wait till Prince hears that, he’ll go into Tweet overdrive.

The buzz: “Oh. My. Gawd. This. Is. Dope” – Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson of the Roots.

The truth: If it’s good enough for Prince …

Most likely to: Softly lull.

Least likely to: Go on hiatus before they finish that polymorphous dolphin song.

What to buy: You can hear the album Tawk Tomahawk on Spotify.

File next to: J Dilla, Flying Lotus, Little Dragon, Erykah Badu.

Links: hiatuskaiyote.bandcamp.com.

Tuesday’s new band: Jake Emlyn.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/sep/30/hiatus-kaiyote-new-band

#TwitterMusic is an Incredible Way to Discover New music. – The Next Web

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 11:21 am

Screen Shot 2013 09 30 at 12.10.07 PM1 Ive no idea what people are moaning about... Twitter #Music is arguably the best way to discover new music.For the longest time my older brothers would ask what music they should be listening to. They’re all ten years older than me and seem to think I’m clued up on what’s hip and happening (do people still say hip and happening?) but as I’ve gotten older, I’ve done my best to avoid asking nephews and cousins about what I should be listening to and have aimed to find my own way.

Until recently, after various attempts, I settled on a great Spotify App called Tunigo to find great new music. It’s very good. So good in fact that Spotify ended up acquiring the app for itself.  Its primary benefit wasn’t truly discovering new music however, but rather manually compiling music for different tastes, moods and experiences – old music and new.

I still needed a way to find out which new tracks were being listened to by the mainstream AND those in the know, released by popular artists, up & coming artists AND new artists. Tracks that weren’t being played on the radio and backed my millions of dollars, but were being listened to by a passionate group of music aficionados and perhaps slowly but surely gaining popularity in the mainstream. Essentially, I wanted a way to discover great new music, irrespective of whether the artists were signed to a big label, small label or were completely independent.

Hello Twitter #Music.

Screen Shot 2013 09 30 at 12.07.49 PM Ive no idea what people are moaning about... Twitter #Music is arguably the best way to discover new music.After somewhat of a false start with a Web app that clumsily worked with Spotify and Rdio through the browser (which still exists, in fact), Twitter #Music launched a fully-fledged Spotify app and soon after, added integration with Rdio too, making the experience far more streamlined and user friendly.

In no uncertain terms, within about two weeks, Twitter #Music’s Spotify App has now become my de facto route to discovering new music. Rdio also includes all of Twitter’s chart playlists but not quite as elegantly integrated, in my opinion.

Whilst maintaining a clean, simple and highly visual user experience, Twitter has selected a number of well thought out categories to help you discover new music:

  • Superstars - Songs from artists that have big money backing them and songs you’re probably sick of hearing on the radio already
  • Popular - Songs that are trending on Twitter, irrespective of artist status
  • Emerging - Songs that are gradually gaining in popularity, generally from lesser-known artists
  • Unearthed - Songs that are getting some interest from specks of the Twittersphere when listened to
  • Hunted – Songs that are getting decent coverage on music blogs (Pitchfork, FactMag and more…)

If you’re interested in listening to just one genre of music, that’s also possible too. However what you’ll find (and this is where Twitter #Music has room for improvement) is only the most popular tracks within each genre. This can often not change all that much for days or even weeks. I’d love to see similar ‘superstars, popular etc.’ charts for each genre.

Where Twitter also has room for improvement is providing more room for filtering music from specific trending lists. There’s absolutely no way I’ll ever intentionally want to listen to a Chris Brown track for example, same goes for country music and opera. It would also be smart to include an option that excludes songs that a user has listened to more than 5 times, let’s say. If Twitter is aiming to become the way to discover the best new music, these little features would help. Ensuring Twitter #Music doesn’t become a bloated piece of junk is also of paramount importance.

One feature I would also love to see is insight into what specific countries are listening to. I’ve always loved Brazil’s taste in music for example, show me what’s trending there. Similarly, the Middle East’s music taste has always had a great flavor to it, I’d love to know what’s popular there. Its tag line is “The WORLD’s Best New Music”, give me the world!

The requirement to have Spotify or Rdio can be frustrating for some but for a devoted Spotify user – and if you aren’t you should be! – it makes it all the more attractive.

Twitter #Music’s mobile app is also not so great at the moment but thankfully you can essentially ignore it by saving all of Twitter’s lists as playlists in Spotify (even for offline mode) so they’re accessible anywhere.

All in all however, the issues and feature requests are minor tweaks that won’t keep me from using the service in its current form, far from it, I’m actually very impressed with Twitter #Music… Which is really why I’ve been baffled at the lukewarm (at best) reaction from press and Twitter users alike. You’d be hard pressed (and believe me I’ve hunted around) to find anything remotely as powerful to discover great new music. It’s only a matter of time before Facebook and Google+ make their move in this space and I can’t see them getting anywhere near Twitter’s levels of authority.

How do you find new music to listen to online? And have you tried Twitter #Music? What do you make of it? If you haven’t, it’s free, try it now (ideally with Spotify and Rdio) and come back and share your verdict.

Source Article from http://thenextweb.com/twitter/2013/09/30/ive-no-idea-what-people-are-complaining-about-twittermusic-has-become-the-way-i-discover-new-music/

The copyright cartel’s plot to indoctrinate California kindergartens – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 11:21 am

In kindergarten, we teach children to share. By second grade – if people who bring you songs and pixie dust have their way – we’ll amend that in a major way.

Hollywood and the recording industry (aka the Copyright Cartel) are leading the charge to create grade school lessons that – at least, in their draft form, as published by Wired – have a no-compromise message: if someone else created it, you need permission to use it.

Sounds wonderful, until you think about how creativity actually works. And never mind that the law, already tipped in favor of copyright holders, doesn’t hold such an absolutist position.

It’s no surprise to learn that America’s biggest internet service providers – let’s call them the Telecom Cartel, since that’s what they’ve become – are part of this propaganda scheme. It’s sad to learn, however, that the California School Library Association has climbed aboard; the organization helped produce the lessons that, thankfully, are still only in draft form. But they are likely to reach California classrooms later this school year and, presumably, other parts of the nation later on.

Wired obtained some of the draft lesson plans. They’re amazing (and not in a complimentary way). The lesson aimed at second graders (pdf), for example, winds up this way:

We are all creators at some level. We hope others will respect our work and follow what we decide to allow with our photos, art, movies, etc. And we ‘play fair’ with their work too. We are careful to acknowledge the work of authors and creators and respect their ownership. We recognize that it’s hard work to produce something, and we want to get paid for our work.

We’re definitely all becoming creators, and we do want others to respect our work. But in the real world, and under the law, we can’t make all the decisions about what uses we allow of that work. There’s a concept called “fair use” – deliberately ignored in the lesson, on the absurd basis that kids can’t understand it – that explicitly allows others to make use of our work in ways we don’t like, or anticipate. Without fair use, creative works would be next to impossible, because we all build on the work of those who came before us.

Needless to say, this lesson and others made public – including grades one (pdf), five (pdf), and six (pdf) – have sparked a bit of an uproar outside the cartel’s orbit. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation‘s Mitch Stoltz told Wired:

[The material] suggests, falsely, that ideas are property and that building on others’ ideas always requires permission. The overriding message of this curriculum is that students’ time should be consumed not in creating but in worrying about their impact on corporate profits.

What should schools actually be teaching? Happily, there are alternatives honoring copyright, which is important, but that also honor tradition, law and the greater culture.

Creative Commons’ Jane Park has compiled an excellent listing of resources that educators can use to teach about copyright. I’m especially partial to the EFF’s Teaching Copyright, which I’ve recommended to students of all ages, including some college students.

The California School Library Association should never have let itself become a handmaiden to commercial Hollywood. Perhaps, its leaders will realize that they are undermining the crucial role libraries have played in our society when they assist the copyright absolutists’ agenda – because if libraries were invented today, the cartel would declare them to be both illegal and immoral.

I take some solace in a quote of the association’s vice president, Glenn Warren, in the Wired story. Confronted with the inaccuracy and imbalance of the lessons, he acknowledged:

We’ve got some editing to do.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/29/copyright-cartel-indoctrinate-kindergartens

Katy Perry could quit pop music for good and return to her folk roots in … – Mirror.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 11:21 am

Katy Perry is looking to ditch her glitzy pop career in favour of an acoustic guitar – after admitting she’s thinking about going back to folk music.

That’s right – the Roar singer, 28, may have burst on to the scene five years ago with arena anthems like Hot n Cold, but it seems topping the charts wasn’t always her goal.

She told Billboard magazine: “I’ll probably turn into more of a Joni Mitchell. As I inch towards my 30s, I think my fourth record will be more of an acoustic guitar album.”

Saying that, the brunette beauty’s upcoming new album PRISM – released on October 22 – is still in her familiar style, and although a trip back to her acoustic roots is tempting, she’s not set on the big switch just yet.

“That’s where I started when I was first discovered by [songwriter/producer] Glen Ballard and got my first record deal,” She explained. “We’ll see – I can’t get ahead of myself.”

Hardcore fans of Katy might not be surprised that she’s not set on pop music for the rest of her days.

Not only did she release a gospel album under her real name Katy Hudson in 2001, she went in completely the opposite direction when she played annual touring punk festival Warped Tour just after the release of I Kissed A Girl in 2008.

Maybe we shouldn’t be too shocked either – tracks like The One That Got Away and Thinking of You showed her softer side, so it could well be a step in the right direction.

One thing for sure is that Katy will always stay honest in her music, admitting she can only write autobiographically.

She has explained that By the Grace of God, a track on the new album, is about her difficulties dealing with heartbreak after her divorce from Russell Brand.

And, given her recent revelations about her boyfriend John Mayer’s bedroom activities, we’re not sure what direction the next record will go.


 

Source Article from http://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/katy-perry-could-quit-pop-2323068

The copyright cartel’s plot to indoctrinate California kindergartens – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 6:21 am

In kindergarten, we teach children to share. By second grade – if people who bring you songs and pixie dust have their way – we’ll amend that in a major way.

Hollywood and the recording industry (aka the Copyright Cartel) are leading the charge to create grade school lessons that – at least, in their draft form, as published by Wired – have a no-compromise message: if someone else created it, you need permission to use it.

Sounds wonderful, until you think about how creativity actually works. And never mind that the law, already tipped in favor of copyright holders, doesn’t hold such an absolutist position.

It’s no surprise to learn that America’s biggest internet service providers – let’s call them the Telecom Cartel, since that’s what they’ve become – are part of this propaganda scheme. It’s sad to learn, however, that the California School Library Association has climbed aboard; the organization helped produce the lessons that, thankfully, are still only in draft form. But they are likely to reach California classrooms later this school year and, presumably, other parts of the nation later on.

Wired obtained some of the draft lesson plans. They’re amazing (and not in a complimentary way). The lesson aimed at second graders (pdf), for example, winds up this way:

We are all creators at some level. We hope others will respect our work and follow what we decide to allow with our photos, art, movies, etc. And we ‘play fair’ with their work too. We are careful to acknowledge the work of authors and creators and respect their ownership. We recognize that it’s hard work to produce something, and we want to get paid for our work.

We’re definitely all becoming creators, and we do want others to respect our work. But in the real world, and under the law, we can’t make all the decisions about what uses we allow of that work. There’s a concept called “fair use” – deliberately ignored in the lesson, on the absurd basis that kids can’t understand it – that explicitly allows others to make use of our work in ways we don’t like, or anticipate. Without fair use, creative works would be next to impossible, because we all build on the work of those who came before us.

Needless to say, this lesson and others made public – including grades one (pdf), five (pdf), and six (pdf) – have sparked a bit of an uproar outside the cartel’s orbit. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation‘s Mitch Stoltz told Wired:

[The material] suggests, falsely, that ideas are property and that building on others’ ideas always requires permission. The overriding message of this curriculum is that students’ time should be consumed not in creating but in worrying about their impact on corporate profits.

What should schools actually be teaching? Happily, there are alternatives honoring copyright, which is important, but that also honor tradition, law and the greater culture.

Creative Commons’ Jane Park has compiled an excellent listing of resources that educators can use to teach about copyright. I’m especially partial to the EFF’s Teaching Copyright, which I’ve recommended to students of all ages, including some college students.

The California School Library Association should never have let itself become a handmaiden to commercial Hollywood. Perhaps, its leaders will realize that they are undermining the crucial role libraries have played in our society when they assist the copyright absolutists’ agenda – because if libraries were invented today, the cartel would declare them to be both illegal and immoral.

I take some solace in a quote of the association’s vice president, Glenn Warren, in the Wired story. Confronted with the inaccuracy and imbalance of the lessons, he acknowledged:

We’ve got some editing to do.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/29/copyright-cartel-indoctrinate-kindergartens

The copyright cartel’s plot to indoctrinate California kindergartens – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Monday 30 September 2013 1:21 am

In kindergarten, we teach children to share. By second grade – if people who bring you songs and pixie dust have their way – we’ll amend that in a major way.

Hollywood and the recording industry (aka the Copyright Cartel) are leading the charge to create grade school lessons that – at least, in their draft form, as published by Wired – have a no-compromise message: if someone else created it, you need permission to use it.

Sounds wonderful, until you think about how creativity actually works. And never mind that the law, already tipped in favor of copyright holders, doesn’t hold such an absolutist position.

It’s no surprise to learn that America’s biggest internet service providers – let’s call them the Telecom Cartel, since that’s what they’ve become – are part of this propaganda scheme. It’s sad to learn, however, that the California School Library Association has climbed aboard; the organization helped produce the lessons that, thankfully, are still only in draft form. But they are likely to reach California classrooms later this school year and, presumably, other parts of the nation later on.

Wired obtained some of the draft lesson plans. They’re amazing (and not in a complimentary way). The lesson aimed at second graders (pdf), for example, winds up this way:

We are all creators at some level. We hope others will respect our work and follow what we decide to allow with our photos, art, movies, etc. And we ‘play fair’ with their work too. We are careful to acknowledge the work of authors and creators and respect their ownership. We recognize that it’s hard work to produce something, and we want to get paid for our work.

We’re definitely all becoming creators, and we do want others to respect our work. But in the real world, and under the law, we can’t make all the decisions about what uses we allow of that work. There’s a concept called “fair use” – deliberately ignored in the lesson, on the absurd basis that kids can’t understand it – that explicitly allows others to make use of our work in ways we don’t like, or anticipate. Without fair use, creative works would be next to impossible, because we all build on the work of those who came before us.

Needless to say, this lesson and others made public – including grades one (pdf), five (pdf), and six (pdf) – have sparked a bit of an uproar outside the cartel’s orbit. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation‘s Mitch Stoltz told Wired:

[The material] suggests, falsely, that ideas are property and that building on others’ ideas always requires permission. The overriding message of this curriculum is that students’ time should be consumed not in creating but in worrying about their impact on corporate profits.

What should schools actually be teaching? Happily, there are alternatives honoring copyright, which is important, but that also honor tradition, law and the greater culture.

Creative Commons’ Jane Park has compiled an excellent listing of resources that educators can use to teach about copyright. I’m especially partial to the EFF’s Teaching Copyright, which I’ve recommended to students of all ages, including some college students.

The California School Library Association should never have let itself become a handmaiden to commercial Hollywood. Perhaps, its leaders will realize that they are undermining the crucial role libraries have played in our society when they assist the copyright absolutists’ agenda – because if libraries were invented today, the cartel would declare them to be both illegal and immoral.

I take some solace in a quote of the association’s vice president, Glenn Warren, in the Wired story. Confronted with the inaccuracy and imbalance of the lessons, he acknowledged:

We’ve got some editing to do.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/29/copyright-cartel-indoctrinate-kindergartens

Congrats on MP3ing your music… but WHY bother? Time for my ripping yarn – Register

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Sunday 29 September 2013 3:14 pm

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Something for the Weekend, Sir? Good news. A year on from the ICT debacle at my son’s school, he has ditched the joint and found another place where his skills are more appreciated.

Faithful readers may remember – as for all you unfaithful readers, I understand the political parlance is to call you “sluts” – that a couple of days before he was due to embark upon that mighty educational experience and life-affirming struggle known as A Levels, the school decided that timetabling his ICT lessons was too complicated for them to be arsed with, and thus phoned up to tell him to pick another subject instead.

He chose Drama.

I don’t mean to overrate my progeny’s affinity for computing but I remain shocked even now that his potential career in digital things could be dispensed with in such an off-hand manner by The Powers That Ought To Know Better. What if a spotty, teenaged Tim Berners-Lee had been told he had to drop Maths in favour of Home Economics, or a timetable cock-up had forced a youthful Stephen Hawking out of Physics and into Tap-Dancing classes?

Just imagining a world in which Berners-Lee is a celebrity chef while Hawking is an X Factor judge is enough to make my head spin. What if Richard Dawkins had been bumped off the zoology course at Balliol College and sent to a seminary instead? What if Bill Gates had left school at 16 to get a labouring job on a road-digging crew? Oh, don’t tempt me.

Inevitably, my son’s first year in sixth form was a shambles, but as Manilow B (Yr 9) might have put it, he made it through the rain, and achieved the grades A C D C.

For those about to rock, eh?

With such auspicious grades, my son had no choice other than to land himself a place at the School of Rock. And so he did. He is now in Freshers’ Week, which I imagine involves going to gigs around the town, carrying binoculars in order to get a better view of the lead guitarist’s chord sequences.

Upon securing his place at the end of the summer holidays, he received a congratulatory present to die for: my brother-in-law handed over a trunk containing his entire collection of several hundred audio CDs. It’s wide-ranging in style and all top-quality material. Several weeks later, we’re still looking at the jewel cases stacked up near the front door. Where the heck is he going to find the time to rip all those CDs? He did a few and then had to move on: this dude has other things on his mind, such as scales to practise, driving lessons to take and Steam updates to download.

Personally, I like the idea of audio CDs in the same way that I liked vinyl albums and 45 RPM singles before them. Because they are physical objects you can pick up and throw around, you can share them very easily. When I buy music, I pay extra for the CD so that my wife and kids can pop it into the hi-fi when they like, and they do the same for me.

What CDs are rubbish at, though, are party playlists and personal stereos, but there you go. My view is that you can always rip a CD for personal use with a clear conscience, but copying your MP3s to lend to someone else feels exactly like the infant-slaughtering piracy that the law says it is.

Tower records

Back to the Manhattan skyline of CDs in their jewel cases at the front door, and we’re not sure how to tackle them. We now have so many CDs that finding the one you’re looking for is no longer an option. Years ago, my wife tried putting ours in alphabetic order in racks. Then I bought a new CD and put it in the wrong slot in the rack, causing a shift in the Earth’s axis, producing volcanic eruptions and plagues of locusts before triggering the End of Days itself.

Up until this point, I was dismissive of seemingly pointless products such as digital jukeboxes like the Brennan JBs. Actually, I’m still dismissive: what are they for? Don’t answer, I already know. They are for fuddy duddies who don’t own a computer and therefore can’t make MP3s by themselves. Or maybe not. I just don’t understand them.

Perhaps what I need is one of those old multi-tray CD jukeboxes – not a Wurlitzer but those expensive things that we used to keep in the network backup storage cupboard back in the day – to load them and rip them ten at a time. Do these still exist? Can they be automated via iTunes? Have I nothing better to do than concern myself with this?

My son probably wonders what I’m bothered about, since his smartphone can only hold about 4GB of music and he’s dropped it so many times that the headphone socket doesn’t work any more anyway.

When he wants to listen to one of his uncle’s CDs, he goes to the front door to fetch it, takes it out of its case and puts it into his laptop. He feels absolutely no compulsion to devise devious ways of wasting a week of life filling fragile hard disk space with illegally produced MP3 files, some of which he may never ever listen to.

Ultimately, this is not an issue about how to rip multiple CDs – which has been discussed to death online for the last decade – but a question of how I want to listen to music. Do I really need instant access to everything? I’m happy to keep a big bunch of e-books on my tablet, for example, without feeling compelled to copy the entire Gutenberg Project to it.

Probably the best thing is for me to don a red tracksuit, get a curly perm, grow a thin moustache and say to myself: “Calm down, calm down.” Getting my open-crotches in a twist over digitising every bloody thing that comes my way is getting out of hand. The physical, tactile portability of music on a disc is a joy, not an obstacle.

The process is simple: want music, get music, put music in magic box, listen. Why mess about with that? ®

Alistair DabbsAlistair Dabbs is a freelance technology tart, juggling IT journalism, editorial training and digital publishing. The best personal MP3 player he ever owned was a gigantic no-brand housebrick with a belt clip. Wearing it under a jumper made him look pregnant and it spontaneously erased its own memory every two weeks but the audio quality was like nothing he has heard before or since.

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Source Article from http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/09/27/something_for_the_weekend_mp3s_vs_cds/

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