MTV Video Music Awards 2013: Why everybody’s talking about Miley Cyrus and … – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 27 agosto 2013 6:39 pm

Miley Cyrus has twerked, gyrated and grinded her way into a new look faster
than you can say MTV Video Music Awards. She is clearly keen to shed her
childhood star image. In the blink of an eye, it seems, this little girl – a
teen idol cast in the TV series Hannah Montana – has grown up. She is
now a woman: not a teen, not a girl. And for Miley, this ‘woman’ hasn’t
wasted any time in portraying herself as a half-naked, tongue-sticky-outy
‘package’ complete with oodles of sex appeal: not unlike most of the girls
you see gyrating about in today’s music videos.

Within hours, the Buzzfeed site was posting the «15
Weirdest and Craziest Moments
» from Miley’s performance, which
was aired live from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

So what’s really new here? There have been countless performances over the
years of good girls gone bad: just think back to Rihanna’s
risqué performance
on The X Factor a few years’ back. Her
gyrating and grinding drew many complaints from viewers who said it wasn’t
appropriate on a family show.

Rihanna performs on X Factor Photo: REX FEATURES

Miley’s memorable moment was certainly great for MTV and social media. An
estimated 10.1 million people watched the annual program on Sunday night, up
66pc over last year for a show that is fueled by the buzz from talked-about
moments, the Nielsen company said.

Miley’s performance eclipsed Lady Gaga’s opening performance of her new
single, Katy Perry’s closing rendition of her latest hit and Kanye West’s
artsy set. The 20-year-old even grabbed more attention than Justin
Timberlake’s reunion with his ‘N Sync band mates.

So does it really matter? The fact Miley was accompanied mid-performance by
Robin Thicke for a rendition of his number one single Blurred
Lines’ – which has also attracted a lot of controversy this summer

– is in effect, a two-fingers up to those who sniffed at this in the first
place. It’s just a laugh. It’s just a video. Just a performance … isn’t
it?

Either way, their performance immediately began trending on Twitter, with a
record-breaking 306,000 tweets per minute set during Cyrus’ medley of her
song ‘We Can’t Stop’ and Thicke’s ‘Blurred’ Lines’.

The reaction

Fellow Disney star Selena Gomez, 21, praised the performance, describing it as
“amazing. I loved it”. Other stars appeared less positive, however. Despite
having sparked controversy for her raunchy performance and scantily-clad
outfit during her song on the X Factor Final in 2010, Rihanna also appeared
to look less than impressed. Stars including Taylor Swift and One Direction
also seemingly looked awkward as Cyrus strutted around the stage.

The VMAS are renowned for controversial and dramatic performances. In 2003
Britney Spears and Madonna shocked audiences by sharing a kiss onstage.

August 2003: Britney Spears (left) gets a kiss on the mouth from Madonna
during the opening act of the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards

Cyrus wasn’t the only pop singer with edge at the 2013 VMAs. Swift also turned
heads. The 23-year-old, who won best female video, appeared to utter an
expletive to Gomez when Swift’s rumored ex, One Direction member Harry
Styles, was onstage.

Did it work?

Regardless, what’s clear is that Miley, like many, many other artists before
her, used the world’s stage at the MTV VMA awards to show the world – and
her potential fanbase – what she’s all about now, long after she was cast as
the Disney TV character. Whether we like it or not, she has followed in the
footsteps of many other female teen stars who ‘grow up’ and for them,
somehow, that means behaving and looking like a sex symbol. (Just think
Holly Valance, the former Neighbours star who quickly transformed
into a semi-naked goddess on the cover of a lads’ mag
).

Brooke Shields, who played Miley’s TV mother in Hannah Montana called
Miley’s act «desparate»
.
Whether you agree or not, it
seems almost inevitable that for many young women in the pop music world,
marketing yourself to the masses equates to the old adage of «sex sells»
more easily than it should.

Whether Miley will shed her childhood label of Hannah Montana in the
process depends on whether people stop referring to her as the former Disney
star. And yet, in the light of her most recent performance, this little fact
is one that many a column inch will find it hard to ignore.

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/10267842/MTV-Video-Music-Awards-2013-Miley-Cyrus-and-that-performance-the-reasons-why-everybodys-talking-about-it.html

Liverpool International Music Festival ‘a success’ – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 27 agosto 2013 6:39 pm







Fireworks as part of Liverpool festivalFireworks following the Liverpool Royal Philharmonic performance


Organisers of the Liverpool International Music Festival have hailed their first four-day event as a success.

The festival combined pop and classical music at Sefton Park and the Pier Head over the Bank holiday weekend.

Merseyside Police said there had been nine arrests during the event – six over Saturday and Sunday, and three on Monday.

But festival director Claire McColgan said it had been a «fantastic weekend».

«Our ambition is to create an Edinburgh Festival for music,» she said.


Soul II Soul

«It went better than we thought, it was just fantastic – it was much bigger than Mathew Street (festival).

«We’ve been planning it for five months. Just seeing thousands of families having a fantastic weekend together just makes it worthwhile.»

The festival began on Friday with the Liverpool Royal Philharmonic Orchestra led by chief conductor Vasily Petrenko, at Sefton Park, and fireworks.

Among the bands playing were The Saturdays, Soul II Soul, The Christians, Little Mix and JLS.


‘Phoenix rising’

Jazzie B from Soul II Soul said: «We drove down Penny Lane to soak up the atmosphere. I feel so energetic, I feel like 16 again. I’ve always loved Liverpool.»

Gary Christian, of the Christians, said it would be fantastic if the festival was held every year as he found it «friendlier and better» than the Mathew Street Festival.

«It’s like a phoenix rising from the depths of despair. Now we’re becoming more international and more on the map – not just this provincial little town,» he said.

The festival continues with The Farm and Amsterdam at Stanley Park on 8 September.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-23849242

MTV Video Music Awards 2013: Why everybody’s talking about Miley Cyrus and … – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 27 agosto 2013 1:32 pm

Miley Cyrus has twerked, gyrated and grinded her way into a new look faster
than you can say MTV Video Music Awards. She is clearly keen to shed her
childhood star image. In the blink of an eye, it seems, this little girl – a
teen idol cast in the TV series Hannah Montana – has grown up. She is
now a woman: not a teen, not a girl. And for Miley, this ‘woman’ hasn’t
wasted any time in portraying herself as a half-naked, tongue-sticky-outy
‘package’ complete with oodles of sex appeal: not unlike most of the girls
you see gyrating about in today’s music videos.

Within hours, the Buzzfeed site was posting the «15
Weirdest and Craziest Moments
» from Miley’s performance, which
was aired live from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

So what’s really new here? There have been countless performances over the
years of good girls gone bad: just think back to Rihanna’s
risqué performance
on The X Factor a few years’ back.
Her gyrating and grinding drew many complaints from viewers who said it
wasn’t appropriate on a family show.

Rihanna performs on X Factor Photo: REX FEATURES

Miley’s memorable moment was certainly great for MTV and social media. An
estimated 10.1 million people watched the annual program on Sunday night, up
66pc over last year for a show that is fueled by the buzz from talked-about
moments, the Nielsen company said.

Miley’s performance eclipsed Lady Gaga’s opening performance of her new
single, Katy Perry’s closing rendition of her latest hit and Kanye West’s
artsy set. The 20-year-old even grabbed more attention than Justin
Timberlake’s reunion with his ‘N Sync band mates.

A shot of Robin Thicke in the controversial video for Blurred Lines.

So does it really matter? The fact Miley was accompanied mid-performance by
Robin Thicke for a rendition of his number one single Blurred
Lines’ – which has also attracted a lot of controversy this summer

– is in effect, a two-fingers up to those who sniffed at this in the first
place. It’s just a laugh. It’s just a video. Just a performance … isn’t
it?

Either way, their performance immediately began trending on Twitter, with a
record-breaking 306,000 tweets per minute set during Cyrus’ medley of her
song ‘We Can’t Stop’ and Thicke’s ‘Blurred’ Lines’.

The reaction

Fellow Disney star Selena Gomez, 21, praised the performance, describing it as
“amazing. I loved it”. Other stars appeared less positive, however. Despite
having sparked controversy for her raunchy performance and scantily-clad
outfit during her song on the X Factor Final in 2010, Rihanna also appeared
to look less than impressed. Stars including Taylor Swift and One Direction
also seemingly looked awkward as Cyrus strutted around the stage.

The VMAS are renowned for controversial and dramatic performances. In 2003
Britney Spears and Madonna shocked audiences by sharing a kiss onstage.

August 2003: Britney Spears (left) gets a kiss on the mouth from Madonna
during the opening act of the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards

Cyrus wasn’t the only pop singer with edge at the 2013 VMAs. Swift also turned
heads. The 23-year-old, who won best female video, appeared to utter an
expletive to Gomez when Swift’s rumored ex, One Direction member Harry
Styles, was onstage.

Did it work?

Regardless, what’s clear is that Miley, like many, many other artists before
her, used the world’s stage at the MTV VMA awards to show the world – and
her potential fanbase – what she’s all about now, long after she was cast as
the Disney TV character. Whether we like it or not, she has followed in the
footsteps of many other female teen stars who ‘grow up’ and for them,
somehow, that means behaving and looking like a sex symbol. (Just think
Holly Valance, the former Neighbours star who quickly transformed
into a semi-naked goddess on the cover of a lads’ mag
).

Brooke Shields, who played Miley’s TV mother in Hannah Montana called
Miley’s act «desparate»
. Whether you agree or not,
it seems almost inevitable that for many young women in the pop music world,
marketing yourself to the masses equates to the old adage of «sex sells»
more easily than it should.

Whether Miley will shed her childhood label of Hannah Montana in the
process depends on whether people stop referring to her as the former Disney
star. And yet, in the light of her most recent performance, this little fact
is one that many a column inch will find it hard to ignore.

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/10267842/MTV-Video-Music-Awards-2013-Miley-Cyrus-and-that-performance-the-reasons-why-everybodys-talking-about-it.html

Justice Collective and Michael Molloy honoured at Liverpool Music Awards – Liverpool Echo

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 27 agosto 2013 8:29 am

Tributes were paid to the 96 victims of the Hillsborough disaster as The Justice Collective’s Christmas number one single was given the judges’ special award at a ceremony celebrating Liverpool music.


 

The cover of He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother landed the top spot on the Official Christmas Singles’ Chart.

Hillsborough Justice Collective members pick up the number one award at Radio One
Hillsborough Justice Collective members pick up the number one award at Radio One

 

Members of the collective –  which included Peter Hooton and The Farm, Rebecca Ferguson, Paloma Faith, Gerry Marsden and Holly Johnson – picked up the award from Walton MP Steve Rotheram.

In another emotional moment Single of The Year was awarded to Rise & Fall, the song recorded by teenage Liverpool musician Michael Molloy with his friend Alex Evans.

Michael was one of three  people killed in the Bestival crash, in Surrey, last September.

Michael Molloy who was killed in a coach crash on the way home from Bestival
Michael Molloy who was killed in a coach crash on the way home from Bestival

 

The song, which had production support from Bestival’s record label Sunday Best and BBC Radio 1 DJ Rob Da Bank, reached number 38 in the charts earlier this year.

Radio 1 favourite Miles Kane won album of the year with Don’t Forget Who You Are  while the album’s producer and co-writer – Lightning Seeds frontman Ian Broudie – won Producer of the Year.

The Liverpool Music Awards, sponsored by Liverpool City Council, took place at St George’s Hall.

Mayor of Liverpool Joe Anderson said: “What a  fantastic celebration of Liverpool’s musical talent.

“It was an evening to remember with stand-out performances from local artists right through to the touching tribute to Michael Molloy which recognised a young man who, in his short life, showed a real  passion for music.

“I was honoured to be part of  the evening which, now in its second year, has clearly become a staple event in the music industry calendar.”

There were live  performances by The Valentine Brothers, Milly Pye, Miss Stylie, GhostChant, Miles Christian, Natalie McCool, Dominic Dunn, Anna Corcoran, Robert  Vincent, Bill Ryder-Jones, Bird, Broken Men, KOF, The  Sundowners and Paul Duffy.

There was a collaboration between the ECHO’s winning artist Tree Top and the award-winning  Sense of Sound Choir.

The Philharmonic Hall won Best Music Venue while Best Music Business went to Elevator Studios.

Best Band was awarded to The Hummingbirds and DJ of the Year was Anton Powers.

The Lifetime Achievement award was given to Bill Butler.

Billy’s son DJ Lee Butler said: “I’m thrilled to bits about my dad picking up the lifetime achievement award. No-one deserves one more.

“He’s so humble and always willing to help up and coming artists. But does this mean I have to wait 30 years to get mine? Seriously, well done dad.

“Also a big well done to my mate Anton Powers for keeping the best DJ award at Radio City.”

In a surprise twist the event’s host BBC Radio 2 DJ Janice Long won the Outstanding Contribution To Music presented by Dave Monks.

Mr Monks said: “Janice is a national treasure, but more than that she’s a Liverpool treasure. Growing up I listened to her show and it was a real inspiration. I got my first work experience at Crash FM –  without that help from Janice I don’t know if I’d be doing this job.”

“She broke the mould, championing new music and never being afraid to let people have a chance. I can’t think of anyone who deserves that award.”

Awards director Ellie Phillips said: «I’m delighted with how well it  has gone, all of the performances were spectacular, and the turn out to  support the nominees and the awards in general was brilliant.

“St George’s Hall was the perfect setting, and the atmosphere was so upbeat, everyone seemed to have a great time.

“I love seeing the winners’ reactions, especially to the four secret categories because they have no idea that they were even put forward for an award, so they’re always very moved which is heartwarming.”

See the full list of winners here.

Source Article from http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/hillsborough-justice-collective-michael-molloy-5785316

How music cured the blues – The Independent

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 27 agosto 2013 8:29 am

Firefighters cut Campbell out of his car, which had been struck head-on by a speeding teenage driver. They and a team of surgeons would save his life, but they could not rescue large chunks of his brain that had been starved of oxygen. As the guitarist came round, he would discover he no longer had the use of his smashed left leg, eye or arm. He could learn to live without limbs but a life without music threatened to rupture his soul.

«Guitar has always been the channel for all my emotions, angst – everything,» Campbell, 62, says at his home in Farnborough, Surrey. «Blues is the ultimate expression of that emotion. When I became aware of my view of the rest of my life, I felt utter despair. I didn’t think I would walk again or ever play the guitar.» Later, he adds, «despair became rage, and then a feeling of total grief.»

When he got home after months of treatment and rehabilitation, his guitars rested on their stands as cruel, silent reminders of a different life. «I could only look at them but I couldn’t pick them up,» he recalls. «Just being aware of music and what other musicians were doing made me feel even more of a sense of loss and lack of control.»

Physiotherapy helped Campbell regain the use of his leg, but his arm and eye remain dead. Counselling, meanwhile, helped him resolve the anger he felt towards the 19-year-old driver, who admitted to losing control on a bend. But without music, Campbell’s biggest wounds would never heal. It was a case worker at the insurance company dealing with the accident who suggested a possible remedy. Campbell was sceptical at first.

«I had a bit of a prejudiced view of music therapy,» he admits. «I thought it was all about helping disabled children bang drums, which is terrible of me, but I just didn’t know what it was going to give me. I was adamant I wouldn’t go.»

Campbell’s partner, Julianne, a nurse who has also become his carer, persuaded him to try a session. He travelled to Croydon and a therapy centre run by Nordoff Robbins, a leading national music charity. Lindsay McHale, a classically trained musician who enjoyed a first career as a record-company executive, remembers well her first meeting with Campbell, almost two years after his crash.

«He was quite hopeless and uncertain about how I was going to be able to help him. I think he was also unsure of the quality of musicianship involved in therapy, that it was just playing a triangle not very well, so he first asked me to play a Chopin piece on the piano.»

It was the first time McHale, 37, had worked with a professional musician. Campbell got his first electric guitar as a teenager in the mid-1960s. Inspired by the evolving sounds of musicians such as Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry and Eric Clapton, he taught himself to play blues. Within a few years he was performing at top venues with the Levee Camp Moan band. Spells followed with the Nashville Teens and his own Ian Campbell Band, while he remained the lead guitarist with the King Earl Boogie Band.

McHale did not normally grant requests to play herself, but felt it was important in Campbell’s case. And so she sat at the piano and played the «Raindrop prelude». «It completely changed the dynamic,» she recalls. Campbell agreed to come back. Soon McHale encouraged him to touch a guitar for the first time, and then to put one on his lap. By using only the fingers of his right hand to pluck the strings over the neck of the instrument while fretting at the same time, Campbell realised he could create a sound he liked. With McHale’s accompaniment on the piano, he had a go at George Gershwin’s «Summertime».

«It was a revelation to me,» he says. «I couldn’t believe what I was doing. I was crying, which surprised me. It was the moment I realised I could do so much with one hand.» With those few notes Campbell found hope. After two years of tuneless despair he threw himself back into practice, sometimes spending eight hours a day perfecting his one-handed technique.

In Farnborough, Campbell limps from his kitchen to his music room and sits with his Fret-King Super-matic electric guitar, which uses a built-in computer to tune itself, leaving his one hand free to play. He says there are some things he can’t do, but a listener with closed eyes would not know he had any impairment; Campbell’s technique is startling, his five fingers doing the work of 10 as they dance over the strings.

«It sounds like a cliché, but being able to do this was like being born again,» he says while playing «Hoochie Coochie Man», the 1950s blues classic. «I thought I’d lost this completely and suddenly I had a route to get out my feeling and emotions again. Blues is about your soul shouting out. I’d got my soul back.»

McHale admits she did not expect Campbell to reach the level he has. Her job was not to rebuild a professional musician, but to help him regain at least some of what music had given him – confidence, a sense of worth, a social life, control. The therapy also helped heal his brain, restoring some of the memory he had lost in the crash.

As early as the 1940s, physical therapists observed the effects of music on injured soldiers learning to walk again. Rhythm has since been shown to help bring order to the brains of patients with neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s. Singing «American Pie» and other simple songs helped Gabrielle Giffords, the US congresswoman shot in the head in 2011, learn to speak again.

In the late 1950s, Paul Nordoff, an American musician, and Clive Robbins, a teacher, founded the Nordoff Robbins charity, initially to help vulnerable children. It now delivers more than 50,000 sessions a year across the UK to people of all ages with challenges including depression, dementia, autism and trauma, helping them physically and emotionally through a combination of playing, listening and conversation.

As Campbell gained confidence he began to jam again with his old pals. They formed the Ian Campbell Single Handed Blues Band (iancampbellblues.com) and, this year, Campbell decided he was good enough to perform again. This Halloween he will play at the annual gig he missed four years ago. It won’t be his first. 10 days ago, the band played at a small music festival in Reading. McHale was in the crowd. As he began to play, Campbell’s pre-gig nerves, something he had not felt before, quickly vanished.

«There was a moment during a Van Morrison number called «Gloria» when I did a solo in the middle and realised it sounded as good as it used to,» he says on the phone. «I was in another world. I had this amazing feeling of total control and relaxation. I felt like I was in charge of my identity again.»

To find out more about music therapy or donate, go to nordoff-robbins.org.uk

Source Article from http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/features/how-music-cured-the-blues-8784923.html

One Direction and Justin Timberlake win at MTV Video Music Awards 2013 – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | lunes 26 agosto 2013 5:21 pm

Last night the group also presented the Best Pop Video award to Justin
Timberlake. The 32-year-old’s video for Mirrors beat Robin Thicke’s Blurred
Lines and Taylor Swift’s I Knew You Were Trouble to the award. Timberlake,
who now has 11 MTV VMA awards to his name, was honoured with the Michael
Jackson Video Vanguard Award – the equivalent of a lifetime achievement
award.

After being presented with the award by comedian Jimmy Fallon, Timberlake
said: «I don’t deserve this award. But I’m not going to give it back.»

His videos also won the awards for Best Direction (for Suit and Tie) and Best
Editing (for Mirrors), and reunited with the other members of his former boy
band N-Sync to perform live at the ceremony.

Other live performers included Lady Gaga, Miley Cyrus and Katy Perry.

US hip hop duo Macklemore & Ryan Lewis won the Best Video with a Social
Message award for Same Love, a song which supports gay rights and condemns
homophobia in rap culture.

Full winners list for the MTV Video Music Awards 2013:

Video of the Year
Justin Timberlake, Mirrors

Best Hip-Hop Video
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis feat. Ray Dalton, Can’t Hold Us

Best Male Video
Bruno Mars, Locked Out of Heaven

Best Female Video
Taylor Swift, I Knew You Were Trouble

Best Pop Video
Selena Gomez, Come & Get It

Artist to Watch
Austin Mahone, What About Love

Best Collaboration
P!nk feat. Nate Ruess, Just Give Me a Reason

Best Video with a Social Message
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis feat. Mary Lewis, Same Love

Best Rock Video
Thirty Seconds to Mars, Up in the Air

Best Art Direction
Janelle Monae feat. Erykah Badu, Q.U.E.E.N

Best Choreography
Bruno Mars, Treasure

Best Cinematography
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis feat. Ray Dalton, Can’t Hold Us

Best Direction
Justin Timberlake feat. Jay-Z, Suit & Tie

Best Editing
Justin Timberlake, Mirrors

Best Visual Effects
Capital Cities, Safe and Sound

Song of the Summer
One Direction, Best Song Ever

Michael Jackson Video Vanguard Award
Justin Timberlake

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/music-news/10266366/One-Direction-and-Justin-Timberlake-win-at-MTV-Video-Music-Awards-2013.html

The 95-year-old keeping traditional Vietnamese music alive – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | sábado 24 agosto 2013 4:54 am







Vinh Bao

Vietnam’s Music of the Amateurs has been likened to Western Chamber music. Fans of the traditional Asian art form describe its beauty and subtlety – attributes which Justin Rowlatt found difficult to appreciate, until he met its leading exponent.

It is quite rare to get an audience with Vinh Bao.

The 95-year-old is reckoned to be one of the greatest of the country’s traditional musicians and the guardian of a form of Vietnamese music called Nhac Tai Tu Nam Bo – or the Music of the Amateurs.

He is not so mobile now, so it is his daughter who meets me at the door of his small house in a back street of Ho Chi Minh City. She leads me up to his tiny music room on the first floor.

The maestro is sitting on the floor. He is a small, slight man with a sweeping mane of white hair and a mischievous sparkle in his eyes. It quickly becomes clear he has not lost any of his sharpness or wit.


From Our Own Correspondent



Instruments in a shop in Hanoi



  • Insight and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world
  • Broadcast on Radio 4 and BBC World Service

He gestures to a strange instrument beside him and offers to play. I am surprised to detect the hint of a challenge.

He has told me this is his favourite instrument, the dan tranh, or Vietnamese zither. It is certainly a beautiful thing. The zither is made of polished blonde wood. It is about a metre long and 15cm wide. The surface is convex and it has 17 strings, each supported by two wooden bridges.

The old man bends over the instrument and begins to pluck with one hand while the other presses and bends the strings. His hands move surprisingly swiftly and precisely. But the result is not what I expect.

I hear an almost random cascade of sound. There is little rhythm and many of the notes sound – to my ear at least – distinctly out of tune. As he finishes I nod uncomfortably and try to smile appreciatively. I think he realises I have found the music difficult.



















Vinh Bao

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.












«You have to forget the idea of absolute pitch,» he explains. He tells me Vietnamese musicians tune the instruments as they see fit or according to the vocal range of singers who accompany them.

Vietnamese music is a product of the tonal nature of the Vietnamese language. A word with a high rising tone cannot be sung with a falling melody, and vice versa. So melodic forms have developed that allow improvised changes of notes to fit the tones of the words used.

He says that is why there is such an emphasis on what he calls «ornamentation», on bending and embellishing the note – another reason traditional music often appears «out of tune» to the Western ear.


Music of the amateurs




This type of music is «a highly bourgeois evolved art form… whose beauty lies in an extremely subtle and melodic style.

«Although comparable to Western Chamber music, [it] is of a strictly private nature to be heard by a small audience and practiced by professional or semi-professional people as hobby for their own enjoyment.»

From Introduction to Vietnamese music, by Nguyen Vinh Bao.



«That is why it has been so difficult to keep the Nhac Tai Tu Nam Bo form alive,» he says, clearly frustrated. «The West displays to the Vietnamese young people its flawless instruments, its accurate notation, its varied repertoire, its orchestration, and its disciplined orchestras,» says Vinh Bao.

«It is hard to get them interested in old-fashioned instruments,» he tells me, sweeping a hand towards the collection that adorns the walls of the small room.

There are examples of dan nguyet, the «two-stringed moon-shaped lute»; the dan bau – a one-stringed instrument which has a buffalo-horn rod to bend the notes like a Hawaiian guitar; and the dan gao, the «coconut viola».

«Young people have tended to see Vietnamese music as a clumsy old lady, as old-fashioned,» he sighs. But he warns darkly: «A nation that loses its culture will number its days before losing its entire nation.»

Given his age and what he has said I am anxious when I ask him about the future. But to my surprise he breaks into a big smile and gestures towards a computer on the table behind him. I notice an expensive digital recording device beside it.

«I have more students than ever,» he says with obvious pride. «I have got pupils all over the world.» It seems Vinh Bao has been learning how to recruit the latest technology in his battle to preserve Vietnam’s musical legacy.

He says he has recorded many of the classic Nhac Tai Tu Nam Bo melodies and, as well as teaching people in person, he now gives lessons over Skype. In fact, he says, our interview has overrun and he is due to give a lesson right now. I accept his offer to stay and watch.


Vinh Bao playing the Vietnamese zither

The nonagenarian is as deft with a computer keyboard as with a coconut viola. A few moments later he is chatting with a Vietnamese-American woman in Texas and the zither lesson has begun.

My translator had told me Vinh Bao’s music is so delicate and mournful it moves her to tears – so now I understand it a bit better I am keen to give it a second chance. Vinh Bao bends over his instrument and plays once again.

This time I think I discern a purpose among what had seemed a jumble of random sounds. The music may be challenging but the way this old man has harnessed modern technology to preserve the tradition he loves is truly impressive.

How to listen to From Our Own Correspondent:

BBC Radio 4: Saturdays at 11:30 and some Thursdays at 11:00

Listen online or download the podcast.

BBC World Service: Short editions Monday-Friday – see World Service programme schedule.

You can follow the Magazine on Twitter and on Facebook

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23795983

The sound of summer: Independent writers remember their backseat tunes – The Independent

Posted by Google News | Industry News | sábado 24 agosto 2013 4:54 am

Dad’s mix tape, various artists

For most of our lives my sister and I have played the same game in the back seat of our parents’ car. It’s rare now that we four find ourselves travelling together but when we do, it is as if the past twentysomething years have never happened. My mother will dole out provisions from the World of Mints (her name) in the door compartment – soft mints, butter mints, humbugs; your mint smorgasbord. And my father will put on his driving mix tape. Polly and I will wait for his favourite song – «Only a Dream in Rio» by James Taylor – to come on and we will hold our breath and place whispered bets on whether he will do his finger-pointing dance on the set of six descending notes that comes four minutes in. There is no need to place bets. He does it every single time.

This is still the song I think of when I think of going on holiday – the soundtrack of the two-hour drive up to the Lake District every summer, of tours around Oregon and tailbacks in the Cotswolds. We listened to albums, too. Graceland, of course. We wore out the ribbon on a Best of The Kinks cassette from the bargain bin at Woolworths.

It was the mix tape, though, that made journeys speed by – so gloriously odd you could never tire of it. You might think that Toto’s «Africa», The Pretenders and Monteverdi’s Beatus Vir is an odd mix. That Steeleye Span, «Baker Street», a Palestrina mass and Randy Newman should never be heard in the same room, let alone on the same A-side. But you have probably never met Peter Jones. That tape was travel magic – the becalming tones of Don McLean’s «Starry Starry Night» and John Lennon’s «Jealous Guy», an ADHD swerve into a choral requiem, building up to the 1971 version of «Without You» by Harry Nilsson. If there is a better musical moment for releasing the tension of a Sunday-night traffic jam on the M6 than the falsetto key change on «I can’t liiiive», I have yet to find it.

When I first went to university, a new friend who knew a lot about music, or at least wore his DJ cans at all times, flipped through my CDs. «It must be so great,» he said with a sneer, «to have absolutely no taste in music.» At the time I was crushed, now I’m proud. I have inherited my father’s eclectic taste and capacity to listen to eight musical styles in as many minutes. As I get older, I realise that his driving anthems are the songs I love the most. One day I hope I’ll pass them on to my own children – wrong lyrics and all.

Rhodri Marsden

Rock Follies, The Little Ladies

Back in 1977, the Marsdens’ holiday sounds were supplied by a small mono cassette player balanced on the ridge between the driver and passenger seats.

Two records were played on that machine more than any other, and I associate them so closely with back-seat motorway travel that when I hear them now I can almost taste the travel-sickness tablets. Now largely forgotten, they were released under the name Rock Follies, which was also the title of the Bafta-winning TV series the songs came from. I was never allowed to see it but the lyrics are embedded in my brain like times tables.

The show was about a three-piece female rock band called The Little Ladies who were trying to make it in a business dominated by exploitative managers and promoters. By all accounts it was ahead of its time, not only in its use of original music (written by Roxy Music’s Andy Mackay) but also its portrayal of the abuse of male power, with lyrical references to sex, drug-taking and anti-royalism. Unaware of the dark undercurrent of the songs, I’d sing along loudly in the car.

«The gramophone producers, the golden disc seducers,» my six-year-old self trilled. «The managers and bankers, the publishers and wankers.» Not as jolly as «we’re all going on a summer holiday», sure, but definitely more educational.

Holly Williams

Abbey Road, The Beatles

I remember sticking on my parents’ grubby tape of Abbey Road one afternoon as a teenager and having an extended déjà vu – 47 minutes, 23 seconds long, to be precise. Every song seemed to twang a chord of childhood. It was slightly eerie.

Abbey Road was a staple of many car journeys when I was little. My parents were big Beatles fans, and we listened to the full back catalogue in the car, but my brother and I had our favourites: his was Let It Be, mine Abbey Road. Driving to the coast of Pembrokeshire or North Wales for camping or caravanning holidays, we’d sing along on the back seat.

The Beatles’ 11th album is a natural one for a kid to like – «Maxwell’s Silver Hammer» and «Octopus’s Garden» are, essentially, children’s songs. My best friend Carys shared my love of the latter enough that we actually fabricated an underwater set and sea-life costumes, and performed a play based on it at school. With a dance, and everything.

Now I have the CD – and MP3 – of Abbey Road, and can skip Ringo’s novelty abomination. But it remains my favourite Beatles album. I’ve half-emptied dance floors at parties by insisting we listen to the whole of the side-two medley, cite it as evidence of George Harrison’s genius, and have ended many a compilation CD with «The End» (try it – it’s perfect). My dad, of course, is delighted.

Tim Walker

No Jacket Required, Phil Collins

Of course it begins with drums: dum-thwack. Dum-thwack. Duhdum-thwack, dum-dum-thwack. Then comes synth brass, synth bass, synth keys, synth guitars. Finally, Phil Collins’s voice: «Su-Sussudio, Oh-oh!».

«Sussudio» and the nine songs that followed will forever be the sound of the A303, the road that carries Home Counties holidaymakers to the West Country, past Stonehenge and at least five Little Chefs. For several summers in the 1980s and 1990s, it was the route my family took to Dorset, Devon or Cornwall. The soundtrack for such journeys was most often No Jacket Required.

Collins’s biggest-selling LP is a quintessential artefact of its decade: a Grammy winner in 1986, tracks were used in Miami Vice, it was praised in American Psycho. Side one ends with an extended sax solo. Collins performed «Doesn’t Anybody Stay Together Anymore» at a birthday party for Prince Charles, months before he split from Princess Diana.

Many tracks reward my nostalgia. «Only You Know and I Know» has a key change at 1:59 that still makes me want to punch the air when I listen to it 25 years later.

The album ends with a slow one, «Take Me Home»: appropriate, since it was often the last song we listened to pulling into our driveway, my brother and I half-asleep in the back, Phil’s clattering drums fading to nothing.

Chloë Hamilton

Automatic for the People, REM

As a family undeterred by poor weather, our summer holidays consisted of old tents, soggy dogs and lots of walking. Often, my twin sister and I were roused at 5am, crammed into a car with sleeping bags, waterproofs and sensible shoes, and driven to some rainy part of Britain, on the promise of a mid-morning stop at a Little Chef.

REM’s 1992 album Automatic for the People was our soundtrack. I remember drifting in and out of sleep to Michael Stipe’s mumbling melodies, furiously agreeing with the lyrics to «Everybody Hurts» whenever I felt hard done by («No Chloë, you can’t have any more sweets…») and deliberating over whether I’d be allowed to go «night swimming» at a nearby lido.

Despite the album’s gloomy themes, it brings back fond memories. When I catch a chorus of it now I’m transported to those long, drizzly car journeys, next to my sister, two wet dogs stretched out across our laps, juice cartons and apple cores perched precariously, gazing out of windows decorated with doggy nose prints.

Never one to pander to our childish requests («But I REALLY want to listen to the Spice Girls») I suspect my mum relished being the family’s designated DJ, for once able to dictate what our young ears heard.

Larry Ryan

The Jazz Singer, Neil Diamond

The 1980 remake of The Jazz Singer, a vehicle for soft-rock superstar Neil Diamond, is an unremarkable film. Critic Roger Ebert described his performance as «offensively narcissistic». However, Diamond’s soundtrack was another matter and this is where my family comes in. Some have madeleine cakes, some snow sleds, my family had Diamond taking it to the mid-tempo bridge on «Coming to America», the soundtrack’s barnstorming opening salvo, a tale of immigrants travelling far in search of the American dream and all that jazz.

Our journey was more mundane. Each summer in the late Eighties and early Nineties, my parents, my three siblings and I would pack into my dad’s car, crank up The Jazz Singer and drive from Dublin to rural Tipperary to stay at my uncle’s farm.

In later years the tape deck was swapped for a CD changer and Diamond got left behind. A dark period in my teens followed when my dad installed a Celine Dion CD in his car. It killed me, one shriek at a time.

But The Jazz Singer stayed with us, a familiar, familial touchstone. Some time later when Diamond came to Dublin for an arena gig we joked that we should book six seats arranged in car formation. It’s an idea Ticketmaster could take up: the «family car nostalgia ticket bundle».

Gillian Orr

Hello Children Everywhere, various artists

When I was younger most holidays were spent in Perth, visiting my Australian mother’s family. My brothers and I loved it there.

My father had left his native Ulster many years before, but still wanted us to see Ireland. To our young minds it was uninspiring compared to the Technicolor riches of Down Under. We were underwhelmed when, one summer when I was eight, it was proposed that we would drive to Kinsale in west Cork.

For the 12-hour trip from our home in Berkshire, my parents turned to the tape deck for entertainment. Dad had brought a double cassette called Hello Children Everywhere, a compilation of old standards and nursery rhymes taken from a 1950s BBC radio programme.

We sang along to everything from «Home on the Range» by Gene Autry to «(How Much Is) That Doggy in the Window»; Doris Day’s «Black Hills of Dakota» to «You’re a Pink Toothbrush». Along with bickering, it became the musical backdrop to our little Irish trip.

Before writing this, I reminded my father of the tape. He phoned later to tell me that he’d found the dusty copy and had played the tape. «Music is the shorthand of emotion,» Leo Tolstoy said. He must have been right. Otherwise how else could you explain an old man, sitting alone in his kitchen, getting misty-eyed to «The Runaway Train»?

Tell us your tape @indymagazine

Source Article from http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/features/the-sound-of-summer-independent-writers-remember-their-backseat-tunes-8779059.html

Designer headphones The sound of music – The Economist

Posted by Google News | Industry News | viernes 23 agosto 2013 11:52 pm

The man with the plan for flash cans

FOR decades the market for expensive headphones was mainly limited to hi-fi buffs. But now that the boxy stereo system in the corner of the bedroom is largely a thing of the past, and young music fans listen mostly on portable devices, headphones have become as much of a fashion statement as the music player itself. Among the first to spot the potential of this market was Dr Dre, an American rapper-cum-tycoon. In 2008 he and Jimmy Iovine, a record producer, launched their Beats range of headphones, to great success. They have all but created a new product category: premium-priced ($100-plus) cans whose sound quality is good enough, but which mainly sell on their brand image.

Beats Electronics and its founders have proved adept at using celebrity endorsements and product placement to plug their headphones. In America the company now has almost half the market for premium-priced cans, compared with 21% for Bose, a longer-established maker. Beats headphones are bassy: that’s what hip-hop fans want, but might not suit opera lovers. Overall, though, they are a lot better than the earbuds that come free with most portable devices.

There is in any case a limit to how good music will sound through even the best headphones. Most of the music tracks on portable music players are in the form of mp3 audio files, in which the music has been compressed to make the files smaller and thus fit more of them into a given amount of storage capacity. Jim Anderson, a sound engineer who teaches at New York University, first plays his students an mp3 music file through good speakers, and then an uncompressed master recording of the same song: they are amazed at how much they have been missing, he says.

Since consumers have been persuaded, largely by Beats, that it is worth paying a fair whack for some half-decent headphones that look nice, perhaps they could be persuaded—especially since the storage capacity of many portable devices is now huge—to turn their backs on cheap mp3s and seek out recordings in true high fidelity. Linn Records, an online distributor of high-resolution music files, sold around 60,000 songs between April and June of this year, most of them in the FLAC format, which compresses the music lightly, saving a bit of storage space, without any loss of quality. Apple’s iTunes has a similar, though slightly lower-quality offering.

If sales of these hi-fi recordings take off it may boost the market for really top-notch cans like those of Grado Labs, another American firm. Grado has for decades relied on reviews in specialist magazines, and word-of-mouth recommendations from fans, to spread news of its headphones’ faithful reproduction. In contrast to Beats, it has eschewed image-making: it has not advertised since 1964. Unlike Dr Dre, then, its fortunes are less tied to the fickle tastes and fast-changing fashions of the young.

Source Article from http://www.economist.com/news/business/21584046-dr-dres-creation-market-costly-cans-may-herald-return-true-hi-fi-sound

National Maritime Museum has now used X-ray scans to help fix musical toy – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | viernes 23 agosto 2013 1:42 pm
  • The toy belonged to Edith Rosenbaum, an American fashion journalist
  • National Maritime Museum has
    now used X-ray scans to help fix musical toy
  • A recording has been made in the hope that public can identify the tune

By
Ellie Zolfagharifard

12:10 GMT, 22 August 2013


|

18:35 GMT, 22 August 2013

An eerie song that helped children on a Titanic lifeboat block out the cries of the dying can be heard once again.

The song came from a musical toy pig that belonged to Edith Rosenbaum, an American fashion journalist, who was 32 at the time of the tragedy.

Rosenbaum and her pig survived the sinking in April 1912, but unfortunately the mechanism that played the music didn’t.

Now the National Maritime Museum has fixed the musical toy and made a recording of the song
101 years after the event. 

Scroll down for video

Toy pig belonging to Edith Russell

The musical pig belonged to Edith Rosenbaum, an American fashion journalist, who was 32 at the time of the tragedy. Rosenbaum and her pig survived the sinking in April 1912

‘It was one of those goosebump moments,’ Rory McEvoy, a curator at the museum, told MailOnline about the tune.

‘We never expected it would have been possible. It was tremendously exciting and eerie at the same time.’

Researchers only played the song a few times to prevent further damage to the toy, and made the recording in the hope that the public could identify the tune.

In a 1970 interview, Ms Rosenbaum described how she refused to evacuate the Titanic at first, and it was her musical pig that saved her.

‘I never would have left the ship,’ 
she said, ‘but a sailor came along and he said: “say you;  you don’t want
to be saved, well I’ll save your baby” and he grabbed this pig from
under my arm and he tossed it in the lifeboat.’

Ms
Rosenbaum followed the pig into the lifeboat and, during the seven
hours before being rescued, comforted children on board with the tune.

Teresa Thorne who plays the part of Edith in A Night to Remember

Teresa Thorne (right) who plays the part of Edith Russell (left), owner of the lucky pig, in the 1958 film ‘A Night to Remember’

Iconic: A 15-year-old Elliot Brown took this picture of the Titanic as it left Southampton on its first and only voyage

During the seven hours before being rescued from the Titanic (pictured), Miss Rosenbaum and her musical pig comforted children onboard a nearby lifeboat

As the pig could not be opened without causing irreparable damage, the team at the National Maritime Museum used high resolution X-ray equipment to examine the internal components.

The toy was scanned twice; the first to pick out the details of the main body and a second to obtain good images of the musical movement.

They found that pig’s body was constructed from organic material, wood and papier maché.

Mr McEvoy explained that to scan the movement, the lower energy radiation had to be filtered out by placing a small copper sheet in the path of the X-rays before they met the object.

Titanic pig

The rendered dissection showing the inner surface of the carcass. The pig’s body was constructed from organic material, wood and papier maché

The scan revealed the tail was a knotted piece of vellum that was never connected to the music box. 

Initially, the team thought the music was spring-driven and activated by pulling the tail. But the scans showed it was actually a hand-powered type of movement.

‘By slicing across the width of the model the cause of a rattling noise was identified as a hairpin, probably used in attempt to reconnect to the music box after the crank had broken away,’ said Mr McEvoy, in his blog.

‘The S-shaped object in the centre appears to be the original crank-handle and tail. 

‘Detailed examination of this object shows it to be a skin-covered metal tube, which is an unexpected and very exciting find, perhaps a case for key-hole surgery,’ added Mr McEvoy.

Titanic pig

As the pig could not be opened without causing irreparable damage, the team at the National Maritime Museum used high resolution X-ray equipment to examine the internal components

The second scan showed a toothed wheel attached to the pin barrel, which was driven by a worm gear on the end of the crank shaft. 

The comb was marked with a distinctive star logo, which the team are now hoping will help them identify the maker.

‘What has been shown here is only the beginning of the study; these 3-D models provide invaluable information that will assist with our curatorial questions as well as the long-term care and conservation of these extraordinary objects,’ said Mr McEvoy.

The pig came to the Museum as part of the Lord-MacQuitty collection in 2003.
 

The comments below have not been moderated.

I believe the original tune may have come from another source, but the version my mother used to sing when I was a child was a chewing gum song! «Chew, Chew, chew, chew, chew chewing gum
How I love chewing gum.»
@mortoglina

mortoglina
,

Minneapolis, United States,
23/8/2013 13:58

A musical pig? I never realised Myleene Klass was 101 years old!

professor_plum
,

ukville,
23/8/2013 10:56

Another depressing artifact from a depressing era. This garbage doesn’t interest me.
– novasigma, UK, United Kingdom, 22/8/2013 17:38 – Then why read the bl@@dy article if it doesn’t interest you!

Laura74
,

Durban,
23/8/2013 09:14

Somedy found the title : it calls «La Matchiche» which was a french song sung in 1905 by Felix Mayol. It was a great success in France but surely all around Europe. I hope this information will be transmitted.

Frederic Peressoni
,

ONNAING, France,
23/8/2013 07:53

» My mother gave me a nickle to buy a pickle.I didn`t buy a pickle,i bought some chewing gum » I KNOW that these are some of the words,but I don`t know the name of the song………My dad sang me this song a long time ago.i think that it might be called the «Pickle song» ????

William Agranoff
,

salem, United States,
23/8/2013 04:52

Look up «THE LONDON NOVELTY ORCH – LA MAXIXE» on YouTube

John Wilton
,

Iselin, United States,
23/8/2013 04:39

Tarama Salata, thanks for clarifying the Gershwin connection. I couldn’t identify the rest and was sorely puzzled by the passage of a tune from «An American in Paris» written decades after the Titanic sank.

Nancy R
,

Marietta Georgia USA,
23/8/2013 04:14

Hey Tamara Salata – My friend Suzy Kakia is having a Titanic party in Santorini next week…why don’t you come!

Lou Koumadis
,

Kouzina, Greece,
23/8/2013 04:06

Why was a grown woman carring around a stuffed pig? Why did the shipmate think it was a baby and if he truly did why did he toss it into the lifeboat? This story is just a little odd…..

Vic
,

Seattle, United States,
23/8/2013 03:06

Edith Rosenbaum Russell had an absolutely fascinating life-google her name-her life would make a great movie.

jaxmom
,

Albuquerque,
23/8/2013 02:54

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2399843/Hear-song-played-Titanic-sunk-Music-toy-pig-recorded-repair.html

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