Glasgow: city of sport and music – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | jueves 29 agosto 2013 3:58 pm

The smartest distinction between Glasgow and the Scottish capital I’ve come
across is from the Orcadian writer Edwin Muir, who in 1935 observed how
“every Edinburgh man considers himself a little better than his neighbour,
and every Glasgow man just as good as his neighbour”. In truth, there is an
exciting synergy between the cities. Over the last few weeks Glaswegians
have been popping over to Edinburgh for its Festivals while Edinburghians
have travelled west for a bevy of events including the World Pipe Band
Championships and the new, annual Summer Sessions pop concerts recently
launched in Bellahouston Park, which drew rain-defying crowds of up to
30,000 to see superstars like Eminem and Kings of Leon. “You’re the best
audience of our tour!” yelled Caleb Followill, lead singer of the latter,
paying tribute to Glasgow’s reputation for having some of the most
passionate and receptive music fans in the country. And that’s not just down
to mass inebriation.

The SSE Hydro is Glasgow’s answer to the O2 and will host both concerts and
sporting events at the 2014 Commonwealth Games

These days the biggest draw in Glasgow isn’t Charles Rennie Mackintosh, or,
thankfully, deep-fried Mars Bars. It’s the musical life – as befits its
status as one of only five places around the world to be declared a City of
Music by Unesco. Nearly half of its visitors are under 35, and every week
some 130 musical events take place. And while its dishevelled streets have
given us many famous performers from Lulu to Franz Ferdinand, it’s by no
means all rock ‘n’ roll. Every January the Celtic Connections festival
attracts over 100,000 Celtic music-lovers, while one of the most appealing
events in the build-up to the Games will be a nationwide “Big Big Sing”
featuring massed singing events and an online Commonwealth choir.

You can learn a lot more about this heritage by downloading the entertaining
audio tours created by Walking Heads, which guide visitors to myriad points
of musical interest in the city centre to a backing track of
locally-inspired sounds. Here is the low-down on how Oasis were discovered
at the 300-capacity King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut twenty years ago. There is the
1857 Panopticon, the world’s oldest surviving music hall where Stan Laurel
made his debut.

“Whatever happened to the Barrowlands?” Debbie Harry asked last July when
Blondie played the Clyde Auditorium, a somewhat sterile conference venue
next door to The Pie that is better known as The Armadillo. Nothing, is the
answer. Properly called Barrowland (most people add a s, as if it was some
kind of dream state), this run-down ballroom opened in 1960 and is still
going strong with acts like Paul Weller and Manic Street Preachers appearing
in the next few months. With a wood sprung dance floor, monumental oak
pillars and room for 1,900 people, it’s a legendary engine of memories – you
don’t have to go far to find someone whose parents or grandparents met
there.

A new book, Barrowland: A Glasgow Experience, will be published next month
chronicling its lively past, and a tour of its seen-it-all corners will be a
highlight of this month’s Doors Open Day programme, when heritage buildings
across the city are opened to visitors. Fittingly, its huge, shooting
star-spattered neon sign (erected in 1985 to bring a touch of Vegas to
Glasgow’s beleaguered East End) inspired the logo for the Cultural Programme
that will be part of the build-up to the Commonwealth Games.

“Definitely Bowie in July ‘79” says its manager, Tom Joyes, when I ask about
the most memorable performance he’s seen in over 20 years of service.
Touring Barrowland’s unashamedly dated halls and dressing rooms, with their
authentic 1960s lino, it’s telling how both bands and fans still adore this
great, sweaty, beery love-barn.

Will the Scots warm in the same way to a massive new, state of the art
people-processing machine like the SSE Hydro? Will The Pie be spoken of with
as much fondness as the city’s many cherished small venues, from the
DJ-filled caverns of The Arches beneath Central Station to the on-trend
performances and after-parties held at the SWG3 warehouse in the West End?
I’m not sure, but one thing is clear – if you do go to Glasgow for the
sport, get ready to have a dance too.

GLASGOW BASICS

THE BEST HOTELS

£

CitizenM Glasgow

A zestful, newbuild high-rise in the city centre with an arty lounge, cheery
staff and 198 cabin-style rooms with king-size beds and Frette linen (0203
519 1111; citizenm.com,
doubles from £59 including wifi and free movies).

££

Hotel Indigo Glasgow

Set in a former power station near Central Station, with 94 contemporary rooms
plus high ceilings, funky wallpapers and a handsome bar (0141 226 7700; hotelindigoglasgow.com,
from £99 including wifi and non-alcoholic minibar).

£££

Blythswood Square

The former HQ of the Royal Scottish Automobile Club is now a vivacious,
100-room town house hotel with five-star service, top-notch cocktails and a
spa (0141 248 8888; blythswoodsquare.com,
from £200 with breakfast).

THE BEST RESTAURANTS

£

Mother India’s Cafe

A clean-cut Indian restaurant opposite Kelvingrove Art Gallery that serves
spicy and substantial tapas dishes at £4-£5 each (1355 Argyle St; 0141 339
9145; motherindia.co.uk).

££

Crabshakk

A small and often packed modern restaurant devoted to Scottish fish and
seafood, offering everything from a “wee supper” of fish and chips (£7.95)
to a platter of fruits-de-mer for £70 (1114 Argyle St; 0141 334 6127; crabshakk.com).

£££

Ubiquitous Chip

This plant-filled, multi-level West End restaurant opened in 1971 but it’s not
dated: the cuisine is so inventive and engaging (without being silly) it
deserves a Michelin star (12 Ashton Lane; 0141 334 5007; ubiquitouschip.co.uk).

INFORMATION

For tickets and information on the Commonwealth Games (July 23-August 3 2014)
see glasgow2014.com. To
book an introductory track cycling session at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome
see emiratesarena.co.uk.
For other sports visit the Going For Gold section at peoplemakeglasgow.com.

The SSE Hydro (thehydro.com)
opens September 30. Other recommended musical venues include Barrowland (glasgow-barrowland.com),
King Tut’s (kingtuts.co.uk),
The Arches (thearches.co.uk)
and SWG3 (swg3.tv). Download
Glasgow music tours at walkingheads.net.
Tickets for the 2014 Summer Sessions (glasgowsummersessions.com)
go on sale next April.

Barrowland: A Glasgow Experience (Mainstream, £12.99) is published on
September 12. Doors Open Day runs from September 16-22 (0141 554 4411; glasgowdoorsopenday.com)

Glasgow Visitor Information Centre (0141 204 4400; peoplemakeglasgow.com).

Read more

Previous
Telegraph Travel articles on Glasgow

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/uk/scotland/10268224/Glasgow-city-of-sport-and-music.html

Darkside: Tom Stoppard’s play was as pretentious as Pink Floyd’s music, review – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 28 agosto 2013 2:53 pm

These days when I hear Kenton’s Artistry in Rhythm I flinch, but
affectionately. The music we respond to in adolescence always keeps a
special place in our affections. Pink Floyd’s rock epic, dazzling guitar
solos, depth of sound, sonorous lyrics went to the heart of several
post-austerity generations and stayed there. I still can’t understand what
they hear in it. What remains magic to those who kept the album in the
charts from 1973 to 1998 sounds plain pretentious to me.

In this respect Stoppard’s play matched it, juggling philosophical paradoxes,
film references, sharp jokes about money making, slushy environmental
pieties. Its characters tickled the ear but never crossed the emotional
threshold. Thanks for the trip but I’m following Emily back into the
madhouse at the end, even with Bill Nighy as my doctor.

Pre-publicity for Darkside has filled BBC airwaves everywhere, from Mark
Lawson on Front Row to the Today programme, with nary a word of reservation,
I feel inadequate for not appreciating it more. Hoping for enlightenment on
Monday night I followed a link on the BBC website to an online Pink Floyd
mega-marketplace for tickets, T-shirts, memorabilia galore. There was even a
special offer. If I’d bought two of the world tour T-shirts by 8.00am
yesterday I’d have got a free hat. Just the thing for visiting Emily in the
asylum, I thought, but maybe the commemorative Stash Tin, a snip at £5.50,
would be more appropriate.

Seriously, I now realise that the forthcoming Pink Floyd world tour is a
milestone in rock history. For years it seemed impossible that David Gilmour
and Roger Waters would ever reconcile their differences and play together
again. But time passes, angers fade, two of the original members (Syd
Barrett and Rick Wright) are dead and the lyric of Time (the one Jeremy
Clarkson recommends learning by heart) makes fresh sense to band and fans
alike. Not to me, alas, but there’s room for all on the airwaves and, praise
be, still 10 more days of the Proms ahead.

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/10269343/Darkside-Tom-Stoppards-play-was-as-pretentious-as-Pink-Floyds-music-review.html

Talk Talk: ‘You should never listen to music as background music’ – a classic … – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 28 agosto 2013 2:53 pm

«No,» says Mark Hollis stubbornly, he will not look directly into the camera as this, apparently, is compromise tantamount to soul-selling.

«No,» he says, he doesn’t see why he should have to explain his music to anyone. It speaks, he reasons – dusting down the superannuated cliché – for itself.

«No,» he explains, he will not read this article. He’s been stitched up in the press so many times before, it will probably happen again.

The trouble is that Mark Hollis and his band, Talk Talk, have just released their fourth LP, Spirit of Eden, and there are promotional duties to reluctantly perform. Had Spirit of Eden been an unremarkable pop record, none of this would have been necessary. However, this is not the case. For Spirit of Eden is a quite remarkable, possibly even significant work that makes their powerfully dense and emotional 1986 set, The Colour of Spring, sound not unlike a Rubettes demo.

It is the fourth stage in Talk Talk’s intriguing metamorphosis from the quirky singles band who appeared at a time when Duran Duran were considered the ultimate role model, to a collective of almost painfully intense musicians who are much given to name-checking Satie, Bartók («a great geezer») and Debussy.

Mark Hollis, in what occasionally seems to be a strained attempt to appear enigmatic, is keen to dismiss his past, his flunked university degree in child psychology, his five years of fruitless toil with punk band the Reaction, even the «diabolical» treatment of Talk Talk when they first hopped aboard the pop carousel in 1982.

Hollis’s co-writer and producer, Tim Friese-Greene, is similarly reticent to reminisce. «As far as I’m concerned,» he says, «this began in 1984 with It’s My Life and nothing else is particularly relevant.»

Both Hollis and Friese-Greene will happily discuss «vibe», «feel», and how they achieved Spirit of Eden’s brittle and brooding atmospheres, harsh dynamic extremes and constant mesmeric pulse. But amid heavy-shouldered shrugs and staunchly monosyllabic pleas of ignorance, neither seems vaguely interested as to who will buy the record, how it will be made available or the effect it will have. They leave this to Tony Wadsworth, Capitol and Parlophone Records’ general manager who is responsible for the marketing of among others Queen, Pet Shop Boys and Morrissey.

«Talk Talk are not your ordinary combo and require sympathetic marketing,» Wadsworth explains diplomatically. «They’re not so much difficult as not obvious. You’ve just got to find as many ways as possible to expose the music. The standard marketing route is whack out a single, try to chart the single, and then hopefully on the strength of that, sell some albums. With the way the media is angled, the room you’ve got to expose adult music – for want of a better term – is very restricted. We’ve got to do what I believe to be a very heavy campaign on Talk Talk. We’ve got to go out very bullishly and tell people that this is an album for 1988. That will be the sales pitch – An Album for 1988.»

Similarly, Spirit Of Eden could be An Album for 1972. It boasts just six songs, three of which seamlessly comprise one side of the LP. No one track appears to exceed 15 beats per minute. The instrumentation is predominantly acoustic, and Hollis’s anguished Steve Winwood-registered voice seldom rises above a whisper. The lyrics abstractly embrace such thigh-slapping subject matter as moral decline, drug addiction and that perennial party-starter, death. Commercially, it is hard to envisage the album as «a goer».

«When I heard it first in its finished form,» says Wadsworth, «I thought, ‘Mmm, this is interesting,’ then got into it very quickly. Technology aside, it could have been made 20 years ago. I see it as even earlier than that. It’s like a cross between classical music and jazz with a modern perspective. I don’t see it as directly related to acid house but I see the phenomenon as having the same sorts of roots. There’s common interests. They’re both free-form with an insistent rhythm. I think it’ll be well received. People are looking something a little more open-minded.»

«Pace is of the essence,» says Friese-Greene of the album’s refusal to break into a brisk stroll, «even if it is a pace that approaches vanishing point at times. The more relaxed the pace, the more importance everything that happens assumes. You have to be careful and not overstep the line from being relaxed to being tedious and I think we’ve kept on the right side of that.»

«The dynamics are a little bit hard to take at first,» he continues. «There were times during the mixing when I thought, ‘I’m not sure about this,’ but it scrapes through. Again it had to strike the right note between intensity and irritation. But we’re not being naive about it. Some people could definitely be put off by the pace of it or the level of intensity and if people are uncomfortable with that maybe, with respect, they should listen to something else.»

Talk Talk’s image has, throughout their six-year career, moved nonchalantly between the poor and the non-existent. Despite having been «styled» upon their signing to EMI («We were under terrible pressure,» says Hollis. «It’s a very ugly thing. Things went down that I was very unhappy with. It was ridiculous. Disgusting. But I don’t regret it; they just made me more adamant never to get caught like that again»), the band soon went their own sartorial way, growing unkempt normal-to-greasy hair, wearing clothes that could only have been bought with a War on Want charge-card and sporting footwear which invited the expression «hush puppies».

«The image,» laughs Tony Wadsworth, «or lack of it, doesn’t bother you when you have Pink Floyd on your label. Look at Dire Straits. Hardly the most fashion-conscious group, and yet they’re the biggest band in the world. Talk Talk have always seen that side of things as a distraction from the music.»

Hollis’s rocky relationship with the press swiftly gained him a reputation as being something of a surly, self-obsessed character.

«You can understand that, though,» argues Friese-Greene. «When Mark started up he was sometimes doing 12 interviews a day. That just drives you mad after a while and you have to do something, wind the journalist up or whatever, to remain sane.»

Reading on mobile? Watch here

«It doesn’t worry me that Mark is seen as uncooperative,» says Wadsworth. «It worries me more that we might put him in a situation that might compromise him. I can fully understand that a serious artist like Mark does not want to go on Saturday morning children’s television and have 10 gallons of sludge poured over him and then be presented with a giant inflatable banana. I mean, this man is a father!»

Mark Hollis is aware that he is perceived as «a difficult geezer» at times. This, he says, is because he won’t «play that game» of handshaking and pleasantry-exchanging. But rather than giving the impression of being a terse, rapier-tongued weasel, he comes over more as a nervous, pensive individual with a few ideas of great import to unleash upon the populace.

He is motivated, he says, by the need to make great and «increasingly personal» music. «Money is not a worry,» he sniffs. «I’ve got all the money I need.»

Indeed, the sales of Talk Talk’s three LPs to date have been mightily respectable. The Party’s Over – promoted by two hit singles and a sizable American tour supporting Elvis Costello – sold over a quarter million copies; their second album, It’s My Life, went gold in every European country except Britain, selling particularly well following exhaustive live work, in Italy («I couldn’t tell you why that was,» mutters Hollis. «You’d have to ask everyone in Britain and then everyone in Italy, I suppose»); The Colour of Spring aided and abetted by the top 20 single Life’s What You Make It, also went gold. Split the net profits and divide between Hollis, Friese-Greene, drummer Harris and bass player Paul Webb who comprise the group’s – hey! – floating nucleus and it doesn’t take long to fathom out how Hollis can afford to sit in his Suffolk village rectory and «just do music, really». Ask Tim Friese-Greene if Hollis is the most boring person in the world, he will pause and reply, «No … he’s probably the second most boring person in the world, because, according to him, there is no one more boring than me.»

One wonders how they mustered the energy to produce such a reaction-provoking record. «Well, it’s certainly a reaction to the music that’s around at the moment, ‘cos most of that is shit,» deadpans Hollis. «It’s only radical in the modern context. It’s not radical compared to what was happening 20 years ago. If we’d have delivered this album to the record company 20 years ago they wouldn’t have batted an eyelid.»

Would you recommend any particular situation in which to listen to it?

«Late at night definitely. In a very calm mood with no distractions.»

You don’t think it would make rather pleasant background music at, say, a dinner party?

«No I don’t. Maybe after the dinner party. But you have to give it all your attention. You should never listen to music as background music. Ever.»

Talk Talk’s original plan of action was not to release a single or a video from the album. Neither did they intend to tour. Although they still won’t be playing live («People would just want to hear the songs as they are on the album and for me that’s not satisfying enough,» Hollis frowns), they have since reconsidered, with a little record company pressure, and edited the track I Believe In You down to airplay length.

«It’s purely in order to help the record company promote this album,» says Hollis. «Purely that.» He has also, now, recorded a promotional video to accompany the single.

«I really feel that was a massive mistake.» he grimaces. «I thought just by sitting there and listening and really thinking about what it was about, I could get that in my eyes. But you cannot do it. It just feels stupid. It was depressing and I wish I’d never done it.»

«See,» he spits, «that’s what happens when you compromise.»

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/aug/28/from-rocks-backpages-talk-talk

Music co-operatives: helping artists survive amid austerity – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 28 agosto 2013 2:53 pm

As the cuts to arts funding continue to bite ever deeper, increasing numbers of musicians are now championing co-ops as a way of ensuring their own long-term survival.

In a landmark move earlier this summer, the Musicians’ Union joined Co-operatives UK, the national trade body that supports co-ops across the country.

«We’re promoting the co-operative model to all our members as a possible way forward to protect their interests and promote better working arrangements in the current challenging economic times,» says Fran Hanley from the MU which supports over 30,000 performers, composers and music teachers.

The MU has noted with alarm the growing trend by local authority music services to downgrade employment protection and contract peripatetic music teachers as self employed or worse, on zero hours contracts.

«Such contracts minimise teachers’ pay and pensions and withdraws protection from unfair dismissal,» says Hanley.

«Consequently teachers have less incentive to commit to one local music provider leading to ever greater fragmentation, something which is confusing for both parents and schools.»

«We believe that as more and more local authorities outsource their music services the co-operative model represents a real alternative to some of the employment changes being imposed on our members.»

There are currently just under 20 registered musician co-ops, however according to Nick Molyneux from Co-operatives UK, this figure is likely to be somewhat inaccurate:

«Our feeling is that there are many more musicians out there that operate as co-operatives but who are either not incorporated or do not self-identify as co-operatives as it will just be the natural way that they organise themselves,» explains Molyneux.

«The work that we are currently doing with the Musicians’ Union will help to clarify numbers.»

One of the most recent musician co-ops to launch is Sinfonia Musicisti, a 40 piece orchestra which became incorporated as an industrial provident society in September 2012.

«I’ve been involved with a number of music groups which have collapsed due to financial difficulties brought on a by the worsening funding environment for the arts,» explains Mark Kesel who was one of the main drivers behind the launch of Sinfonia Musicisti.

«The aim of the co-op is that our players will share the benefits and risks of the business and it is this equitable approach that allows us to offer an affordable programme of music from a professional orchestra.»

Kesel, who is a trumpet player, believes that the sense of shared ownership which is part and parcel of being a co-op member is crucial to resolving many of the problems associated with the often precarious world of the professional musician:

«All too often the problem is that there’s a lack of communication between musicians and the management running the orchestra. The result is that when times are tough musicians have no sense of ownership and are only interested in getting their fee, which often they fail to get.»

«On the other hand a shared sense of ownership, which is what you get from a co-op, means that the musicians will be prepared to see the orchestra through when times get tough because they’ll be incentivised to ensure that the co-op survives,» says Kesel.

Key to the launch of Sinfonia Musicisti was support from both the Artists Recording Companyand the University of Northampton who are currently exploring new ways of funding classical music with the aim of making it more accessible to the widest possible audience.

Whilst performing musicians invariably grab the limelight, the reality is that around two thirds of the MU’s members earn their living from working in education as music teachers.

One of the oldest running music teacher co-ops is Swindon Music Co-operative which was launched in 1998 following Swindon Borough Council’s decision to close down its instrumental teaching service.

David Barnard, who at the time was Swindon Borough’s director of music spoke to the MU’s membership magazine The Musician earlier this summer about how the co-op came about:

«We needed to find a solution that retained a sense of unity and common purpose while reducing the cost of provision and a co-op was an ideal solution.»

Today as a partner of Swindon Music Education Partnership, Swindon Music Co-operative is the main provider of instrumental and vocal tuition in over 70 local schools with over 50 self-employed specialist music teachers.

Secretary general of Co-operatives UK Ed Mayo believes that there’s an untapped opportunity for more musician co-ops:

«There are already some successes such as the Swindon Music Co-operative but there is so much more potential for growth and to support even more musicians,» says Mayo.

«Co-operatives are particularly relevant for groups of self-employed people such as music teachers or musicians who could benefit from collaborating, coming together to market themselves and protecting their interests.»

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional. To join the social enterprise network, click here.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/social-enterprise-network/2013/aug/28/music-cooperatives-arts-survival

Suede – For The Strangers: Exclusive video – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 28 agosto 2013 2:53 pm

Reading on mobile? Click here to watch

Taken from their sixth studio album Bloodsports, Suede’s single For The Strangers is due out in October. The video for the track – premiered here – uses footage from their triumphant comeback gig at Alexandra Palace in March, and was directed by Ben Lankester. Featuring Brett and his band performing ten years since their split, the video is an emotional slice of screaming fans and sweating men shot in black and white, while avoiding any schmaltzy tour video clichés by cutting out those poignant backstage pre-gig group-hugs.

As well as the new single, Suede will also release The Vinyl Collection through Demon Music – a box set containing all 6 of their studio albums and their b-side collection on vinyl.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2013/aug/27/1

Miley Cyrus’ antics the talk of the MTV Video Music Awards – euronews

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 28 agosto 2013 2:53 pm




The much anticipated MTV Video Music Awards were held on Sunday night in Brooklyn and crowds of screaming fans were not left disappointed, with costumes and controversy offered up in equal measure.

Setting the tone for the night, the show was opened by Lady Gaga who performed her new single “Applause” in a series of outfits ranging from a square nun’s habit to a bikini thong. Her appearance was a little tame by Gaga standards, with no meat-suits or gun-bras to be seen.

Taking over the role of ‘most shocking act’ was Miley Cyrus (pictured above). The former Disney Channel actress, who took to the stage with dancing teddy bears before stripping off to a nude bikini where she ‘twerked’ to her new song “We can’t stop”. Cyrus’ previous good-girl image was finally put to rest when she appeared to give co-singer Robin Thicke a lap dance and made lewd gestures with a foam hand.

The raunchy performance certainly seemed to shock many members of the public and seconds later the talk of Twitter was this photo, claiming to show actor Will Smith and his family reacting to the performance.

UK heart-throbs One Direction picked up an award – dubbed a Moonman – for best song of the summer, but they seemed to be booed by some of the audience. This could have been something to do with the reaction of Taylor Swift, band member Harry Style’s ex-girlfriend, who seemed to mutter “Shut the f**k up” while the band collected their trophy.

Kanye West did not storm any stages this year but he did sing his latest new tune from album “Yeezus” in a haunting performance that featured Steve McQueens’ lynching tree. The single “Blood on the Leaves” samples Nina Simone’s 1965 jazz cover of Billie Holiday’s 1939 recording “Strange Fruit,” a song heavy with commentary on slavery and racism.

Hip-hop artists Macklemore & Ryan Lewis won the award for Best Video with a Social Message for their song “Same Love”. The song has become an anthem for LGBT rights and while collecting his award Macklemore said: “Out of every single song that I have ever written, to me this is the most important record out of all of them…Gay rights are human rights, there is no separation.”

Justin Timberlake picked up the big prizes including Video of the Year and Best Male Video. He wowed fans with a medley of his biggest hits and then surprised audiences by reuniting with his ex-band mates ‘NSync for a one-time only comeback performance. The singer and actor also received a life-time achievement award for his contribution to MTV culture. While receiving the Moonman he said: “Half of the Moonmen I’ve ever won, I won with those four guys right there…So above all else, I’m going to share this, we can keep it my house, but I’m going to share this award with them.”

More about: ,

Copyright © 2013 euronews




Source Article from http://www.euronews.com/2013/08/26/mtv-video-music-awards/

Miley Cyrus criticised for raunchy MTV Video Music Awards performance – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 28 agosto 2013 4:47 am

An organisation backed by Miley Cyrus‘s dad has criticised a raunchy MTV Video Music Awards performance by … Miley Cyrus. The Parents Television Council have accused MTV of «falsely manipulating the content rating» for their program, encouraging children to watch «adults-only material» such as Cyrus’s twerking routine with Robyn Thicke.

As the New York Times points out, conservative outrage is nothing new for MTV’s skin-studded red-letter night. It’s not even the first time that a former child star writhed in flesh-tone underthings. But Cyrus isn’t just the previously family-friendly Hannah Montana: she is also the daughter of country singer Billy Ray Cyrus, who sits on the Parents Television Council’s advisory board.

Although the Parents Television Council’s press release did not mention Billy Ray, it did single out Miley’s tongue-waggling performance: «MTV continues to sexually exploit young women by promoting acts that incorporate ‘twerking’ in a nude-coloured bikini,» it wrote. «How is this image of former child star Miley Cyrus appropriate for 14-year-olds?» However the council also underlined that sexually provocative pop stars aren’t the object of its indignation – MTV’s parental ratings are.


Link to video: MTV VMAs: Miley Cyrus performance sparks criticism

Billy Ray Cyrus’s response was more ambivalent. «Thanking God for so many blessings tonight,» he tweeted in the hours after the VMAs. «Continue to pray for world peace. More love … less hate.» But the 52-year-old later explained that he wasn’t referring to Miley’s performance: he was talking about Syrian war crimes. «FYI … late last night I was watching devastating news out of Syria,» he wrote. «Chemical weapons used on innocent children is unacceptable!»

Miley Cyrus’s fourth album, Bangerz, is out 4 October.

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/aug/27/miley-cyrus-mtv-video-music-awards-criticism

Liverpool International Music Festival ‘a success’ – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | miércoles 28 agosto 2013 4:47 am







Fireworks as part of Liverpool festivalFireworks following the Liverpool Royal Philharmonic performance


Organisers of the Liverpool International Music Festival have hailed their first four-day event as a success.

The festival combined pop and classical music at Sefton Park and the Pier Head over the Bank holiday weekend.

Merseyside Police said there had been nine arrests during the event – six over Saturday and Sunday, and three on Monday.

But festival director Claire McColgan said it had been a «fantastic weekend».

«Our ambition is to create an Edinburgh Festival for music,» she said.


Soul II Soul

«It went better than we thought, it was just fantastic – it was much bigger than Mathew Street (festival).

«We’ve been planning it for five months. Just seeing thousands of families having a fantastic weekend together just makes it worthwhile.»

The festival began on Friday with the Liverpool Royal Philharmonic Orchestra led by chief conductor Vasily Petrenko, at Sefton Park, and fireworks.

Among the bands playing were The Saturdays, Soul II Soul, The Christians, Little Mix and JLS.


‘Phoenix rising’

Jazzie B from Soul II Soul said: «We drove down Penny Lane to soak up the atmosphere. I feel so energetic, I feel like 16 again. I’ve always loved Liverpool.»

Gary Christian, of the Christians, said it would be fantastic if the festival was held every year as he found it «friendlier and better» than the Mathew Street Festival.

«It’s like a phoenix rising from the depths of despair. Now we’re becoming more international and more on the map – not just this provincial little town,» he said.

The festival continues with The Farm and Amsterdam at Stanley Park on 8 September.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-23849242

In pictures: Stars attend MTV Video Music Awards 2013 – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 27 agosto 2013 11:45 pm

‘);
glow.dom.get(«#bbccom_sponsor_section_relocated»).append(imageNode);
glow.dom.get(«#bbccom_sponsor_section_relocated»).css({
«float»: «left»,
«margin»: «0px»,
«padding-top»: «10px»,
«margin-bottom»: «7px»,
«padding-bottom»: «8px»
});
glow.dom.get(«#bbccom_sponsor_section_text»).css({
«float»: «left»,
«padding-right»: «4px»
});

glow.dom.get(«#bbccom_sponsor_section_image»).css({
});
}
}
glow.ready(bbccom_draw);
}
});


Page last updated at 07:41 GMT, Tuesday, 27 August 2013 08:41 UK


Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/23846518

Liverpool International Music Festival ‘a success’ – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | martes 27 agosto 2013 11:45 pm







Fireworks as part of Liverpool festivalFireworks following the Liverpool Royal Philharmonic performance


Organisers of the Liverpool International Music Festival have hailed their first four-day event as a success.

The festival combined pop and classical music at Sefton Park and the Pier Head over the Bank holiday weekend.

Merseyside Police said there had been nine arrests during the event – six over Saturday and Sunday, and three on Monday.

But festival director Claire McColgan said it had been a «fantastic weekend».

«Our ambition is to create an Edinburgh Festival for music,» she said.


Soul II Soul

«It went better than we thought, it was just fantastic – it was much bigger than Mathew Street (festival).

«We’ve been planning it for five months. Just seeing thousands of families having a fantastic weekend together just makes it worthwhile.»

The festival began on Friday with the Liverpool Royal Philharmonic Orchestra led by chief conductor Vasily Petrenko, at Sefton Park, and fireworks.

Among the bands playing were The Saturdays, Soul II Soul, The Christians, Little Mix and JLS.


‘Phoenix rising’

Jazzie B from Soul II Soul said: «We drove down Penny Lane to soak up the atmosphere. I feel so energetic, I feel like 16 again. I’ve always loved Liverpool.»

Gary Christian, of the Christians, said it would be fantastic if the festival was held every year as he found it «friendlier and better» than the Mathew Street Festival.

«It’s like a phoenix rising from the depths of despair. Now we’re becoming more international and more on the map – not just this provincial little town,» he said.

The festival continues with The Farm and Amsterdam at Stanley Park on 8 September.

Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-23849242

« Página anteriorPágina siguiente »

Friend sites: Futbol hoy | Futbol en la tele