Twenty years after In Utero, Nirvana’s importance hasn’t diminished – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Saturday 31 August 2013 11:36 pm

I can walk down the street and someone will come up and say, ‘Weren’t you the bassist in Nirvana?’” says Krist Novoselic. “And I’ll hear a story about how our music changed their life. How their parents were going through a divorce, or how they were in rehab, and the music helped them through. Or, ‘I was in a kibbutz that summer, and Nevermind was the soundtrack; I had the time of my life.’ The music connected with people in an incredibly personal way.” He’s quiet for a second. “I don’t know how I can explain that.”

If Novoselic and his Nirvana bandmate Dave Grohl, today leader of stadium rock giants Foo Fighters, still struggle to define the nature of their former band’s unique alchemy, the world isn’t sick of hearing about it quite yet. The two surviving members of the band are commemorating the 20th birthday of the group’s third and final studio album In Utero. Instead of a cake, there’s a box set: a four-disc, 89-track block that, in honesty, doesn’t so much scrape the barrel as tunnel through its base, carve through the floor tiles and penetrate several layers of top soil. Luckily, none of this tarnishes In Utero itself, an album of caustic rock and cryptic, sometimes grotesque, lyricism that exploded like a ripe boil on the face of the mainstream. “That was Kurt Cobain’s artistic vision,” says Novoselic. “It was strange, fierce, kind of weird, but beautiful at the same time.”

Nirvana never set out to change the world. In 1991, they were a promising punk-rock band from Washington State with a debut major-label album that might, with luck, sell in the six figures. Then MTV started rinsing Smells Like Teen Spirit, Nevermind unseated Michael Jackson’s Dangerous from the top of the Billboard chart, and Kurt Cobain became the reluctant poster boy of a new sound – grunge. “The first thing we did when Nevermind went huge is cancel everything and go into hiding,” recalls Grohl. “U2 and Guns N’ Roses wanted us to tour with them, Lollapalooza wanted us to headline. All these offers, and we thought, ‘Let’s just go home and take the ball with us.’ Like, game over.”


NIRVANA
The band in 1990, pre-Nevermind. Photograph: Pictorial Press Ltd / Alamy/Alamy

Nirvana’s musical response was In Utero. In defiance of their label, Geffen, they called upon the production talents of Steve Albini, alternative rock firebrand behind acerbic noise groups Big Black and Rapeman. Instead of radio-friendly unit shifters, there was a song sarcastically titled Radio Friendly Unit Shifter, smothered in squalling feedback. Cobain’s songs touched on fatherhood (Milk It, Scentless Apprentice) and feminism (Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle, a fantasy of cosmic vengeance for a 1940s actress subjected to brutal mistreatment while incarcerated in an asylum). But it also dwelt on the gynaecological and the diseased: see the sickly-sweet Heart-Shaped Box, with its cancerous growths, carnivorous orchids and “umbilical noose”. Occasionally, the album’s bluntness still alarms.

It’s hard to draw much holy wisdom from In Utero’s tumult of anger, black humour, principle, guilt and confusion. “Nirvana were conflicted,” says Novoselic. “We cut our teeth on 1980s American hardcore – intense and political music about independence from the state, independence from corporations. We were appalled by the first Iraq war, the jingoism, the petty nationalism. But at the same time we signed a record deal with Geffen, a subsidiary of this Japanese industrial electronics company. Bands like Pavement and Fugazi remained fiercely independent. We had punk-rock values, but we signed those papers. I can’t sit here and give you the spiel about independence, especially knowing [Fugazi's] Ian MacKaye. I could never face them again.”

From their major label vantage point, though, Nirvana reached an audience their indie peers could only dream of. “We meant a lot of different things to a lot of different people,” says Grohl. “That’s one of the great things about music. You can sing a song to 85,000 people and they’ll sing it back for 85,000 different reasons.” Ever upbeat, Grohl is optimistic about the current state of rock, thrilled to hear young bands still cite Nirvana as an influence. “We were real and visceral, fucked-up and ugly. That was what people were craving. And that will never go away. There’s a band in a garage right now writing songs for an album that will do the same thing Nevermind did some 20 years ago. We don’t know who and where, but it will fucking happen again. All it takes is for that storm to break.”

More so than Nevermind, In Utero pointed underground – to alternative rock and the punk feminism of riot grrrl. But its influence spread outwards, too. Liam Howlett heard the gnarly riff of Very Ape, the two-minute blast that kicked off side two, and sampled it for the Prodigy’s 1994 single Voodoo People. Following his death, Kurt became a lyrical namedrop for rappers from 2Pac to 50 Cent to Jay-Z, who evidently found something relatable in this nihilistic rock star and his tale of drugs, guns and untimely death. Grunge was supplanted in the marketplace by nu-metal, but Limp Bizkit’s Fred Durst described Kurt as “an inspiration”. And when the next Voice Of A Generation came along, you couldn’t help but look at Marshall Mathers, a bleach-blond Molotov of rage, and spy something faintly familiar.

The 20th anniversary reissue of In Utero is out on 23 Sep

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/aug/31/nirvana-dave-grohl-krist-novoselic-in-utero

Twenty years after In Utero, Nirvana’s importance hasn’t diminished – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Saturday 31 August 2013 6:35 pm

I can walk down the street and someone will come up and say, ‘Weren’t you the bassist in Nirvana?’” says Krist Novoselic. “And I’ll hear a story about how our music changed their life. How their parents were going through a divorce, or how they were in rehab, and the music helped them through. Or, ‘I was in a kibbutz that summer, and Nevermind was the soundtrack; I had the time of my life.’ The music connected with people in an incredibly personal way.” He’s quiet for a second. “I don’t know how I can explain that.”

If Novoselic and his Nirvana bandmate Dave Grohl, today leader of stadium rock giants Foo Fighters, still struggle to define the nature of their former band’s unique alchemy, the world isn’t sick of hearing about it quite yet. The two surviving members of the band are commemorating the 20th birthday of the group’s third and final studio album In Utero. Instead of a cake, there’s a box set: a four-disc, 89-track block that, in honesty, doesn’t so much scrape the barrel as tunnel through its base, carve through the floor tiles and penetrate several layers of top soil. Luckily, none of this tarnishes In Utero itself, an album of caustic rock and cryptic, sometimes grotesque, lyricism that exploded like a ripe boil on the face of the mainstream. “That was Kurt Cobain’s artistic vision,” says Novoselic. “It was strange, fierce, kind of weird, but beautiful at the same time.”

Nirvana never set out to change the world. In 1991, they were a promising punk-rock band from Washington State with a debut major-label album that might, with luck, sell in the six figures. Then MTV started rinsing Smells Like Teen Spirit, Nevermind unseated Michael Jackson’s Dangerous from the top of the Billboard chart, and Kurt Cobain became the reluctant poster boy of a new sound – grunge. “The first thing we did when Nevermind went huge is cancel everything and go into hiding,” recalls Grohl. “U2 and Guns N’ Roses wanted us to tour with them, Lollapalooza wanted us to headline. All these offers, and we thought, ‘Let’s just go home and take the ball with us.’ Like, game over.”


NIRVANA
The band in 1990, pre-Nevermind. Photograph: Pictorial Press Ltd / Alamy/Alamy

Nirvana’s musical response was In Utero. In defiance of their label, Geffen, they called upon the production talents of Steve Albini, alternative rock firebrand behind acerbic noise groups Big Black and Rapeman. Instead of radio-friendly unit shifters, there was a song sarcastically titled Radio Friendly Unit Shifter, smothered in squalling feedback. Cobain’s songs touched on fatherhood (Milk It, Scentless Apprentice) and feminism (Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle, a fantasy of cosmic vengeance for a 1940s actress subjected to brutal mistreatment while incarcerated in an asylum). But it also dwelt on the gynaecological and the diseased: see the sickly-sweet Heart-Shaped Box, with its cancerous growths, carnivorous orchids and “umbilical noose”. Occasionally, the album’s bluntness still alarms.

It’s hard to draw much holy wisdom from In Utero’s tumult of anger, black humour, principle, guilt and confusion. “Nirvana were conflicted,” says Novoselic. “We cut our teeth on 1980s American hardcore – intense and political music about independence from the state, independence from corporations. We were appalled by the first Iraq war, the jingoism, the petty nationalism. But at the same time we signed a record deal with Geffen, a subsidiary of this Japanese industrial electronics company. Bands like Pavement and Fugazi remained fiercely independent. We had punk-rock values, but we signed those papers. I can’t sit here and give you the spiel about independence, especially knowing [Fugazi's] Ian MacKaye. I could never face them again.”

From their major label vantage point, though, Nirvana reached an audience their indie peers could only dream of. “We meant a lot of different things to a lot of different people,” says Grohl. “That’s one of the great things about music. You can sing a song to 85,000 people and they’ll sing it back for 85,000 different reasons.” Ever upbeat, Grohl is optimistic about the current state of rock, thrilled to hear young bands still cite Nirvana as an influence. “We were real and visceral, fucked-up and ugly. That was what people were craving. And that will never go away. There’s a band in a garage right now writing songs for an album that will do the same thing Nevermind did some 20 years ago. We don’t know who and where, but it will fucking happen again. All it takes is for that storm to break.”

More so than Nevermind, In Utero pointed underground – to alternative rock and the punk feminism of riot grrrl. But its influence spread outwards, too. Liam Howlett heard the gnarly riff of Very Ape, the two-minute blast that kicked off side two, and sampled it for the Prodigy’s 1994 single Voodoo People. Following his death, Kurt became a lyrical namedrop for rappers from 2Pac to 50 Cent to Jay-Z, who evidently found something relatable in this nihilistic rock star and his tale of drugs, guns and untimely death. Grunge was supplanted in the marketplace by nu-metal, but Limp Bizkit’s Fred Durst described Kurt as “an inspiration”. And when the next Voice Of A Generation came along, you couldn’t help but look at Marshall Mathers, a bleach-blond Molotov of rage, and spy something faintly familiar.

The 20th anniversary reissue of In Utero is out on 23 Sep

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/aug/31/nirvana-dave-grohl-krist-novoselic-in-utero

Music made by your brainwaves – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Saturday 31 August 2013 8:29 am

If your thoughts could power music, what sound would they make?

The BBC met programmer Adam Williams who, along with team members Robert Wollner and Alex Wakeman, created a program which uses a brainwave-sensing headset to power a musical composition.

The Soul Filter was on show at Art Hack, an event organised by 3beards, a company which specialises in organising gatherings of east London’s start-up community.

Mr Williams’ father offered up his brainwaves to give the technology a try.

Video produced by Dave Lee and Nastaran Tavakoli-Far



Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23904077

Goldfish, the classical music aficionados: The famously forgetful fish can … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Saturday 31 August 2013 8:29 am
  • Fish able to distinguish composers around three quarters of the time
  • They even developed personal tastes, claims study by Japanese team

By
Daily Mail Reporter

23:49 GMT, 30 August 2013


|

23:52 GMT, 30 August 2013

Goldfish may be forgetful, but when it comes to classical music, it seems they know what they like.

They can distinguish between a piece by 18th century German composer Johann Sebastian Bach and one by 20th century Russian Igor Stravinsky, a study found.

Japanese researchers played goldfish Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor and Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring. They trained four of them to bite a red bead on hearing one piece, but not the other.

Fishy: Goldfish have evolved to develop similar hearing mechanisms as seemingly far more complex animals, said researchers who painstakingly trained them to tell the difference between Bach and Stravinsky

Holy mackerel! Goldfish have evolved to develop similar
hearing mechanisms as seemingly far more complex animals, said
researchers who painstakingly trained them to tell the difference
between Bach and Stravinsky

Professor Sigeru Watanabe, from the department of psychology at Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, said goldfish have evolved to develop similar hearing mechanisms as seemingly far more complex animals.

He said: ‘Humans… can easily recognise and enjoy a variety of types of music.

‘Several studies have investigated whether these properties of music exist in non-human animals.

‘Goldfish are known as a hearing specialist species, since they have evolved a structure to enhance auditory signals detected by the inner ear.

‘This suggests that goldfish have evolved specific features for hearing and can recognise complex auditory stimuli similar to those recognised by modern vertebrates.’

The researchers carried out several experiments, and eventually trained four goldfish to either bite the bead to one piece of music and to do nothing when the other was playing.

The fish were able to distinguish between the music around three quarters of the time.

But they were not fast learners – it took more than 100 training sessions before they were able to distinguish the pieces.

The scientists also tested to see whether the fish would recognise other pieces by the same composers that they had never heard before.

However found they did not appear to recognise them and instead the fish swam around randomly.

Painting of Johann Sebastian Bach
Russian composer and conductor Igor Stravinsky, aged 83

Academic fishing expedition: Like humans, the fish did seem to show some individual tastes – one fish avoided music by Bach, left, and preferred Stravinsky, right, while another fish avoided Stravinsky, the study found

In another experiment involving six different goldfish, the scientists found the animals did not appear to show any strong preference for a particular type of music.

However, like humans, the fish did seem to show some individual tastes – one fish avoided Bach’s music and preferred Stravinsky while another of the fish avoided Stravinsky.

Professor Watanabe added: ‘For those subjects, the musical stimuli might have a certain kind of reinforcing properties, although it was not consistent among individuals.

‘On the other hand, three of the six subjects did not show any preferences for areas of the tank in which music was presented.’

The findings go some way to disproving myths that suggest goldfish are relatively simple creatures with low levels of intelligence.

According to popular myth they have a memory span of only 15 seconds.

But recent research has suggested that goldfish can have a memory span of up to three months.

The comments below have not been moderated.

Bet they love Handel’s ‘Water Music’ !

Keith
,

Kettering,
31/8/2013 09:20

I’m no goldfish but even I can tell the difference between Bach and Stravinsky

Expat-reader
,

Moscow Russia,
31/8/2013 08:53

That’s all we need now – a Japanese goldfish psychologist !

Glider
,

Evesham,
31/8/2013 08:30

My goldfish prefers a good classical play as he feels classical music somewhat limited.

ebo
,

burnley,
31/8/2013 08:10

Wonder what star sign it was born under? My dog is an Aries, but my goldfish is an Aquarium!

Millie6
,

West Yorkshire,
31/8/2013 07:55

I think what the fish might detect is vibrations coming through the water which affects their whole bodies – much as you can `feel` the music in a loud disco. One only has to listen to Bach and then to the persistent `thump thum` beat of the rote of spring and it is no wonder the fish can tell the difference. Place a glass of water close to your hi-fi speaker and you will see different vibration patterns on the surface of the water with different music. “Goldfish turned on by Stravinsky seeks job as a jack-hammer operative”

Roy
,

Billericay, United Kingdom,
31/8/2013 07:48

You can’t base your opinion of an entire species on a study of four individuals. Flawed.

liking nyc
,

NYC, United States,
31/8/2013 07:25

Goldfish are orange. Scientists are weird.

liking nyc
,

NYC, United States,
31/8/2013 07:24

Is the next step to train the goldfish to tell the difference between JS and JC ?

BARGET
,

SOUTH YORKSHIRE, United Kingdom,
31/8/2013 07:17

I would have thought even an ant could tell the difference between Bach and Stravinsky.!

BARGET
,

SOUTH YORKSHIRE, United Kingdom,
31/8/2013 07:12

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2407609/Goldfish-classical-music-aficionados-The-famously-forgetful-fish-distinguish-Bach-Stravinsky-study-shows.html

Twenty years after In Utero, Nirvana’s importance hasn’t diminished – The Guardian

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Saturday 31 August 2013 8:29 am

I can walk down the street and someone will come up and say, ‘Weren’t you the bassist in Nirvana?’” says Krist Novoselic. “And I’ll hear a story about how our music changed their life. How their parents were going through a divorce, or how they were in rehab, and the music helped them through. Or, ‘I was in a kibbutz that summer, and Nevermind was the soundtrack; I had the time of my life.’ The music connected with people in an incredibly personal way.” He’s quiet for a second. “I don’t know how I can explain that.”

If Novoselic and his Nirvana bandmate Dave Grohl, today leader of stadium rock giants Foo Fighters, still struggle to define the nature of their former band’s unique alchemy, the world isn’t sick of hearing about it quite yet. The two surviving members of the band are commemorating the 20th birthday of the group’s third and final studio album In Utero. Instead of a cake, there’s a box set: a four-disc, 89-track block that, in honesty, doesn’t so much scrape the barrel as tunnel through its base, carve through the floor tiles and penetrate several layers of top soil. Luckily, none of this tarnishes In Utero itself, an album of caustic rock and cryptic, sometimes grotesque, lyricism that exploded like a ripe boil on the face of the mainstream. “That was Kurt Cobain’s artistic vision,” says Novoselic. “It was strange, fierce, kind of weird, but beautiful at the same time.”

Nirvana never set out to change the world. In 1991, they were a promising punk-rock band from Washington State with a debut major-label album that might, with luck, sell in the six figures. Then MTV started rinsing Smells Like Teen Spirit, Nevermind unseated Michael Jackson’s Dangerous from the top of the Billboard chart, and Kurt Cobain became the reluctant poster boy of a new sound – grunge. “The first thing we did when Nevermind went huge is cancel everything and go into hiding,” recalls Grohl. “U2 and Guns N’ Roses wanted us to tour with them, Lollapalooza wanted us to headline. All these offers, and we thought, ‘Let’s just go home and take the ball with us.’ Like, game over.”


NIRVANA
The band in 1990, pre-Nevermind. Photograph: Pictorial Press Ltd / Alamy/Alamy

Nirvana’s musical response was In Utero. In defiance of their label, Geffen, they called upon the production talents of Steve Albini, alternative rock firebrand behind acerbic noise groups Big Black and Rapeman. Instead of radio-friendly unit shifters, there was a song sarcastically titled Radio Friendly Unit Shifter, smothered in squalling feedback. Cobain’s songs touched on fatherhood (Milk It, Scentless Apprentice) and feminism (Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle, a fantasy of cosmic vengeance for a 1940s actress subjected to brutal mistreatment while incarcerated in an asylum). But it also dwelt on the gynaecological and the diseased: see the sickly-sweet Heart-Shaped Box, with its cancerous growths, carnivorous orchids and “umbilical noose”. Occasionally, the album’s bluntness still alarms.

It’s hard to draw much holy wisdom from In Utero’s tumult of anger, black humour, principle, guilt and confusion. “Nirvana were conflicted,” says Novoselic. “We cut our teeth on 1980s American hardcore – intense and political music about independence from the state, independence from corporations. We were appalled by the first Iraq war, the jingoism, the petty nationalism. But at the same time we signed a record deal with Geffen, a subsidiary of this Japanese industrial electronics company. Bands like Pavement and Fugazi remained fiercely independent. We had punk-rock values, but we signed those papers. I can’t sit here and give you the spiel about independence, especially knowing [Fugazi's] Ian MacKaye. I could never face them again.”

From their major label vantage point, though, Nirvana reached an audience their indie peers could only dream of. “We meant a lot of different things to a lot of different people,” says Grohl. “That’s one of the great things about music. You can sing a song to 85,000 people and they’ll sing it back for 85,000 different reasons.” Ever upbeat, Grohl is optimistic about the current state of rock, thrilled to hear young bands still cite Nirvana as an influence. “We were real and visceral, fucked-up and ugly. That was what people were craving. And that will never go away. There’s a band in a garage right now writing songs for an album that will do the same thing Nevermind did some 20 years ago. We don’t know who and where, but it will fucking happen again. All it takes is for that storm to break.”

More so than Nevermind, In Utero pointed underground – to alternative rock and the punk feminism of riot grrrl. But its influence spread outwards, too. Liam Howlett heard the gnarly riff of Very Ape, the two-minute blast that kicked off side two, and sampled it for the Prodigy’s 1994 single Voodoo People. Following his death, Kurt became a lyrical namedrop for rappers from 2Pac to 50 Cent to Jay-Z, who evidently found something relatable in this nihilistic rock star and his tale of drugs, guns and untimely death. Grunge was supplanted in the marketplace by nu-metal, but Limp Bizkit’s Fred Durst described Kurt as “an inspiration”. And when the next Voice Of A Generation came along, you couldn’t help but look at Marshall Mathers, a bleach-blond Molotov of rage, and spy something faintly familiar.

The 20th anniversary reissue of In Utero is out on 23 Sep

Source Article from http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/aug/31/nirvana-dave-grohl-krist-novoselic-in-utero

When music is the only common language – BBC News

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Friday 30 August 2013 10:24 pm

When New York’s Joe Driscoll and Guinea Conakry’s Sekou Kouyate first met, they had no language in common – except for music.

Through the kora, guitar and vocals, they combine cultures and musical traditions in an explosive fusion.

BBC Africa’s Baya Cat met the duo on the UK festival scene to soak up their sounds and find out how this unlikely pairing came about.

For more African news from the BBC, download the Africa Today podcast.



Source Article from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-23901416

Goldfish are music connoisseurs – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Friday 30 August 2013 10:24 pm

Professor Sigeru Watanabe, who supervised the research at the department of
psychology at Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, said: “Psychologically, music
can be considered to have two types of properties: discriminative stimulus
properties and reinforcing properties.

“These properties are apparent in humans, because we can easily recognise and
enjoy a variety of types of music.

“Several studies have investigated whether these properties of music exist in
non-human animals.

“Goldfish (Carassius auratus) are known as a hearing specialist species, since
they have evolved a structure to enhance auditory signals detected by the
inner ear.

“This suggests that goldfish have evolved specific features for hearing and
can recognise complex auditory stimuli similar to those recognised by modern
vertebrates.”

The scientists, whose research is published in the journal Behavioural
Processes
, first trained four goldfish to bite the bead and receive
a pellet of food from a tube in their tank.

They were then divided into two groups and were trained to do this when either
20 second long clips of Bach or Stravinsky were playing.

Between each clip the music was muted for varying amounts of time – meaning
with each session the clips of music the fish heard were not consistently
the same.

The goldfish were then trained to either bite the bead to one piece of music
and to do nothing when the other was playing.

The researchers found that the fish were able to distinguish between the music
around three quarters of the time.

However, the fish were not fast learners – it took more than 100 training
sessions before they were able to distinguish the pieces.

But the fact goldfish were able to distinguish two types of classical music at
all was impressive given that some humans will claim they struggle to
differentiate.

In reality, however, humans are highly attuned to distinguish between pieces
of music – a fact evidenced by the tendency for songs to become stuck in our
heads.

The scientists also tested to see whether the fish would recognise other
pieces by the same composers that they had never heard before.

However found they did not appear to recognise them and instead the fish swam
around randomly.

The researchers said they believe the fish might be able to distinguish
between new music if they had been trained with several pieces by each
composer.

In a second experiment involving six different goldfish, the scientists found
the animals did not appear to show any strong preference for a particular
type of music.

However, like humans, the fish did seem to show some individual tastes – one
fish avoided Bach’s music and preferred Stravinsky while another of the fish
avoided Stravinsky.

Professor Watanabe said: “For those subjects, the musical stimuli might have a
certain kind of reinforcing properties, although it was not consistent among
individuals.

“On the other hand, three of the six subjects did not show any preferences for
areas of the tank in which music was presented.”

Bach’s music seemed to be preferred by one of the fish involved in the
study

The findings go some way to disproving myths that suggest goldfish are
relatively simple creatures with low levels of intelligence.

In fact recent research has suggested that goldfish can have a memory span of
up to three months.

Research in rats, carp, parrots
and pigeons has also shown that they too can distinguish between different
types of music.

Song birds such as the Java
sparrows have also shown that they develop distinct musical taste
s –
some prefer classical music while others prefer modern and others avoid
music altogether.

Professor Watanabe added: “Species which show preferences for music might have
some relevant phylogenetic contingencies in their evolutionary history.

“For example, both humans and songbirds have evolved to acquire complex
auditory learning abilities, namely ones specialised for language and song.

“The common existence of such abilities in certain species might lead those
species to imbue music with reinforcing properties (a preference for a type
of music).”

Source Article from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/10276759/Goldfish-are-music-connoisseurs.html

Apple’s Late Entry to Music Streaming Could Still Outplay the Field – Yahoo! Finance (blog)

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Friday 30 August 2013 10:24 pm

The streaming music business is bracing for the entry of a brand-new player — but one that may become an instant giant.

iTunes Radio

Apple (AAPL) is set to unveil its iTunes Radio service in the United States next month, backed by all its marketing muscle, a decade of experience selling downloadable music and 575 million paying customers.

The long-anticipated move comes just as top streaming services such as Pandora (P), Spotify and Songza appear to have started making a serious dent in sales of digital songs for download, where Apple’s iTunes store is the dominant player.

Overall music sales of albums and singles were down 4.6% in the first half of this year compared to 2012, according to Nielsen SoundScan. That included a 2.3% drop in sales of digital singles. Sales of digital albums rose 6.3%.

Apple has been able to avoid offering a streaming or subscription service until now, thanks to robust download sales. But, as that business peaks, Apple finally has plans to enter the crowded field of streaming players.

No fear from Pandora

Current online music players say they’re not afraid. Pandora CEO Joe Kennedy has dismissed the looming Apple threat. “We’ve seen competitors large and small enter the market and, in some cases, exit the market,” Kennedy told the AllThingsD blog. “I’ve never seen an analysis that identifies an effect from any competitor … we don’t see the picture changing.”

Other competitors have noted that customers tend to use multiple services and that the arrival of a new, highly publicized player could broaden the market for all.

Like Pandora, iTunes Radio won’t let customers choose to play specific songs – that’s the realm of more-expensive services that work on your phone, such as Spotify’s premium offering and Google’s (GOOG) Play Music All Access.

Apple’s service will be free with occasional advertisements, though subscribers to its $25 per year iTunes Match feature will get an ad-free version. That’s similar to Pandora, which has 71 million active listeners per month and charges $36 a year for ad removal. Both rates are much less than the services that give users total control over music selection on their phones, such as Google, which charges $10 a month.

The music-matching model

Instead of choosing specific songs, users of iTunes Radio will be able to select a music genre or favorite artist and hear a stream of songs selected to match the choice. A Bruce Springsteen station might mix songs by the Boss along with artists such as Bob Seger or John Cafferty. Listeners can rate each song, helping the services provide ever-more-personalized streams.

That’s still more control than Clear Channel’s iHeartRadio service, which beams users live playlists from the company’s 800 radio stations and others.

Apple’s iTune store already offers an idea of how its radio service might operate, in the “Listeners Also Bought” section, where it suggests additional purchases. Under Justin Timberlake’s new album, The 20/20 Experience, for example, iTunes suggests tracks by Frank Ocean, Rihanna and Adam Lambert among others.

Pandora supporters say Apple won’t be able to match the current leader’s personalization feature, known as genome. Pandora has human reviewers categorize songs along numerous attributes and uses the data to find songs comparable to ones a customer has already liked.

Apple may be able to spread its service to other parts of the world more rapidly than its competitors, thanks to its direct contracts with the big music publishers. Pandora is currently only available in a few countries outside of the U.S., due to rights issues.

Though iTunes radio will initially only be available in the U.S., analysts expect a roll-out in Europe by the end of the year and other markets in 2014.

So, despite Apple’s late entry to the online streaming game, that could make the newcomer into a global giant.

To keep up with all the latest tech industry news, follow Aaron Pressman on Twitter and Tumblr.

Check out more Yahoo! Finance content here on Tumblr.

Source Article from http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/the-exchange/apple-entry-music-streaming-could-still-outplay-field-171425536.html

Pop music encourages young to binge drink: Quarter of chart lyrics over three … – Daily Mail

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Friday 30 August 2013 7:08 am
  • Rap, hip hop and R&B were most likely to mention alcohol
  • Four brands of spirits made up more than half of references to labels

By
Liz Hull

23:49 GMT, 29 August 2013


|

01:49 GMT, 30 August 2013

Pop songs which refer to alcohol brands could be encouraging young people to binge drink and have sex, experts have warned.

Almost a quarter of chart music lyrics over a three-year period mentioned booze, analysts said.

Four brands of spirits – Patron tequila, Hennessy cognac, Grey Goose vodka, and Jack Daniel’s whiskey – made up more than half of specific references to labels.

Rihanna swigging straight from a bottle of wine
 Kanye West performs during the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards

Songs by Rihanna (left) and Kanye West (right) feature specific references to brands of alcohol

The songs almost always showed alcohol as a good thing. More than one in ten, or 16 per cent, linked getting drunk with sex.

Rihanna’s song Cheers states: ‘I drink to that/ Oh let the Jameson sink in’.

In Bittersweet, Kanye West raps: ‘This relationship it even got me back to drinkin’/ Now this Hennessy it’s going to be the death of me’.

Rap, hip hop and R&B were most likely to mention booze, at 38 per cent, then country music at 22 per cent and pop at 15 per cent.

In How We Do, British pop star Rita Ora sings: ‘You look so sweet while you’re dreaming/ Holding your bottle of Tanqueray’, while in his song Jack Daniels, country idol Eric Church says: ‘I’ve thrown a punch or two . . . But Jack Daniel’s kicked my ass again last night.’

US experts analysed the 720 top songs of 2009, 2010 and 2011 as ranked by Billboard Magazine. In all, 167 mentioned alcohol and 46 songs mentioned brands.

Four brands of spirits, including Patron tequila, made up more than half of specific references to labels
Four brands of spirits, including Grey Goose vodka, made up more than half of specific references to labels

Four brands of spirits, including Patron tequila (right) and Grey Goose vodka (left), made up more than half of specific references to labels

Professor Michael Siegel, of  Boston University, said: ‘Many songs glamorise underage drinking and excessive alcohol consumption and their association with sex and partying.’

He said: ‘A small number of alcohol brands and beverages appear to make frequent appearances in popular music.

‘If these exposures are found to influence youth drinking behavior, then further public health efforts must be focused on youth exposure to alcohol portrayals in popular music.’

The songs almost always showed alcohol as a good thing. More than one in ten, or 16 per cent, linked getting drunk with sex

The songs almost always showed alcohol as a good thing. More than one in ten, or 16 per cent, linked getting drunk with sex

The comments below have not been moderated.

Rubbish, other frequent words often heard is sweet and dream but that doesn’t make us rush out to buy some sugar in our sleep.

John
,

Bridgend,
30/8/2013 08:02

Because obviously we all listen to R Kelly ‘I believe I can fly’ then jump off a bridge because we too believe we can then fly!

sayingithowitis
,

UK,
30/8/2013 07:53

Rap,rnb and indie rock must die,bring back funk the music of freedom,hope and love.

Funklord
,

Forest gate,
30/8/2013 07:45

What else are they going to come with if people want to drink or take drugs they will its nothing to do with what they see or hear

freedom-of-speech
,

Stockport uk,
30/8/2013 07:26

No way?! At least they don’t encourage “popping mollys”. Thanks captain obvious, modern rap is terrible music

sugarmoose
,

Orange County,
30/8/2013 07:20

I feel like binge drinking when listening to most of the processed pap that’s in the charts these days. I blame Simon Cowell. Hic.

dan75
,

Leeds, England,
30/8/2013 07:05

And Rock talks of drugs and hard drugs too. So what’s your point. Sir Mick Jagger and his Rolling Stones were prolific drug takers in true Rock fashion.

Tony
,

London,
30/8/2013 07:03

Movies show people jumping off tall buildings and landing on their feet. Don’t knock the artist. Blame the in controlling parents breeding without a clue!

Mr Singh
,

South-West,
30/8/2013 06:27

Maybe be a parent and monitor what your kids watch/listen to? The musicians (and I’m using that term very loosely) have a right to sing about what they want. If you don’t want your kids influenced by it, either talk to them about it, or don’t let them listen to it. Take those One Direction kids for example, they’re music is perfectly acceptable, but if you look at their twitters they’re littered with cursing. I wouldn’t care personally, but someone with a twelve year old shouldn’t blame One Direction if they curse because of seeing them do it. They should blame themselves for not watching their kids. And if enough parents don’t let their kids listen to or buy the music/merch the artist won’t have a fan base and therefore won’t be able to make music anymore. Don’t complain about Nicki Minaj being a bad influence and then buy your kid her album or let him/her watch the VMAs!

Taylor Russo
,

New York, United States,
30/8/2013 06:19

I do agree that today’s music is very influencing re sex drugs and alcohol nearly every song is the same it’s difficult these data to put the radio on and be able to listen without monitoring all the time what your children listen to and as I’m a community mental health worker it’s also difficult to judge what maybe offensive to others when travelling in your car so basically easier nit to switch radio on!!!

pebbles
,

Blackpool uk,
30/8/2013 06:05

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Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2406190/Pop-lyrics-encourage-young-binge-drink-Quarter-chart-music-lyrics-year-period-mentioned-alcohol.html

New Metrics And Tools Like Ultimate Chart Reveal Music Industry’s Secret … – Forbes

Posted by Google News | Industry News | Thursday 29 August 2013 3:58 pm
Daft PUnk

Daft Punk (source: Wikipedia)

If you believe everything you read, the music industry is swirling the financial drain. There’s always some new study or article that purports to show how business is much worse than it’s ever been. But every industry goes through changes at some point and either evolves or dies. Why should the music industry be any different?

The fact of the matter is that if you combine the global revenue from recorded music, licensing, publishing, merchandise and touring, 2012 was better than ever for the music business as a whole, with over $67 billion in global revenue. That said, revenue for the recorded music business slipped about .3% last year, according to the International Federation of Phonograph Industry (IFPI).

But there are some bright signs even in the recorded music part of the business. Take Adele, for instance. Since her 21 album was released in 2011, the album has sold more than 28 million units world-wide and is amongst the best selling of all time. A few years prior, pundits the world over said a sales number like that would never be reached again, and would in fact never see another album with even 5 million sales. So much for that prediction.

Then along came Psy in 2012 and 1.7 billion views of “Gangham Style” later (plus another 530 million of “Gentleman”), and you can see not only how the pundits were wrong again, but how business was morphing away from sales into streaming. A big hit is a big hit, and didn’t necessarily need sales anymore to identify it as such.

This year we have Daft Punk, who’s “Get Lucky” has been streamed over 107 million times on Spotify alone. Add another 115 million views on YouTube and around 4 million in actual sales and you can see that even though the music business has changed in a big way, it still has what every business needs – customers. We just deliver the product to them differently than ever before.

The big change is that today’s music lover does indeed consume in more ways than ever before, thanks to the plethora of technology available. Sales of physical product (which still comprises over 60% of the total sales) and downloads are decreasing, while streaming of all sorts, from YouTube to services like Spotify and Pandora, are increasing. Expect that increase to accelerate even more as soon as the the upcoming iTunes Radio and Beats Music services come online.

The point is, the music business is much healthier than people think or even would like to believe. We just need a new way to classify exactly what a hit is, because sales don’t and can’t tell the whole story.

That’s why more attention should be paid to something like the Ultimate Chart (Katy Perry’s “Roar” tops it this week), which uses not only sales, but radio airplay and online listening and watching to determine the most popular songs. Every measurement has a flaw and it’s most likely that the Ultimate Chart does too, but at least it’s a 21st Century answer to the problem that our mostly 20th Century industry finds itself in. Regardless of the way it’s delivered, a hit is a hit. We’ve just go to recognize it. 

Source Article from http://www.forbes.com/sites/bobbyowsinski/2013/08/29/what-adele-psy-and-daft-punk-have-in-common/

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